15 episodes

Boston Children’s Answers: Raising Celiac is a monthly podcast from the Celiac Disease Program at Boston Children’s Hospital dedicated to raising the standard of education, awareness, and research on celiac disease and related autoimmune conditions. In each episode, the program’s education director, Vanessa Weisbrod, speaks with national and international experts about the complexities of this chronic genetic condition and its connection to many other autoimmune diseases.

Every episode of the Boston Children’s Answers: Raising Celiac podcast is accredited by Boston Children’s Continuing Education Department for 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits ™ for physicians, 0.5 contact hours for nurses, 0.5 ACE CE continuing education credits for social workers, and 0.5 CEUs for registered dietitians.

Boston Children’s Answers: Raising Celiac Boston Children's Hospital

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.8 • 20 Ratings

Boston Children’s Answers: Raising Celiac is a monthly podcast from the Celiac Disease Program at Boston Children’s Hospital dedicated to raising the standard of education, awareness, and research on celiac disease and related autoimmune conditions. In each episode, the program’s education director, Vanessa Weisbrod, speaks with national and international experts about the complexities of this chronic genetic condition and its connection to many other autoimmune diseases.

Every episode of the Boston Children’s Answers: Raising Celiac podcast is accredited by Boston Children’s Continuing Education Department for 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits ™ for physicians, 0.5 contact hours for nurses, 0.5 ACE CE continuing education credits for social workers, and 0.5 CEUs for registered dietitians.

    Best Practices in Biopsies for Celiac Disease

    Best Practices in Biopsies for Celiac Disease

    This episode of the Raising Celiac Podcast looks at best practices in biopsies for celiac disease. Historically, confirmatory biopsies were obtained from the distal duodenum only, rather than the duodenal bulb. However, researchers have observed that some patients with celiac disease have histopathologic mucosal changes limited to the duodenal bulb only. This subtype, called isolated bulb celiac disease, has been estimated to occur in up to 12% of individuals diagnosed with celiac. Thus, to improve the sensitivity of biopsies in diagnosis, updated pediatric and adult guidelines now recommend obtaining both duodenal bulb and distal duodenum biopsies.

    But how can delayed diagnosis be prevented in the future? Do endoscopists need to separate the biopsies into separate containers for pathology review? Does isolated blub celiac disease relate at all to the levels of ttg antibodies in the blood? We'll discuss this and more on this episode of Raising Celiac.

    Thank you to the Global Autoimmune Institute and the Celiac Disease Foundation for their support to make this podcast possible.

    References:
    Behl S, et al. The characteristics of isolated bulb celiac disease in children. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. 2023;77:79.

    • 32 min
    Advocacy in Celiac Disease

    Advocacy in Celiac Disease

    Advocacy efforts can lead to the development of legislation and regulations that protect the rights and well-being of people with celiac disease. This includes advocating for accommodations in schools, workplaces, and public spaces to ensure a safe and inclusive environment for those with celiac disease. Advocacy can also greatly impact research and disease understanding when it leads to increased funding for scientists. But how can patients and doctors be involved in advocacy efforts in a productive way? Should everyone start calling their members of congress, or are there coordinated national efforts to join?

    We’ll discuss this and more on this episode of Raising Celiac.

    Thank you to the Global Autoimmune Institute for their support to make this podcast possible.

    CME Credits: dme.childrenshospital.org/raisingceliac
    Advocacy Website: https://iadvocate.celiac.org

    • 30 min
    If You Can’t Afford Gluten-Free Food, You Can’t Treat Celiac Disease

    If You Can’t Afford Gluten-Free Food, You Can’t Treat Celiac Disease

    Food insecurity is a massive problem in the celiac disease community. Currently there is no treatment for celiac disease except for the gluten-free diet. Without access to gluten-free food, there is no treating this autoimmune disease. A recent study from Boston Children’s Hospital found that 24% of pediatric celiac patients experienced general food insecurity during the COVID-19 pandemic and that when asked specifically about gluten-free food, 27% of the patients screened positive for food insecurity. Another study found that one in six patients with celiac disease are food insecure.

    So, how can medical providers support patients with celiac disease who can’t afford gluten-free food? What are the best practices for clinic-based screening? What resources are available to actually help patients if they screen positive?

    We’ll discuss this and more on this episode of Raising Celiac.

    Thank you to the Global Autoimmune Institute for their generous support to make this podcast possible.

    • 47 min
    Could a Drug Cure Celiac Disease?

    Could a Drug Cure Celiac Disease?

    There are a number of drugs in clinical trials for celiac disease. Some of them are designed to help patients with ongoing symptoms of celiac disease. Others will protect against small amounts of gluten cross contact. And, one could allow individuals with celiac to eat a normal gluten-containing diet. But, how far away are these drugs from being approved by the FDA? Will they be available to all patients with celiac disease? Will you need biopsy confirmed celiac to take the drugs? How can patients join these clinical trials to help researchers learn about how well the drugs might work? We'll discuss this and more with Dr. Jocelyn Silvester, Director of Research from the Boston Children's Hospital Celiac Disease Program and hear from a patient who recently participated in a trial.

    Thank you to the Global Autoimmune Institute for their generous support to make this podcast possible.

    • 50 min
    The Burden of Living with Crohn’s and Celiac Disease

    The Burden of Living with Crohn’s and Celiac Disease

    Studies have largely debated the extent of the connection between Crohn’s disease and celiac disease, but all conclude that Crohn’s is more common in those with celiac than in the general population. Overlapping symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea, iron deficiency anemia, and short stature. A diagnosis of celiac disease or inflammatory bowel disease alone can be life altering and a difficult adjustment for children, adolescents, and their families. Diagnosed together, it’s even more challenging. So, how can a medical team help young adults living with both conditions have a positive quality of life? How are the treatments for Crohn’s different than the treatment for celiac disease with a gluten-free diet? Do Crohn’s symptoms come and go, or once treated, stay away? What do researchers know about the genetics of these diseases and the likelihood of passing them on to future children? We’ll discuss this and more on today’s episode of Boston Children's Answers: Raising Celiac.

    The Boston Children's Answers: Raising Celiac is made possible by the generous support of the Global Autoimmune Institute.

    • 54 min
    Laws and Regulations that Govern Celiac Disease

    Laws and Regulations that Govern Celiac Disease

    There are approximately 74 million school-age children in the United States alone, thus an estimated 740,000 school children who require a gluten-free diet for celiac disease. Celiac can cause significant effects on children and their families, as well as on the school they attend. We know that many children and teens do not follow a strict gluten-free diet and most often consume gluten-containing foods during meals with peers. Kids also risk being exposed to gluten at lunch time, during class celebrations and cross-contact with gluten-containing materials like Playdoh, paper maché, art supplies, science experiments, and cooking classes.

    So, how do parents know which type of plan their child should have to accommodate their needs at school? What do they do if the school is unwilling to set up a 504 plan? Where do they turn to for help? What should a child with celiac disease expect in the school environment? We’ll discuss this and more on this episode of Boston Children's Answers: Raising Celiac.

    The Boston Children's Answers: Raising Celiac Podcast is made possible by the generous support of the Global Autoimmune Institute.

    • 52 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
20 Ratings

20 Ratings

SRRpod ,

Incredibly helpful

It’s so hard to find credible information and advice to support my child with celiac. This has opened a new door for me.

VanessaMW ,

Love the patient cases and stories

Absolutely love the format and stories used to highlight these complex issues related to celiac disease.

LuckyMaMaNY ,

Very clear and detailed

As a mom of celiac kid, I find this podcast extremely helpful in breaking down the complexity of celiac disease in very clear terms.The podcast provides accurate information and the latest research. I also appreciate the real-life case studies to appreciate that no one is going through this alone. Thank you!

Top Podcasts In Health & Fitness

Huberman Lab
Scicomm Media
The School of Greatness
Lewis Howes
On Purpose with Jay Shetty
iHeartPodcasts
Nothing much happens: bedtime stories to help you sleep
iHeartPodcasts
Ten Percent Happier with Dan Harris
Ten Percent Happier
The Dr. John Delony Show
Ramsey Network

You Might Also Like