313 episodes

Podcasts for the insatiably curious by the world’s most popular weekly science magazine. Everything from the latest science and technology news to the big-picture questions about life, the universe and what it means to be human.
For more visit newscientist.com/podcasts

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New Scientist Podcasts New Scientist

    • Science
    • 4.3 • 238 Ratings

Podcasts for the insatiably curious by the world’s most popular weekly science magazine. Everything from the latest science and technology news to the big-picture questions about life, the universe and what it means to be human.
For more visit newscientist.com/podcasts

Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    CultureLab: The incredible, intelligent abilities of plants with Zoë Schlanger

    CultureLab: The incredible, intelligent abilities of plants with Zoë Schlanger

    What if we told you plants can hear and see? And memorise information? And track time to adapt their pollination techniques? And even look out for their family members? These are just some of the remarkable behaviours plants are capable of – many of which we’re only just learning about now. 
    Science journalist Zoë Schlanger’s new book The Light Eaters will make you question everything you currently assume about the green life around us, and even what “intelligence” can mean. 
    In this episode, Schlanger walks us through some of the incredible abilities and behaviours plants employ to not only survive, but thrive – from orchids sexually deceiving wasps, to shape-shifting vines that flew under the radar of researchers for decades. And, she suggests, it might be time to rethink how we do science to accommodate the seemingly endless adaptability of plants.  
    To read about subjects like this and much more, visit newscientist.com.

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    • 36 min
    Weekly: Woolly mammoth jerky; Google simulates the origin of life; food without farming

    Weekly: Woolly mammoth jerky; Google simulates the origin of life; food without farming

    #258
    Fancy a bite of woolly mammoth jerky? A beef-jerky-like fossil of this prehistoric creature has been discovered – a metre-long piece of skin still covered in hair. And the most amazing thing is that the entire genome has remained intact, giving more insight into these creatures than ever before. Could this help bring woolly mammoths back to life?
    There is a way to make butter not from cows, not from vegetable oils or even microbes, but from pure carbon. And if you want a climate friendly way of producing a delicious spreadable fat, this may just be it. A company called Savor is using a process that can convert captured CO2 or natural gas into fatty acids. 
    The origin of life is a huge scientific mystery: how can something so complex emerge from inert and random molecules? Well, Google has created a simulation to figure this out. The company has used computer code to recreate the random ‘primordial soup’ of early Earth, with results that might baffle you. 
    When mammals breastfeed, calcium is stripped from their bones to make the milk, but their bones don’t get significantly weaker. How does that work? Well, a new, bone-strengthening hormone found in mice may have finally solved the long-standing mystery – and could benefit human health.
    Plus: How our pupils change size with every breath; how cosmic rays could help protect financial markets; and how ancient Denisovan DNA may have helped the people of Papua New Guinea adapt to their environment.
    Hosts Timothy Revell and Christie Taylor discuss with guests Corryn Wetzel, Madeleine Cuff, Matthew Sparkes and Grace Wade.
    To read more about these stories, visit newscientist.com.

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    • 31 min
    Dead Planets Society: Putting Black Holes Inside Stuff

    Dead Planets Society: Putting Black Holes Inside Stuff

    Primordial black holes are tiny versions of the big beasts you typically think of. They’re so small, they could easily fit inside stuff, like a planet, or a star… or a person. So, needless to say, this has piqued the curiosity of our Dead Planeteers.
    Leah and Chelsea want to know, can you put primordial black holes inside things and what happens if you do? 
    Black hole astronomer Allison Kirkpatrick at the University of Kansas is back to help them figure this one out. And it turns out, despite being very small, these black holes are incredibly heavy, so ingesting and/or hugging them seems firmly off the cards - much to Chelsea’s displeasure.
    Dead Planets Society is a podcast that takes outlandish ideas about how to tinker with the cosmos – from punching a hole in a planet to unifying the asteroid belt – and subjects them to the laws of physics to see how they fare.
    Your hosts are Leah Crane and Chelsea Whyte.
    If you have a cosmic object you’d like to figure out how to destroy, email the team at deadplanets@newscientist.com. It may just feature in a later episode.

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    • 24 min
    Weekly: World’s Oldest Ritual; Quantum Wi-Fi; Report from the Arctic

    Weekly: World’s Oldest Ritual; Quantum Wi-Fi; Report from the Arctic

    #257
    Two extraordinary findings have been unearthed about our ancient ancestors. The first is a discovery from a cave in Australia – evidence of what could be the world’s oldest ritual, practised continuously for 12,000 years. And the second is the discovery that the world’s oldest evidence of storytelling may be even older than we thought.
    We may be able to mine for nickel using flowers. The method is much more sustainable than traditional mining and is actually being used by some companies. Is it enough to turn mining green?
    Quantum communication is going wireless. The new chip responsible for this quantum Wi-Fi is a huge step forward for the technology and could speed up the creation of safer, unhackable internet networks.
    From onboard a kayak roaming the Arctic Ocean, Rowan Hooper brings a report from his trip to Svalbard, where he saw first-hand the retreating glaciers that have been melting rapidly due to climate change. As these glaciers disappear, soil is being exposed for the first time. What impact is this having on the landscape? Rowan speaks to arctic biogeochemist James Bradley of Queen Mary University, London.
    Plus: The first non-human animal to perform medical amputations; giving the moon a time-zone; and how eggshells can help regrow broken bones.
    Hosts Timothy Revell and Christie Taylor discuss with guests James Woodford, James Dinneen, Karmela Padavic-Callaghan, Rowan Hooper and James Bradley.
    To read more about these stories, visit newscientist.com.

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    • 33 min
    CultureLab: Sonifying Mars, symphonically, with David Ibbett

    CultureLab: Sonifying Mars, symphonically, with David Ibbett

    Despite humans having never set foot on Mars, scientists have been working for decades to paint a picture of life on the red planet. With the help of photos and videos from robotic rovers, scientists now know more than ever about its rocky terrain, early history and current climate.
    Now, experts are painting a fuller picture of the dusty planet by using audio recordings captured by these rovers. Composer David Ibbett has used that data in epic fashion: to create an immersive concert that harnesses the sounds of Mars and transforms them into musical instruments and melodies. 
    In this episode, Ibbett explains to host Bethan Ackerley how ‘Mars Symphony’ includes the real sounds of Mars’ winds, dust devils and seismic rumbles and takes the audience on an interplanetary journey through the past, present and future of the red planet. 
    Still curious? Attend an upcoming performance or experience the music of Mars from your computer, at MarsSymphony.com.
    To read about subjects like this and much more, visit newscientist.com.

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    • 37 min
    Weekly: Even more powerful gene editing than CRISPR; first moon samples from the far side; dangerous new mpox

    Weekly: Even more powerful gene editing than CRISPR; first moon samples from the far side; dangerous new mpox

    #256
    A new gene editing technique may be more powerful than CRISPR. Bridge editing is still in its infancy, but could be revolutionary for its ability to more specifically target gene substitutions. This method of altering DNA may let us create single treatments for gene mutations across large groups of people – something even CRISPR can’t do.
    China’s Chang’e 6 spacecraft has returned to Earth with samples from the far side of the moon – the first ever. Hear what the samples may tell us about this hard-to-study part of the lunar surface, plus what China is planning for its next big exploration missions.
    A dangerous new strain of mpox, formerly known as monkeypox, has been identified in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. A thousand cases have been reported since September and several hundred people have died. What makes this strain so dangerous and can it be kept under control?
    A fossil has been discovered that is thought to be a Neanderthal child who had Down’s syndrome. It’s estimated the child lived to at least 6 years old and may have received extra care from the community – more evidence that Neanderthals weren’t as brutish and unfeeling as thought.
    Plus: The kind of paper that’s most likely to give you a papercut; AI being trained to perform elegant chess moves; a creepy robot made with human skin
    Hosts Timothy Revell and Christie Taylor discuss with guests Michael Le Page, Leah Crane, Alexandra Thompson and Chris Simms.
    To read more about these stories, visit newscientist.com.

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    • 23 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
238 Ratings

238 Ratings

DDM16 ,

Great content, could be better presented

Great content and really useful but please try to put facts into context eg piece on inability of geological carbon capture gave no idea of how significant this was as proportion of total capture. Also please pronounce scientific terms properly- many examples but latest was tinnitus (both short i)

tomevo7 ,

New Scientist for life

My Dad has followed New Scientist almost his whole life. My grandma put him onto the magazine when he was young. She was a biology teacher and told him; “This is a good publication, follow this.” He went on to study natural science at Cambridge university.

Inspiration is the key. The podcast team have nailed it. Always exciting, digestible and interesting. The podcast has well structured dialogue and themed segments that keep you eager for more.
So then you have to go and read the articles!

New Scientist and the team are a force for good.

Unsubscribed Now ,

Dumbed down and irritating

I have been a subscriber to New Scientist since it began in the ‘60s, and regard the magazine as an important part of my news and current affairs information.
This podcast is maddening however, dumbed down and interrupted by advertisements. Reading one can ignore an advert which is of no interest, here you have to endure it or break concentration to skip it.

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