168 episodes

Every week Lochhead on Marketing ™ examines the mindset & strategies required to win.



This podcast is for executives and entrepreneurs who value counterintuitive marketing approaches coupled with category design and category creation strategies.



Host Christopher Lochhead is a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO, host of “100 Outstanding” podcast “Follow Your Different”, Amazon #1 bestselling author of “Niche Down” and “Play Bigger”. The Marketing Journal calls him “one of the best minds in marketing”, NBA Legend Bill Walton calls him a “quasar” and The Economist calls him “off-putting to some”.

Lochhead on Marketing Christopher Lochhead

    • Business
    • 4.7 • 185 Ratings

Every week Lochhead on Marketing ™ examines the mindset & strategies required to win.



This podcast is for executives and entrepreneurs who value counterintuitive marketing approaches coupled with category design and category creation strategies.



Host Christopher Lochhead is a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO, host of “100 Outstanding” podcast “Follow Your Different”, Amazon #1 bestselling author of “Niche Down” and “Play Bigger”. The Marketing Journal calls him “one of the best minds in marketing”, NBA Legend Bill Walton calls him a “quasar” and The Economist calls him “off-putting to some”.

    16 Learnings From Marketing Legend George Lois

    16 Learnings From Marketing Legend George Lois

    The Wall Street Journal says, “George Lois is the one the only prodigy or fathead, founder of agencies, creator of Legends, George Lewis is a genuine advertising superhero”. George Lois is well known if not famous for designing culture, changing cover images for Esquire magazine, and his “call your cable company and tell them I want my MTV”. That campaign made the music video category and made MTV the Category King. In his life and career, he broke every rule, created legendary categories and brands, and he did it in a brash, bold, exciting way.



    Sadly, we recently lost this legend at 91 years old. George Lois died just three months after his beloved wife, Rosemary died. And he is one of my heroes, a man that so many of us in marketing owe so much. And yet, most young people in entrepreneurship, marketing and creative endeavors and design. Don't really know of him. But if you've ever done anything in entrepreneurship in category design or marketing, that breaks boundaries, you're following in George's footsteps, and you might not even know it.



    Today, let's dig into some of George's life's teachings. Because if you want to become legendary, you have to study the legends.



    Welcome to Lochhead on Marketing. The number one charting marketing podcast for marketers, category designers, and entrepreneurs with a different mind.

    George Lois and a Damn Good Advice

    George Lewis was born in June 1931, and he passed in November 2022. And it is said that in the end, we are all remembered for two dates, and a dash. And I'm here to tell you that George made some legendary shit out of his dash.



    I want to focus on a book of his called Damn Good Advice for People with Talent, How to unleash your creative potential by America's master communicator, George Lois. If you have not read this book yet, I would suggest you do so.



    What I want to share with you are some of the learnings from this book – not all of them, but some of them that really have spoken to me over the years and made a big difference for me that I think might make a big difference for you.

    Force a Choice

    Idea number one is to Force a Choice. At the very beginning of damn good advice, George says this:



    “There are only four types of person you can be: one, very bright, industrious, [your perfect]. Two, very bright lazy [a damn shame]. Three, stupid lazy, you'll sit on your ass, so you're a wash. And four, stupid industrious [uh oh, you're dangerous]. If you're a number one or a number two, you'll get a lot out of this book, if you're number three, or number four, why you reading this book?” – George Lois



    So right off the top and this landmark piece of work by George, he's doing what legendary brands do, which is they attract who they are for, and they repel who they are against. Legendary brands force a choice, not a comparison. And best I can tell, that's how George lived his life.

    You are who you are

    Big Idea number two: Around here, we would express it as Follow Your Different. In George words, he writes:



    “Whether you're male, female, black, Hispanic, Native American, Asian, ethnic, or gay, and wherever you work, you are who you are. And that's what you are, and be damn proud of it. Don't change your name. Don't change your accent, don't change your heritage, don't denigrate a humble upbringing. Be true to yourself, and you'll ring true to the world.” – George Lois



    To learn more about the different teachings of George Lois, download and listen to this episode.

    Bio

    George Lois

    Links

    Learn more about George Lois



    Website | Wiki | Books

    • 31 min
    How to be a Legendary Creator/Writer: Sachit Gupta & Christopher Lochhead Unpack #1 Bestseller Snow Leopard

    How to be a Legendary Creator/Writer: Sachit Gupta & Christopher Lochhead Unpack #1 Bestseller Snow Leopard

    Recently, I was a guest with the legendary Sachit Gupta on his fantastic podcast called Conscious Creators, which I highly recommend. During our conversation on his podcast, we unpack Category Pirates’ most recent book Snow Leopard. Our producer Jason DeFilippo heard this podcast and thought it'd be a great idea to drop it here for you.



    What you're about to hear is me and Satya go deep on what it takes to be a successful native digital creator slash writer.



    Welcome to Lochhead on Marketing. The number one charting marketing podcast for marketers, category designers, and entrepreneurs with a different mind.

    The Reason for Podcasting

    The conversation starts off with a discussion of how the two first met, and it was through the legendary podcaster Jordan Harbinger. Christopher was looking into getting sponsors and thinking about was to monetize his podcast, and was recommended to Sachit Gupta this way.



    While he did get ideas on different styles of monetization, the biggest thing that Christopher got out of the conversation was the realization that monetization was not his primary focus on doing podcasts.



    “I sort of had this aha that said, “Hey, wait a minute, dude, this was actually never about money”. And if I want to make money, I know how to go do that. So you sort of set my head straight, and that the emphasis was on the wrong syllable that if I wanted to make money, I knew how to go make money in a way that was much more exponential than being essentially an ad salesperson.

    The real gift you gave me around podcasting, was that I’m not doing this to monetize.”

    – Christopher Lochhead



    Sachit Gupta on Monetizing Directly vs Indirectly

    One of the things that Sachit wanted to share was that one doesn’t have to monetize directly. Focus on making good content first and foremost, so that you can reach out and cultivate an audience naturally, rather than going for cookie-cutter approaches for a short-term viral status.



    “Here's what I see happening in this greater world right now: there's a stat that I think like 75% of youngsters want to be YouTubers, and the path most of them see in front of them is go on YouTube or something else and create content that's for the extremes, because that's what spreads. And then once you chase views and get to a certain level of audience, you can monetize in some way, right. And if you don't become big, you can't monetize. In your book, you call like the obvious content, which is not really the stuff that's useful.”

    – Sachit Gupta



    While there is merit to uploading consistent content, you don’t have to flood your audience with bit-sized content that is just a big nothing burger. Creating meaningful content, let’s say once every week or two is way better than just dropping portion-sized content that just adds to the collective brain-rot of society.

    The Content Pyramid

    The topic then shifts to the concept of the content pyramid, and what types of people thrive in each level.



    Consumers, for example, are at base of the pyramid and consists of the largest section of it. In internet culture, there is something known as the 1% rule, which states that on social media platforms, 1% create while 99% consume.



    Most people spend their entire lives being content consumers—not content creators. And that’s totally fine, so long as you understand you’re not “playing the game.” You’re sitting on the sidelines watching the game.



    In order to “get in the game,” you must move out of consumption and up The Content Pyramid.



    To hear more of the conversation between Sachit Gupta and Christopher Lochhead, download and listen to this episode.

    Bio

    Sachit Gupta

    Connect with Sachit Gupta!

    a href="http://sachit.

    • 1 hr 37 min
    Pause for Democracy

    Pause for Democracy

    In observance of the Midterm Elections in the United States, we will not be dropping full normal episodes of Lochhead on Marketing this week. And if you are American, I do hope you get out and vote. It is, in my opinion, one of the most patriotic things you can do.



    I also just wanted to read you a little something that I wrote recently on LinkedIn that I think is germane. Because whatever happens in the American midterms, roughly 50% of the country is going to be elated, and 50% of the country is going to be pissed. So let me do a little reading for you here.



    “Today, more Americans hate more Americans than ever. And yet, we all know hating someone because they disagree with you might be the biggest stupid of them all. So how did this happen in the oldest surviving democracy in human history?

    It’s because politicians, media, and social media, on both sides, create hate. Politicians, media, and social media, on both sides. monetize hate. We took the bait and internalize the hate, but it's not too late.

    We can start really thinking. We can start really dialoguing. We can start really making a difference. American on American hate stops with us. This is something every American can be a leader on, and frankly, everybody in the world can be a leader on. American on American hate stops with us. God bless America and God bless the world."

    • 1 min
    How To Think Like A Category Designer | Category Pirates

    How To Think Like A Category Designer | Category Pirates

    What percentage of the total value created in any given market category goes to the category designer or leader? That was a question that we had several years ago. And we thought there would be research about that. Well, when we were writing Play Bigger, we couldn't find that data. So we had to create it. The number has been an extraordinary insight. It turns out that the company that wins the category earns 76% of the total value created in the space, as measured by market cap and or valuation. And that insight was so compelling, we actually published it in the Harvard Business Review.



    On this episode, let's dig into how you could be that person. How do you be that company that earns that 76%? Or seven another way? What are the different ways that category designers, the people who create and dominate new market categories think and become the one who earns that 76%?



    Welcome to Lochhead on Marketing. The number one charting marketing podcast for marketers, category designers, and entrepreneurs with a different mind.

    Category Design is a Game Of Thinking

    Thinking about thinking is the most important kind of thinking for a Category Designer.



    You are responsible for changing the way a reader, customer, or consumer “thinks.” You are successful when you’ve moved their thinking from the old way to the new and different way you are educating them about.



    But what is “thinking?”



    According to Roger Martin, arguably the world’s #1 management thinker, “thinking” is when you look at the world through an existing model. It’s how you use learnings from the past to make sense of the present. So when another driver cuts you off on the highway, you apply your past experiences to the present and swerve on reflex.



    But almost all thinking is “reflexive” rather than “reflective.”



    Consider the difference we laid out in our mini-book The Art of Fresh Thinking:



    * “Reflexive” thinking: Having an unconscious “reflex” in response to ideas or opinions.

    * “Reflective” thinking: Taking a moment to consciously reflect on how the past may have created a preexisting mental model keeping you from considering a new and different future.



    Reflexive thinking causes a scarcity of fresh thinking in the world because it relies on mental scaffolding built in the past.



    Some of the smartest people stopped reflective thinking a long time ago. We would even go so far as to say that being declared a smart person is almost certain to make you stupid. Because when you get called “smart,” you become entrenched in your comfortable past. When you’re smart, you know things. And most people who know things are called “experts.” Which means they already know. And when you already know, by definition you are using old mental scaffolding to consider new and different futures.



    Which makes you stupid.



    So, don’t strive to become an expert (ever!)—it’s the enemy of fresh thinking.

    Here’s How a Category Designer Thinks

    You are presented with information.



    You become conscious of which model you are using to evaluate the information (which “lens” you are looking through).



    And then before you react, respond, or give in to your reflexive nature, you pause and first consider which mental model you’re using to examine the information being presented. You train yourself to be curious, to ask why, to suspend your past opinions, beliefs, and mental models, and to open the aperture of your mind and consider something different.



    That’s “thinking.”



    Our friend, Mike Maples Jr.,

    • 20 min
    PR / Communications: A Very Different Point-of-View

    PR / Communications: A Very Different Point-of-View

    On this episode of Lochhead on Marketing, let's talk about public relations/communications, and a very different point of view about that. In particular, why your content is your marketing.



    Towards the end, we'll talk about five easy steps to consider when building your own direct audience, and bypassing the legacy publications: the old-school, dusty gatekeepers.



    Welcome to Lochhead on Marketing. The number one charting marketing podcast for marketers, category designers, and entrepreneurs with a different mind.

    The Problem with Legacy Media

    This episode is inspired in part by a conversation I had with a CEO friend, which I then posted on LinkedIn. It reads:



    A CEO friend just asked me, if he should go to a PR/Marketing smooze event with the legacy business media. Here’s my advice.

    (Warning: I’m biased. But for a reason) The bulk of legacy media is a waste of time.

    I used to write for many of the biggest legacy business media outlets. Stopped 5+ years ago, because a) (almost) no one reads it and b) it is mostly clickbait. No one reads Forbes fortune Fast Company, Inc, etc. anymore.



    Your best ROI will come from building your own media and thought leadership. And the AHA here is every company needs to be a media company.

    Playing Both Sides

    Another issue is that even as these legacy media have gone digital, they still rely on cookie cutter strategies and clickbait-y articles. They play the SEO game to keep their websites on top of searches, and then have companies pay to be featured as top so-and-so in a category.



    Some even go as far as charging subscription to access their media, which is a whole other reason why people don’t read their stuff anymore. You pay to get the “information”, only to find out that it’s something you can probably read 2 lines down the search results.



    Essentially, they are trying to get revenues from both sides of the process, which will eventually lead to burning both ends of the stick faster. They are still clinging to traditional ways, which shows even when they went digital.

    Go Direct to the Source

    So rather than subscribing to “publication lists” that doesn’t really net you any traffic, it’s best to do it in-house and go direct to the source by tapping into the digital market itself.



    You can start small with building up channels in various social media platforms, and promoting your content and linking back to your website if they are interested for more. At the very least, you now have a platform to actively engage your audience, and get a pulse of what works and what doesn’t, and go from there.



    To find out the other steps in doing better PR and communications on your own, download and listen to this episode.

    Bio

    Christopher Lochhead is a #1 Apple podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger.



    He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur.



    Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist.



    In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard acquired the company in 2006, for $4.5 billion.



    He also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD; the founding CMO of Internet consulting firm Scient, and served as head of marketing at the CRM software firm Vantive.



    We hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing!

    • 14 min
    Adobe is Smart & Wall Street is Dumb: Why the $60B Figma Acquisition is Legendary Category Design

    Adobe is Smart & Wall Street is Dumb: Why the $60B Figma Acquisition is Legendary Category Design

    On September 15 2022, Adobe announced it was buying startup Figma for 20 billion US dollars. This is one of the largest private company purchases in Silicon Valley history. They paid approximately 50 times Figma’s 2022 revenue, and Wall Street hated it.



    Skeptics are saying that Adobe paid an "astronomical price" for a company projected to book only 400 million in ARR annualized reoccurring revenue this year. And this is exactly what people who do not understand how categories work. The “experts” on Wall Street when deals like this go down, are almost always wrong.



    Welcome to Lochhead on Marketing. The number one charting marketing podcast for marketers, category designers, and entrepreneurs with a different mind.

    Wall Street Mercenaries

    Let’s start off with an interesting tidbit that I experienced by interacting with Wall Street.



    As I was doing a little bit of consulting and insulting back then, a group approached me about their matchmaking service. Simply put, they would match executives and experts to Wall Street folks, and they pay for your time so they could ask you questions and advise on certain things.



    The idea intrigued me, so I signed up for it. But it turns out, the Wall Street guys only wanted to ask for speculations and opinions on certain company’s performance and how it would affect the market, what stocks were going to tank, etc.



    The AHA here is that most people (this is a generalization) in Wall Street are mercenaries. They're looking to make money in the now term, short term. They don’t create a significant value in the economy. They just try to anticipate what might happen tomorrow, so that they can play a financialization game.



    While there are exceptions to this, it’s generally the perception most people have of them.

    How to Confuse a Wall Street Folk

    As we’ve discussed before, there are two kinds of acquisition deals when you look at them from the high level. There are consolidation deals and acceleration deals.



    Consolidation deals happen when a certain company is not growing anymore, and their solution for it is to merge with another company to get a bigger share of the market and look like they have “growth”. Value investors like the Wall Street folks typically thrive and look out for such deals, as it fulfills their requirements for “growth” and revenue increase.



    Acceleration deals is when a company acquires another because they see value on it once they have developed it. They company or IP they purchased may not have a huge valuation at the moment, but it could be a gold mine for them once it is fully fleshed out.



    Acceleration deals tend to confuse Wall Street folk, as they are focused in the “now”, and could not fathom the significance of such a deal entails, unless it affects the current quarter. Hence, they do not understand what Adobe did, which is why they hate it.



    To hear more about the Adobe deal and why Wall Street folks hate it, download and listen to this episode.

    Bio

    Christopher Lochhead is a #1 Apple podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger.



    He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur.



    Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist.



    In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard acquired the company in 2006, for $4.5 billion.



    He also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD; the founding CMO of Internet consulting firm Scient, and served as head of marketing at the CRM software firm Vantive.

    • 19 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
185 Ratings

185 Ratings

Dan1777999877 ,

Fantastic!

Lochhead on Marketing has quickly become a favorite in my feed! I'm consistently impressed by the engaging conversations, insightful content, and actionable ideas. I truly learn something every time I listen!

Facqt Media ,

I will be listening!

This podcast is like having a marketing coach for free! I love how generous Christopher and his guests are in sharing their knowledge and expertise. They give practical advice. Insightful!

D1315 ,

Brilliant

I stumble upon new podcasts all the time. This is the first one, in the last year plus, that I genuinely get value from. In fact, I hit rewind frequently so I can stop and take notes.

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