41 episodes

World Review is the global affairs podcast from the New Statesman, hosted by Jeremy Cliffe in Berlin and Emily Tamkin in Washington D.C.

World Review from the New Statesma‪n‬ New Statesman

    • Politics
    • 4.6 • 57 Ratings

World Review is the global affairs podcast from the New Statesman, hosted by Jeremy Cliffe in Berlin and Emily Tamkin in Washington D.C.

    Lessons From The Arab Spring

    Lessons From The Arab Spring

    Sir John Jenkins, formerly the UK's ambassador to Iraq, Libya and Saudi Arabia, joins Emily Tamkin in Washington DC and Ido Vock in Berlin to look at the decade that's passed since the Arab Spring, and what lessons have been learnt in both the region and the wider international community.


    Further reading:
    Sir John Jenkins' piece, The lights that failed, discusses why the cause of liberal democracy collapsed in the Middle East.
    BBC Middle East Editor, Jeremy Bowen, has written for the New Statesman to explore how the dream of the Arab Spring died.


    We'd love to hear from you! Send us your You Ask Us questions at youaskus.co.uk. Find us on Twitter: @idvck and @emilyctamkin.


    Subscribing to the New Statesman helps us keep producing this podcast. You can now subscribe for 12 weeks for just £12. Visit newstatesman.com/subscribe12


    More audio from the New Statesman: listen to our twice-weekly UK politics podcast The New Statesman podcast


    If you are a New Statesman digital subscriber you can get ad-free access to this podcast by visiting newstatesman.com/nssubscribers.
     
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    • 28 min
    Myanmar's Democratic Future

    Myanmar's Democratic Future

    Large scale protests have been taking place in Myanmar since a military coup on February 1st deposed the democratically-elected leader, Aung San Suu Kyi. This week, the UN Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Myanmar reported that the military were being deployed to the city of Yangon, raising fears of bloodshed. Protesters are calling for the release of Aung San Suu Kyi and other political prisoners, but activist groups have raised concerns that even that may not be enough to restore democracy in Myanmar.


    On this episode of World Review from the New Statesman, Emily Tamkin in Washington DC and Ido Vock in Berlin are joined by Wai Hnin Pwint Thon, an activist for Burma Campaign UK whose father was one of those arrested in the days following the military coup. They discuss why the military have taken power, what this means for Myanmar, and whether there is a road to true democracy for the country.


    Further reading:
    Francis Wade has also been following the situation in Myanmar, and has written this piece exploring how democracy might be defined after the military coup.


    Emily has been reporting on the Texas storms that have caused power outages leaving millions in freezing conditions without heating or hot water. She writes that the storms offer a warning to ill-prepared governments.


    Ido discusses how new variants of Covid 19 could continue to limit international travel for years beyond the immediate crisis.


    We'd love to hear from you! Send us your You Ask Us questions at youaskus.co.uk. Find us on Twitter: @idvck and @emilyctamkin.


    Subscribing to the New Statesman helps us keep producing this podcast. You can now subscribe for 12 weeks for just £12. Visit newstatesman.com/subscribe12


    More audio from the New Statesman: listen to our twice-weekly UK politics podcast The New Statesman podcast


    If you are a New Statesman digital subscriber you can get ad-free access to this podcast by visiting newstatesman.com/nssubscribers.
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 26 min
    Water Off a Dutch Back

    Water Off a Dutch Back

    On 17th March the Netherlands will to the polls in the 2021 general election. In this episode of World Review from the New Statesman, Emily Tamkin in Washington DC and Ido Vock in Berlin are joined by Pepijn Bergsen, a research fellow in the Europe Programme at Chatham House, to discuss the upcoming Dutch elections. Will Geert Wilders improve his far-right party's performance from 2017? Is the coronavirus pandemic and the EU's troubled vaccine rollout having an impact in the polls? And what, if anything, can flap the unflappable Dutch?


    We'd love to hear from you! Send us your You Ask Us questions at youaskus.co.uk. Find us on Twitter: @idvck and @emilyctamkin.


    Subscribing to the New Statesman helps us keep producing this podcast. You can now subscribe for 12 weeks for just £12. Visit newstatesman.com/subscribe12


    More audio from the New Statesman: listen to our twice-weekly UK politics podcast The New Statesman podcast


    If you are a New Statesman digital subscriber you can get ad-free access to this podcast by visiting newstatesman.com/nssubscribers.
     
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    • 26 min
    What Alexei Navalny's arrest means for Vladimir Putin

    What Alexei Navalny's arrest means for Vladimir Putin

    On his return to Russia from Germany, where he'd been recuperating after being poisoned by a nerve agent, Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny was arrested for criminal charges resurrected by the Kremlin from a years-old conviction. In the days since, peaceful protesters have taken to the streets demanding Navalny's freedom. They've been met with brutality. Does this mean trouble for Vladmir Putin and the Kremlin? In this episode, Emily Tamkin in Washington DC and Ido Vock in Berlin are joined, from Moscow, by Felix Light, a reporter for The Moscow Times and regular contributor to the New Statesman. They discuss the trial of Alexei Navalny, protest movements against Putin's rule, and what international sanctions are available if Russia continues to flout international norms.


    Further reading:


    Ido argues that by returning to Russia and facing arrest, Alexei Navalny has forced the Kremlin on to the back foot.


    For background, read Felix Light's piece explaining why, for Navalny, a comfortable life abroad was not an option.


    Emily has been following the vote in Congress to strip extremist Marjorie Taylor Greene of her committee assignments. She's written this piece exploring why republicans have chosen to support the congresswoman who has promoted racist, Islamophobic and anti-semitic views.




    We'd love to hear from you! Send us your You Ask Us questions at youaskus.co.uk. Find us on Twitter: @idvck and @emilyctamkin.


    Subscribing to the New Statesman helps us keep producing this podcast. You can now subscribe for 12 weeks for just £12. Visit newstatesman.com/subscribe12


    More audio from the New Statesman: listen to our twice-weekly UK politics podcast The New Statesman podcast


    If you are a New Statesman digital subscriber you can get ad-free access to this podcast by visiting newstatesman.com/nssubscribers.
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 34 min
    Wuhan, One Year On

    Wuhan, One Year On

    On today's episode of World Review from the New Statesman, Jeremy Cliffe in Berlin and Emily Tamkin in Washington DC are joined by Rui Zhong, Program Assistant for the Kissinger Institute on China and the United States at the Wilson Center, to discuss how Wuhan has (or hasn't) bounced back from the first days of covid-19, whether there's a growing anti-China sentiment globally, and how administrations from the US to the EU and Britain should handle diplomacy with Beijing in 2021.


    We'd love to hear from you! Send us your You Ask Us questions at youaskus.co.uk. Find us on Twitter: @jeremycliffe and @emilyctamkin.


    Subscribing to the New Statesman helps us keep producing this podcast. You can now subscribe for 12 weeks for just £12. Visit newstatesman.com/subscribe12


    More audio from the New Statesman: listen to our twice-weekly UK politics podcast The New Statesman podcast


    If you are a New Statesman digital subscriber you can get ad-free access to this podcast by visiting newstatesman.com/nssubscribers.


    Topics in this episode:
    China
    Wuhan
    Coronavirus / Covid-19
    United States / US
    United Kingdom / UK
    European Union / EU
    China Communist Party
    Technology
    Alibaba
    Uighur
    Forced labour
    2022 Winter Olympics


    People in this episode:
    Rui Zhong
    Emily Tamkin
    Jeremy Cliffe
    Xi Jinping
    Joe Biden
    Donald Trump
    Ted Cruz
    Kevin McCarthy
    Dr. Li wenliang
     
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    • 32 min
    The Transatlantic Relationship

    The Transatlantic Relationship

    In the week when Germany's governing party, the Christian Democratic Union (CDU), elected Armin Laschet as its new leader, and Joe Biden was inaugurated as the 46th president of the United States, Jeremy Cliffe and Emily Tamkin are joined on World Review by Constanze Stelzenmüller, Fritz Stern Chair on Germany and Transatlantic Relations at the Brookings Institution. In this episode, they discuss what these new appointments mean for the future of relations between Europe and the US, and how the rise of China will play out for the transatlantic alliance.


    We'd love to hear from you! Send us your You Ask Us questions at youaskus.co.uk. Find us on Twitter: @jeremycliffe and @emilyctamkin.


    Subscribing to the New Statesman helps us keep producing this podcast. You can now subscribe for 12 weeks for just £12. Visit newstatesman.com/subscribe12


    More audio from the New Statesman: listen to our twice-weekly UK politics podcast The New Statesman podcast


    If you are a New Statesman digital subscriber you can get ad-free access to this podcast by visiting newstatesman.com/nssubscribers.
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 41 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
57 Ratings

57 Ratings

Jediknightkevin ,

excellent podcast

really good podcast from NS. Informative but accessible. The hosts and guests are very good. Would firmly recommend for finding out about world affairs from centre left perspective

edoardofortese ,

A clear and concise take on world affairs

This is a really interesting and incisive take on the major issues in world affairs; it manages to be concise but expansive, detailed without being overwrought. Emily and Jeremy are great hosts whose questions lead to fascinating discussion with a range of equally fascinating guests.
I’m hooked.

Rabbitsrule ,

Another voice

A great podcast alongside the NS itself. Jeremy (where’s he been recently?), Emily and guests have the time and space to cover issues properly. It has been very America-centered recently due to the election, hopefully it will go back to world coverage again.

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