176 episodes

World Review is the global affairs podcast from the New Statesman, hosted by Jeremy Cliffe in Berlin and Emily Tamkin in Washington D.C.
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World Review from the New Statesman The New Statesman

    • News
    • 4.6 • 83 Ratings

World Review is the global affairs podcast from the New Statesman, hosted by Jeremy Cliffe in Berlin and Emily Tamkin in Washington D.C.
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    China’s broken promises on Hong Kong, with Chris Patten

    China’s broken promises on Hong Kong, with Chris Patten

    It is twenty-five years since the handover of Hong Kong from British to Chinese rule in 1997, when Beijing promised that Hong Kongers’ freedoms would be protected for 50 years. Katie Stallard speaks to Lord Patten, the last British governor of the territory from 1992-1997, about his new book, The Hong Kong Diaries.
    They discuss his dealings with the Chinese Communist Party, the failure to foresee Beijing’s crackdown on civil liberties in Hong Kong and his belief that Hong Kong might change China more than China would change Hong Kong. Also, the folly of the so-called “Golden Era” of UK-China relations under David Cameron, and what he really thinks of Boris Johnson.
    If you have a You Ask Us question for the international team, email podcasts@newstatesman.co.uk.
    Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.
    Further reading:
    The betrayal of Hong Kong
    Hong Kong’s authoritarian future is already here.
    China doesn’t just want to be part of the global order – it wants to shape it.

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    • 34 min
    BONUS EPISODE: Will the world end its addiction to growth? With the Club of Rome

    BONUS EPISODE: Will the world end its addiction to growth? With the Club of Rome

    In 1972 the Club of Rome published the Limits to Growth report: a pioneering document on the extent to which the Earth's natural resources can support rates of industrialisation and population growth.
     
    Now, 50 years on, we consider the impact of that report and what is happening to create a new social and economic paradigm that will help the global population live in tune with the environment.
     
    The New Statesman's environment editor, Philippa Nuttall, is joined in Brussels by Kate Raworth, the economist who created the concept of "Doughnut Economics"; Tim Jackson, a British economist from the University of Surrey; and Sandrine Dixson-Declève, co-president of the Club of Rome.
     
    This special edition of World Review is produced with support from the Club of Rome and the BMW Foundation.


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    • 31 min
    Why is Europe facing a summer of discontent?

    Why is Europe facing a summer of discontent?

    Strikes across Europe have thrown the continent into chaos just as summer travel takes off. Emily Tamkin, Alona Ferber and Alix Kroeger discuss what is driving workers across the public sector to take to the picket line, and they speculate where the “summer of discontent” is headed.
    In Israel, the coalition government has dissolved, prompting the fifth election in almost four years, and giving Israel’s longest-serving prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu another shot at returning to power. The team discuss what finally brought the “government of change” to its knees, if it indeed did bring about any change, and what the election means for Netanyahu.
    Then in You Ask Us, a listener asks how the UK views the rising tide of Islamophobia in India.
    If you have a You Ask Us question for the international team, email podcasts@newstatesman.co.uk
    Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.
    Further reading:
    Emily Tamkin on India's diplomatic dilemma over war in Ukraine.
    Alona Ferber writes Israel's double standard on flag-waving is a risk to democracy.
    Anoosh Chakelian on why rail strikes are testing the Tory's culture war on working at home.

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    • 24 min
    Is Emmanuel Macron to blame for the rise of the far right? | France Elects

    Is Emmanuel Macron to blame for the rise of the far right? | France Elects

    In the final episode of this series of France Elects Ido Vock, Europe correspondent, is joined by the New Statesman’s writer-at-large Jeremy Cliffe to digest France’s legislative election, at which Emmanuel Macron’s party failed to win a majority and Marine Le Pen’s far-right National Rally had its best ever result. Macron will now be the first president in 20 years to govern without a parliamentary majority.
    They discuss whether Macron and his party could have done more to prevent the far right winning so many seats, what the next few years has in store for France and whether forcing the executive to work with other factions could benefit the country’s political culture.
    Further reading:
    Emmanuel Macron falls to earth
    France’s Jupiter may be about to discover a culture of compromise
    In the long shadow of De Gaulle
    Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.

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    • 24 min
    How Nato can protect Ukraine, with Anders Fogh Rasmussen

    How Nato can protect Ukraine, with Anders Fogh Rasmussen

    With Russia’s invasion of Ukraine heading towards its fifth month, Europe correspondent Ido Vock speaks to the former Nato general secretary Anders Fogh Rasmussen.
    They discuss what else can be done to support Ukraine, what form security guarantees for a neutral Ukraine might look like, and why democracies need to stand up to autocrats.
    Further reading:
    Europeans were united in support of Ukraine, but that consensus is fraying.
    The war in Ukraine should have strengthened Europe’s common voice. Why hasn’t it?
    Vladimir the Great


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    • 18 min
    Was Angela Merkel too easy on Russia?

    Was Angela Merkel too easy on Russia?

    On 7 June, the former German chancellor Angela Merkel appeared at a speaking event at a Berlin theatre, to discuss how she has spent the past six months since leaving office and reflect on present politics. Jeremy Cliffe in Berlin joins Emily Tamkin and Katie Stallard in Washington DC to assess Merkel’s defiant stance on her policies towards Moscow and ask whether we should reappraise her international legacy. Could she have done more to prepare Germany, Ukraine and the rest of Europe for Russia’s invasion?
    Meanwhile, in a speech in Moscow on 9 June, Vladimir Putin compared himself to Peter the Great and his leadership during Russia’s Great Northern War against Sweden. He claimed that the imperialist, who ruled tsarist Russia from 1682 to 1725, was “returning and reinforcing” Russian land, and “it fell to us to return and reinforce as well”. The team discuss this troubling historical comparison and why so many commentators appear reluctant to believe that Putin does not envisage a future for Ukraine as a sovereign state.
    Then, in You Ask Us, a listener notes that unlike other networks Fox News did not air the first public hearing on the Capitol riot that shocked America and the world on 6 January 2021. The listener asked how concerned we should be that a major news network is helping to create an alternative reality for a significant portion of the US.
    If you have a You Ask Us question for the international team, email podcasts@newstatesman.co.uk
    Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.
    Further reading:
    Jeremy Cliffe writes that Angela Merkel’s self-justification over Russia does not add up
    Katie Stallard on Vladimir the Great


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    • 30 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
83 Ratings

83 Ratings

MattDoman ,

Great Podcast

One of my favourite podcasts, if not my favourite. Great guests, hosts, insight, analysis and it’s always fun to hear the question that you submitted at the end. 😊👍

Steetwise ,

The ‘Climate Crisis’ & anti-popularism book club…

…chatter-chatter with the ladies who stress about the climate & ‘popularism’. Regretfully a pod where those elitist college educated London living lovie ladies are allowed too much time around the mic without proper supervision. I’ve recently started listening to another NS pod, but the repeated & false emphasis (dragged in to conversation at every opportunity, regardless the topic) on ‘climate science’ & beating the far-right - its always the FAR right but never the FAR left, hmmm liberal-elite conspiracy? I wonder - proved that I would learn nothing new from this pod. Nurse! Nurse! I think less hysterical voices are needed here…(maybe a man in the room too would help?)

Andy White, York ,

Shallow warmongers get predictable

Started getting these to follow the German elections, but never learnt anything from them that I hadn’t already picked up elsewhere. Now I’m cancelling my subscription amid the war in Ukraine. What is the point of Russophobic guest after Russophobic guest, and so-called analysis that again and again does absolutely nothing to challenge prevailing assumptions? What are they trying to do, who are they trying to convince with their endless repetition of already-ubiquitous official narratives? That’s not what podcasts should be about. No thanks.

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