42 episodes

It was a global race that led to the largest mass vaccination campaign in American history. What comes after a COVID-19 vaccine? Track the Vax, a weekly podcast from MedPage Today, returns for Season 2 to continue to examine the "New Normal" brought about through the global vaccination effort, continued vaccine development, research and impact from the vaccine rollout. Hosted and produced by medical correspondent Serena Marshall, with Executive producer health journalist Lara Salahi this podcast is devoted to the science and a data driven look at what comes next.

TRACK THE VAX MedPage Today

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.6 • 62 Ratings

It was a global race that led to the largest mass vaccination campaign in American history. What comes after a COVID-19 vaccine? Track the Vax, a weekly podcast from MedPage Today, returns for Season 2 to continue to examine the "New Normal" brought about through the global vaccination effort, continued vaccine development, research and impact from the vaccine rollout. Hosted and produced by medical correspondent Serena Marshall, with Executive producer health journalist Lara Salahi this podcast is devoted to the science and a data driven look at what comes next.

    S02-15: COVID-19 Vaccines: What Does the Future Hold?

    S02-15: COVID-19 Vaccines: What Does the Future Hold?

    We did it all. We social distanced, masked, got vaccinated, masked some more, and got boosted. But still, with Omicron -- a much more contagious variant spreading like wildfire -- infections are at an all-time high.
    There remain more than 100 different vaccines in human trials and development for COVID-19, from protein subunits to inactivated coronavirus vaccines, as well as another 70-plus in animal trials.
    So, is boosting with our existing authorized vaccines going to be our "new normal?" Or, are there new vaccines still in development that would allow us to truly be "one and done."
    On this week's episode, Dial Hewlett Jr., MD, the medical director for Westchester County, New York, and deputy to the commissioner for the Westchester County Department of Health, joins us to explain what future vaccines are coming down the pike and where research will lead us.

    • 20 min
    S02-14: How Do We Treat Long COVID?

    S02-14: How Do We Treat Long COVID?

    Millions of Americans are experiencing chronic, lingering, and debilitating symptoms months after recovering from COVID-19. The symptoms of so-called long COVID range from breathing problems to memory impairment, making it difficult for clinicians to pinpoint the syndrome and who may be at highest risk.
    The NIH has directed $1 billion toward studying the syndrome, and some hospitals, including pediatric hospitals, have opened centers to research and care for patients experiencing long COVID.
    On this week's episode, Jonathan Whiteson, MD, medical director of cardiac and pulmonary rehab at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City, and spokesperson for the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, joins us to explain how long COVID is being detected and treated, and the new guidance for physicians.

    • 20 min
    S02-13: Under the Microscope: How Sequencing Plays Pandemic Detective

    S02-13: Under the Microscope: How Sequencing Plays Pandemic Detective

    The longer the COVID-19 epidemic persists the more likely we are to see more super-spreader events, even among those vaccinated, and possibly by variants not yet identified.
    Health experts have already worked to help prevent and treat COVID – but say there's more we need to do to track individual cases and community spread.
    On this week's episode, John Connor, MD, an associate professor and researcher at the National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories at Boston University, joins us to explain how they track the introduction of COVID and remnants of COVID infections over time.

    • 22 min
    S02-12: What to Expect When We're Expecting More Omicron Cases

    S02-12: What to Expect When We're Expecting More Omicron Cases

    Omicron has reached the U.S., and widespread vaccination may not be enough to keep the new variant from spreading. The variant is expected to outpace Delta in the coming weeks, with more than 30 states having now reported a case.
    On this week's episode, Abraar Karan, MD, MPH, an infectious disease physician at Stanford University, joins us to explain all we know -- and still don't -- when it comes to this new variant.

    • 22 min
    S02-11: Psychological Barriers May Lead to COVID Vaccine Refusal

    S02-11: Psychological Barriers May Lead to COVID Vaccine Refusal

    wo years into the COVID-19 pandemic -- and 1 year after vaccines first became available -- there are still those who are opting out of getting vaccinated.
    Deep distrust in government and science are among the reasons that some are continuing to hold out on the shots. But experts suggest that there are psychological barriers that may have nothing to do with mistrust. To understand all of the factors at play, we need to first recognize how the mind processes the act of making a decision -- whether it is to opt in or out.
    On this week's episode, Gretchen Chapman, PhD, department head of social and decision sciences at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, joins us to help us understand the psychology behind COVID vaccine refusal.

    • 20 min
    S02-10: Does a Past COVID Infection Protect Just as Well as Vaccines?

    S02-10: Does a Past COVID Infection Protect Just as Well as Vaccines?

    COVID booster shots are now recommended for millions of Americans, prompting questions on why immunity acquired from the vaccines is waning so soon.
    Anthony Fauci, MD, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has hinted that periodic booster shots against COVID are likely here to stay, and may redefine what it means to be "fully vaccinated."
    While natural immunity from previous COVID infection is of scientific interest, it's also a political talking point that some have seized on to sidestep vaccination.
    What does the science show when it comes to the duration of natural immunity? And how does natural immunity compare to vaccine-acquired immunity?
    On this week's episode, Bob Wachter, MD, of the University of California San Francisco, answers questions about immunity and how to stay protected.

    • 21 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
62 Ratings

62 Ratings

1xznnnb ,

Refreshing approach to questions and answers

Serena asked the obvious questions that people want answers for but are usually ignored in favor of political ones. Finally a place to hear understandable science from people using common sense and not afraid of admitting they don’t know everything. Having an MD and PhD and teaching residents for 40 years I appreciate the lack of arrogance and posturing so often encountered with interviews of the “experts”.

AnimlNitr8 ,

Mandates

Jacobson wasn’t required to take the smallpox vaccine. He was required to pay a $5 fine. SCOTUS also ruled that “the principle of compulsory vaccination, validated under Jacobson v. Massachusetts, was broad enough to allow for a woman's Fallopian tubes to be cut” (in the name of public health, no less). Should we go back to forcibly sterilizing people in the name of “public health” too? “It’s my job to protect every American.” No one can physically protect every American from every eventuality or from communicable illnesses (and neither can vaccines), so no one has any right to mandate vaccines. No one has any right to be free from communicable illnesses. Nature doesn’t work that way and neither do vaccines. People certainly do have the right to make personal medical decisions without coercion or penalty though. How did we get to the point of government making personal risk assessments for us and punishing us if we decide differently in our own personal risk assessment? We got here by fundamentally forgetting the purpose and process of government in the first place. Why does government exist? To secure and defend our natural rights. That’s it. That is its only legitimate purpose. But that’s not what they’re saying. They’re saying their “first job is to keep us safe.” It’s true that there’s overlap between securing our rights and keeping us safe. Intervening to stop a murder does both, for example, but which one is actually more important? They can lock you up in a padded cell and it would work to keep you safe, at least from most of life’s physical dangers, but if you’d say they’d be wrong to do that…WHY? If it’s their “first job to keep you safe,” there’s nothing wrong with them locking you up. In fact, it’s totally effective. It’s only wrong if there’s a higher moral value beyond keeping you safe. And what would that be? It would be respecting your right to be free, and to assess life’s risks for yourself. This only ends when we say it ends. It only goes back to normal when we say it goes back to normal. And that only happens when we take rightful control of our own lives for ourselves, using the one word that every tyrant is eventually forced to understand: NO.

Dots Me ,

Johnson & Johnson

Where can I find J & J vaccine near me
92583 Riverside county

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