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Interviews with Political Scientists about their New Books
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New Books in Political Science New Books Network

    • Social Sciences
    • 3.6 • 5 Ratings

Interviews with Political Scientists about their New Books
Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

    Rachel Z. Friedman, "Probable Justice: Rethinking the Politics of Risk" (U Chicago Press, 2020)

    Rachel Z. Friedman, "Probable Justice: Rethinking the Politics of Risk" (U Chicago Press, 2020)

    The emergence of individual and commercial insurance in Early Modern Europe required an understanding of probability. In Probable Justice: Rethinking the Politics of Risk (U Chicago Press, 2020), Rachel Friedman highlights the political thinking that developed side by side with the advances in statistical methods. By the 20th century, small scale, group insurance had become national programs with profound political implications. Friedman's work traces how what she calls probabilistic social insurance played a key role in the emergence of the modern welfare state. And we discuss where we go from here, post-pandemic, when all insurances systems have been put to the test.
    Daniel Peris is Senior Vice President at Federated Hermes in Pittsburgh. He can be reached at DanielxPeris@gmail.com or via Twitter @HistoryInvestor. His History and Investing blog and Keep Calm & Carry On Investing podcast are at https://strategicdividendinves...
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    • 42 min
    Matthew O. Jackson, "The Human Network: How Your Social Position Determines Your Power, Beliefs, and Behaviors" (Vintage, 2019)

    Matthew O. Jackson, "The Human Network: How Your Social Position Determines Your Power, Beliefs, and Behaviors" (Vintage, 2019)

    Social networks existed and shaped our lives long before Silicon Valley startups made them virtual. For over two decades economist Matthew O. Jackson, a professor at Stanford University, has studied how the shape of networks and our positions within them can affect us. In this interview, he explains how network structures can create poverty traps, exacerbate financial crises, and contribute to political polarization. He also explains how a new awareness of the role of networks has been used to improve financial regulation, promote public health knowledge, and guide vaccination strategy.
    Jackson also discusses how he first began to study networks, previously neglected by economists, and how economists can both learn from and contribute to the exciting cross-disciplinary dialogue among researchers from sociology, math, physics, and other fields.
    Professor Jackson's website provides free access to the chapter on contagion, of particular interest in this time of pandemic. For those who want to learn even more than the book can cover, he offers a free online course on the topic.
    Host Peter Lorentzen is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of San Francisco, where he leads a new digital economy-focused Master's program in Applied Economics.
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    • 1 hr 6 min
    Postscript: Biden's First 100 Days

    Postscript: Biden's First 100 Days

    Much has long been made of the bold legislative action that President Franklin Delano Roosevelt marshalled forward in his first 100 days in office in the midst of the Great Depression. To take stock of the Biden presidency, Lilly and Susan asked three thoughtful political scientists—Dr. Jonathan Bernstein (Bloomberg Media), Dr. Nadia E. Brown (Purdue University), and Dr. Jane Junn (University of Southern California) to interrogate the early days of the Biden Administration. They not only provided keen observations about the Executive Branch, but also about Congress and state governments. The lively discussion shifted quickly from the arbitrary marker of the first 100 days to what is necessary to move policy forward in the closely divided U.S. House and Senate, and what the legislative agenda may look like going forward. We chat about the apparent pause in the swift swirling of our politics—though we debate whether the new administration is a return to normalcy and if it is possible, post Trump, to return to normalcy. In this context, there was a discussion of competence, expertise, intelligence, rationality,
    preparation, and integrity. We pay close attention to the political parties, with specific focus on the internal tensions in both the Democratic Party and the Republican Party. Our guests also spend time framing the political landscape with an understanding of the role and place of news media and social media.
    Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj.
    Susan Liebell is an associate professor of political science at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia. Why Diehard Originalists Aren’t Really Originalists recently appeared in the Washington Post’s Monkey Cage and “Retreat from the Rule of Law: Locke and the Perils of Stand Your Ground” was published in the Journal of Politics (July 2020). Email her comments at sliebell@sju.edu or tweet to @SusanLiebell.
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    • 1 hr 1 min
    Christian A. Williams, "National Liberation in Postcolonial Southern Africa: A Historical Ethnography of SWAPO's Exile Camps" (Cambridge UP, 2015)

    Christian A. Williams, "National Liberation in Postcolonial Southern Africa: A Historical Ethnography of SWAPO's Exile Camps" (Cambridge UP, 2015)

    In National Liberation in Postcolonial Southern Africa: A Historical Ethnography of SWAPO’s Exile Camps (Cambridge University Press, 2015), Christian Williams tells the stories of the many exiles that lived in camps established by the South West Africa People’s Organization (SWAPO) during Namibia’s three-decade liberation struggle. Through extensive use of oral testimonies as well as photographic and documentary materials, Williams describes the wide range of experiences that exiles encountered at many of the camps managed by SWAPO throughout Southern Africa. He concludes that the commonly used ways of describing these camps, as either housing refugees or for military purposes, are insufficient to capture their complexity, and to understand their long- lasting impact on the formation of an independent Namibia. Liberation movement camps, as Williams describes them, were sites where, among other things, conflict and violence set the stage for the development of social and political hierarchies which continue to shape Namibia’s postcolonial life. Yet, official histories of the liberation struggle exclude the stories and experiences that many exiles underwent during their time at the camps complicating their ability to see themselves as part of the new nation. This book makes a compelling case for the study liberation movement camps as a means to rewrite the history that underpins Namibia’s postcolonial future.
    Esperanza Brizuela-Garcia is an associate professor of history at Montclair State University.
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    • 1 hr 14 min
    Michela Wrong, "Do Not Disturb: The Story of a Political Murder and an African Regime Gone Bad" (PublicAffairs, 2021)

    Michela Wrong, "Do Not Disturb: The Story of a Political Murder and an African Regime Gone Bad" (PublicAffairs, 2021)

    Michela Wrong’s Do Not Disturb: The Story of a Political Murder and an African Regime Gone Bad (PublicAffairs, 2021) is a glorious piece of journalism. It tells the story of Rwanda’s former head of external intelligence turned government critic, Patrick Karegeya, and his falling out with the Rwandan leadership, including current President Paul Kagame. For Wrong, the murder of Patrick Karegeya provides a passage-way into broader conversations about how Rwanda has been ruled since the 1994 genocide. Why are members of the elite like Karegeya leaving Rwanda? And what do these elite flights tell us about political stability in contemporary Rwanda? Wrong’s storytelling choices draw the reader into Rwanda’s complex post-colonial political culture while reminding us that the story of Karegeya’s murder is emblematic of how the revolution eats its own.
    Susan Thomson is an Associate Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies at Colgate University.
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    • 46 min
    Graham Smith, "Can Democracy Safeguard the Future?" (Polity, 2021)

    Graham Smith, "Can Democracy Safeguard the Future?" (Polity, 2021)

    Our democracies repeatedly fail to safeguard the future. From pensions to pandemics, health and social care through to climate, biodiversity and emerging technologies, democracies have been unable to deliver robust policies for the long term. 
    In Can Democracy Safeguard the Future? (Polity Press, 2021), Graham Smith, a leading scholar of democratic theory and practice, asks why? Exploring the drivers of the short-termism that dominate contemporary politics, he considers ways of reshaping legislatures and constitutions and proposes strengthening independent offices whose overarching goals do not change at every election. More radically, Smith argues that forms of participatory and deliberative politics offer the most effective democratic response to the current political myopia as well as a powerful means of protecting the interests of generations to come.
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    • 49 min

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5
5 Ratings

5 Ratings

Nipsey_Russell_ ,

Brilliant

excellent resource for new academic pol-sci books and ideas

Mawbrown110 ,

Great pod

Great information from a diverse range of up and comers in the world of political science.

very funny and clever pod ,

Lefty crap

Mostly far left bs from far left academics

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