25 episodes

Petey Mesquitey is KXCI’s resident storyteller. Every week since the spring of 1992 Petey has delighted KXCI listeners with slide shows and poems, stories and songs about flora, fauna, and family and the glory of living in southern Arizona.

Growing Native with Petey Mesquitey Petey Mesquitey

    • Education
    • 5.0 • 32 Ratings

Petey Mesquitey is KXCI’s resident storyteller. Every week since the spring of 1992 Petey has delighted KXCI listeners with slide shows and poems, stories and songs about flora, fauna, and family and the glory of living in southern Arizona.

    Goodding Willow by a Pond in the Hills

    Goodding Willow by a Pond in the Hills

    Leslie Newton Goodding had a busy career. It was when he worked for the U. S. Department of Agriculture that he collected the type specimen for the willow jabbered about in this episode. It was the American botanist Carleton Roy Ball, a Salix specialist (geek), who honored Goodding with the species name.
    One of the things that caught my attention when reading about Leslie Goodding was that at some point he taught High School in Bisbee, as well as Benson. I bet those teaching gigs supported his plant explorations around southern Arizona.
    There are a bunch of Salix spp. in Arizona. My Arizona Flora (1960) lists 16 species and I get a kick out of a more current reference that says “nearly 20 species.” So who knows? I do know that Goodding willow is the most common willow in the southwest and found along streams, meadows, ponds, and wet places below 7,500 ft.
    The photos are mine of Salix gooddingii by a pond and in glorious fall foliage.

     
     

    • 4 min
    Sara's Onion

    Sara's Onion

    It was the American botanist Soreno Watson, that named the onion collected in Tanner’s Canyon of the Huachuca Mountains to honor Sara Plummer Lemmon. He made no mistake who it honored by using her maiden name, Allium plummerae.
    Common names of this borderlands native are Tanner’s Canyon onion, Plummer’s onion or around our place we call it Sara’s onion.
    I thought I had some photos of Sara’s onion (Allium plummerae) taken at Onion Saddle in the Chiricahuas, but I couldn’t find them. (Why do I think they are 35 mm slides?) Instead I offer the cover of the book The Forgotten Botanist by Wynne Brown. It’s recommended reading.

    • 4 min
    Canyon Tree Frog

    Canyon Tree Frog

    After reading the section about the canyon tree frog (Hyla arenicolor) in my old Field Guide to Western Reptiles and Amphibians by Robert Stebbins, I had to read it aloud to you. Doesn’t it just make you want to get out and find canyon tree frogs? Stebbins not only wrote the field guide, but did all the illustrations as well. And if your interest is piqued, there is an updated 2018 edition.
    Two other valuable field guides for us herpers, expert and otherwise. (I’m the latter)
    A Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptile in Arizona, Holycross, Brennan, Babb. This one rides in our truck.
    Arizona’s Amphibians and Reptiles, A Natural History and Field Guide, John C, Murphy and others This one I pull off the shelf when I get home.
    Kids, collect the whole set!

    The photos are mine.

    • 4 min
    Dancing on Rocky Slopes

    Dancing on Rocky Slopes

    I guess to truly be a fandango I would need a partner and maybe some castanets, but the loose rock fandango can get pretty elaborate with elements of modern dance, hokey pokey, ballet and of course, some jazz hands thrown into the mix. The expression “dance like no one is watching’’ comes to mind and I certainly hope so.
    The photos are mine. I thought you’d like to see the fraction of the Galiuro Mountains (Galuros!) I poke around in. Shin daggers are Agave schottii and the photo is of a very small clump. Multiply those by several hundred thousand and you get an idea of what you’re hiking in on many mesas and slopes. Yikes and ouch!
    But hey, walking slowly and observing the flora, fauna, geology and distant vistas is the most wonderful thing. Life is beautiful. Yeah, it is.

    • 4 min
    Asclepias lemmonii

    Asclepias lemmonii

    It’s fun to have favorite plants to look for on excursions into the hills. Looking back at photos and my notes, we have been checking on this particular population of Lemmon’s milkweed for a few years. I’m guessing that as long as we’re in the area, we’ll continue to stop by for a visit. And yes, I did grab a couple seed pods (follicles) from a plant. Stay tuned.
    Botanical names of plants are usually followed by the name of who named it…the author citation. The genus Asclepias is followed by an L. That’s Linnaeus. And if one looked through the numerous species names (200 plus), after tuberosa you see the citation L. Someone sent Linnaeus a dry specimen of a North American milkweed and Carl named it. So he is cited for both the genus Asclepias and the species tuberosa. But listen, it was the famous American botanist of the 1800s, Asa Gray that honored the husband wife botanists John and Sara Lemmon with the name lemmonii, for the species jabbered about in this episode, Asclepias lemmonii. Yay!
    The photos are mine.


     

    • 4 min
    Condalia correllii in the Borderlands

    Condalia correllii in the Borderlands

    What a fun discovery in the desert east of Douglas, Arizona. There is just something about these large spinescent shrubs in the buckthorn family, Rhamnaceae. I love Condalia warnockii and friends who frequent the western deserts of Arizona love Condalia globosa…okay, me too. And now I’m adding Condalia correllii to my favorite spinescent shrub list.
    And hey, it was a guess, but yes the specific epithet correlli is named for botanist Donovan Stewart Correll. Oh, and as far as wondering whether Antonio Condal and Jean Pierre Florens knew of one another,  (what was that about?) well, only if either one could time travel.

    The photos are mine and taken on the day described in this episode. Check out the spines. Ouch!

    • 4 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
32 Ratings

32 Ratings

manlike. ,

Happy Holidays.

Thanks for all the good words. With all the contagious crap going around—your enthusiasm is infectious in a good way.

Misti L. ,

Lovely Lyrical Episodes

So glad to have to discovered this podcast/radio show this year. I love the natural history missives Petey shares and I look forward every week to hearing what he has to say about nature every week.

hvaldez1 ,

My Favorite Podcast

I am always exited when a new episode pops up. The love you have for nature and the way you share your love is unique. Thank you.

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