145 episodes

Twice a week, the Guardian brings you the latest science and environment news.

Science Weekly The Guardian

    • Science
    • 4.1 • 479 Ratings

Twice a week, the Guardian brings you the latest science and environment news.

    What should we do about monkeypox?

    What should we do about monkeypox?

    The sudden surge of monkeypox cases outside Africa has alarmed public health authorities around the world. In Europe and North America it’s the first time community transmission has been recorded among people with no links to west or central Africa. So what is happening? Ian Sample talks to virologist Oyewale Tomori about why monkeypox is flaring up, whether we should fear it, and what we can learn from countries such as Nigeria and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, which have been tackling this virus for decades. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 13 min
    What will the cost of living crisis do to our health?

    What will the cost of living crisis do to our health?

    Millions around the world are struggling with higher food and energy prices. In the UK inflation has reached a 40-year high of 9% in the 12 months to April, leaving many struggling to pay bills and shoulder normal living costs. When the weekly shop gets smaller and the flat gets colder, it’s our health that suffers. Madeleine Finlay speaks to health inequity expert Prof Michael Marmot about the ways poverty makes you sicker and why falling income is so bad for the country’s health. This cost of living crisis could be “austerity squared”, he warns.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 14 min
    The destruction of Gran Chaco, forgotten sister of the Amazon rainforest

    The destruction of Gran Chaco, forgotten sister of the Amazon rainforest

    From deep inside Gran Chaco, a dry tropical forest in Argentina one and a half times the size of California, comes a wake-up call for the world’s forests. We’ve lost more than a fifth of this incredibly biodiverse region since 1985. And it’s just one of many precious carbon-trapping ecosystems being lost to unrelenting deforestation. Six months ago in Glasgow, world leaders at Cop26 pledged to end and reverse deforestation by 2030. While destruction continues apace in Brazil and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, other countries such as Indonesia offer glimmers of hope. Madeleine Finlay speaks to biodiversity reporter Patrick Greenfield about what his trip to Gran Chaco showed him, what’s at stake around the world, and what’s needed to turn things around. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 12 min
    Is the world keeping Cop26’s climate promises?

    Is the world keeping Cop26’s climate promises?

    Last November in Glasgow, countries agreed to limit the global temperature rise to 1.5C above pre-industrial averages. Six months on, the world has changed, with the war in Ukraine, high energy prices and the cost of living crisis threatening to derail us from achieving our climate goals. Ian Sample speaks to the Guardian’s environment correspondent, Fiona Harvey, about what promises are still on the table and what else needs to be done to address the climate emergency as we approach the next conference, Cop27.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 13 min
    Why aren’t women getting diagnosed with ADHD?

    Why aren’t women getting diagnosed with ADHD?

    It’s estimated that a million women in the UK could have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder – but according to the ADHD Foundation, 50–75% of them do not know they have it. Going without a diagnosis can impact someone’s education, employment and physical and mental health. So why are women being left behind? Madeleine Finlay speaks to Jasmine Andersson about her experience of getting a late diagnosis, and Prof Amanda Kirby on why the condition is so often missed in women and girls.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 15 min
    ‘It’s a hellfire!’: how are India and Pakistan coping with extreme heat?

    ‘It’s a hellfire!’: how are India and Pakistan coping with extreme heat?

    India and Pakistan have experienced their hottest April in 122 years. Temperatures are nearing 50C. Such extreme heat dries up water reservoirs, melts glaciers and damages crops. It’s also deadly. Ian Sample hears from Pakistan reporter Shah Meer Baloch about the situation on the ground, and speaks to Indian heat health expert Abhiyant Tiwari about what such temperatures do to the body and how south Asia is adapting to ever more frequent – and ever more extreme – heatwaves.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 11 min

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5
479 Ratings

479 Ratings

mrratcatcher ,

It's great

Very interesting and makes my subscription worth it!

kalatatio ,

Ads too long

The episode didn’t start until 2 minutes 45 in a 13 minute episode. I understand the need for ads but you’re taking the piss here.

Malŵ ,

17 March - Covid cases on the rise

Your correspondent, Nicola Davies, seems to have forgotten that Wales is also one of Britain’s nations. Throughout the piece she refers to case numbers in Scotland, Northern Ireland and England but never a mention of the situation in Wales. I assume that the Guardian realises that it has readers in Wales who’d be interested in knowing about their situation. Sloppy journalism.

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