41 episodes

in pursuit of meaning (philosophy and psychology)

Eternalised eternalised

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in pursuit of meaning (philosophy and psychology)

    The Plague in 10 Minutes | Albert Camus

    The Plague in 10 Minutes | Albert Camus

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    The Plague was published in 1947 and is widely considered as Albert Camus’s most successful novel. It tells the story of a plague epidemic in the Algerian coastal town of Oran, where thousands of rats are found dead all over the city.  

    Camus’ absurdist philosophy is at the background of the novel. He stresses the powerlessness of the individual to affect his destiny in an indifferent world.   

    Illness, exile, and separation are themes that were present in Camus’ life and his reflections upon them form a vital counterpoint to the allegory. This makes his description of the plague and the pain of loneliness exceptionally vivid and heartfelt.

    #camus 


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    The Metamorphosis in 10 Minutes | Franz Kafka

    The Metamorphosis in 10 Minutes | Franz Kafka

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    The Metamorphosis is a book written by Franz Kafka and published in 1915. It has been called one of the seminal works of fiction of the 20th century as well as a classic absurdist fiction novella.  

    It starts off with one of the most iconic opening lines in literature: “As Gregor Samsa awoke one morning from uneasy dreams he found himself transformed in his bed into a monstrous vermin.”  

    Franz Kafka's Metamorphosis embodies an absurdist tone with ordinary daily concerns (such as being late for work) even after Gregor Samsa's extraordinary transformation into a monstrous vermin. It is an allegory of modern society's alienation and angst. The story mostly takes place in a single confined room.   

    The cause of Gregor’s transformation is never revealed, and Kafka himself never gave an explanation.


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    The Eternal Recurrence | Friedrich Nietzsche

    The Eternal Recurrence | Friedrich Nietzsche

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    The eternal recurrence is a central notion of Nietzsche’s thought. It supposes that you’d have to experience the same life, with the same events and same experiences, repeated for eternity.   

    Nietzsche suggests that most people would consider this a curse and that it would require the most impassioned love of life: to crave nothing more fervently than this ultimate eternal confirmation and seal.  

    The idea is horrifying and paralysing as it carries the burden of the “heaviest weight” imaginable. However, it is also the ultimate affirmation of life, it is the rock the fills the emptiness and weightlessness void of nihilism.

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    #nietzsche


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    • 13 min
    The Gay Science in 10 Minutes | Friedrich Nietzsche

    The Gay Science in 10 Minutes | Friedrich Nietzsche

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    The Gay Science is one of Nietzsche’s most beautiful and important books. He describes it as “the most personal of all his books”.   Gay Science has the overtones of a light-hearted defiance of convention; it suggests Nietzsche’s “immoralism” and his “revaluation of all values”. 

    In Nietzsche’s own words, one must strive to be an “artistic Socrates”, a philosopher with both an intellectual conscience and with a feeling for art.  The book contains Nietzsche’s first proclamation of the death of God, as well as the eternal recurrence. 

    It also contains some of his most sustained discussions on knowledge and truth, the intellectual conscience, and the miseries that accompany religion and morality, warning us against the “preachers of morality”.


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    • 10 min
    Nausea in 10 Minutes | Jean Paul Sartre

    Nausea in 10 Minutes | Jean Paul Sartre

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    Jean Paul Sartre’s first novel, Nausea, gave a name for existential angst. He considered it as one of his best works. It is a philosophical novel with existentialist vibes, that delves into the pure absurdity of the world with Sartre's wild imagination and explores the randomness and superfluity of the world.   Some of the most important themes include the sensation of "nausea", contingency, freedom, bad faith and Sartre's philosophical idea of existence precedes essence.

    #existentialism #sartre


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    • 10 min
    The Antichrist in 10 Minutes | Friedrich Nietzsche

    The Antichrist in 10 Minutes | Friedrich Nietzsche

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    The Antichrist was written in 1888 one year before Nietzsche’s descend into madness and immediately after his Twilight of the Idols. Both books should be read under the aspect of the last words of his final original book, his autobiography Ecce Homo: “Dionysus against the Crucified.”  

    The German title can be translated as either “The Anti-Christ” or “The Anti-Christian”. It was likely meant to mean both. Dionysus has two opponents, one worthy of him, the other unworthy.  

    The name Nietzsche gives to his worthy opponent is Christ – hence Dionysus is the Anti-Christ.   “In reality there has been only one Christian, and he died on the Cross.” – The Antichrist §39  

    As Nietzsche discusses Christ, the tone becomes ever warmer and even ecstatic. It becomes one of the most moving and powerful parts of the book.  

    The unworthy opponent is the Christian, who is undeservedly dignified by being treated to such elaborate condemnation.   The book is directed to a minority and is relatively short composed of 62 sections, mainly devoted to attacking Christianity in its institutional form.


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    • 10 min

Customer Reviews

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1 Rating

Blake and Spencer Get Jumped ,

Solid show!

Really liked the breakdown of famous thinkers. Honestly felt like a great classroom experience. However, just wish there was an intro.

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