167 episodes

Welcome to the Mad in America podcast, a new weekly discussion that searches for the truth about psychiatric prescription drugs and mental health care worldwide.

This podcast is part of Mad in America’s mission to serve as a catalyst for rethinking psychiatric care. We believe that the current drug-based paradigm of care has failed our society and that scientific research, as well as the lived experience of those who have been diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder, calls for profound change.

On the podcast we have interviews with experts and those with lived experience of the psychiatric system. Thank you for joining us as we discuss the many issues around rethinking psychiatric care around the world.

For more information visit madinamerica.com
To contact us email podcasts@madinamerica.com

Mad in America: Rethinking Mental Health Mad in America

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.6 • 96 Ratings

Welcome to the Mad in America podcast, a new weekly discussion that searches for the truth about psychiatric prescription drugs and mental health care worldwide.

This podcast is part of Mad in America’s mission to serve as a catalyst for rethinking psychiatric care. We believe that the current drug-based paradigm of care has failed our society and that scientific research, as well as the lived experience of those who have been diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder, calls for profound change.

On the podcast we have interviews with experts and those with lived experience of the psychiatric system. Thank you for joining us as we discuss the many issues around rethinking psychiatric care around the world.

For more information visit madinamerica.com
To contact us email podcasts@madinamerica.com

    Oryx Cohen and Briza Gavidia - Emotional CPR - Heart-Centered Peer Support

    Oryx Cohen and Briza Gavidia - Emotional CPR - Heart-Centered Peer Support

    In this podcast we discuss an educational program called Emotional CPR (eCPR), a form of peer support anyone can use to assist youth (or adults) in emotional crisis.
    Our guests are Oryx Cohen and Briza Gavidia of the National Empowerment Center, a Massachusetts-based nonprofit whose mission is to carry a message of recovery, empowerment, hope, and healing to people with lived experience with mental health issues, trauma, and/or extreme states.
    Oryx Cohen, M.P.A., is a leader in the international mental health consumer/survivor/ex-patient (c/s/x) or Mad Pride movement. Currently, Oryx is NEC’s Chief Operating Officer. Among other responsibilities, he organizes the national Alternatives Conference every three years and assists states that have an underdeveloped consumer/survivor voice to find that voice and then work toward transforming their mental health systems to become peer-driven and recovery-oriented. Oryx is also a lead trainer for Emotional CPR, or eCPR, and has conducted over 50 eCPR trainings around the world.
    Prior to joining NEC, Oryx was Co-Director of the Western Massachusetts Recovery Learning Community. There, he helped to spearhead an innovative peer-run approach focusing on recovery, healing, and community. Oryx is also the co-founder of Freedom Center, the Pioneer Valley’s only independent peer-run support/activist organization.
    Briza Gavidia is a certified Youth Emotional-CPR (eCPR) Educator. She is 21 years old and is a student at Fullerton College majoring in sociology. Briza is currently employed in a program assisting the elderly with daily activities. Her goal is to work in the mental health field so she can give young people real hope for a better future. She loves sharing her lived experiences with trauma and how she is tackling these challenges so she can become a stronger person.

    • 38 min
    Elisa Lacerda-Vandenborn - How Western Psychology Can Rip Indigenous Families Apart

    Elisa Lacerda-Vandenborn - How Western Psychology Can Rip Indigenous Families Apart

    Elisa Lacerda-Vandenborn is a professor at Werklund School of Education at the University of Calgary, Canada. She is currently part of several national and international research projects examining education in indigenous communities and the decolonization of mental health. Her writings explore alternate ways of understanding human suffering, challenge the dominant psychiatric worldview, and critique the Euro-American understandings of distress and disease.
    Her interests include understanding different ideas of self, especially in indigenous communities, and how our ignorance about these differences harms people we say we are healing.
    Lacerda-Vandenborn notes that “Psychology is not a very reflective discipline.” This is a conversation about lost indigenous children, psychology’s blind spots, and how we can address these concerns with epistemic humility.

    • 43 min
    Renee Schuls-Jacobson – Psychiatrized: Waking up After a Decade of Bad Medicine

    Renee Schuls-Jacobson – Psychiatrized: Waking up After a Decade of Bad Medicine

    On the Mad in America podcast this week, we hear from Renee Schuls-Jacobson. Renee was a teacher for two decades and she is now an author, artist, advocate and coach. In this interview, we discuss her book Psychiatrized: Waking up After a Decade of Bad Medicine which was released this year.
    The book is a beautifully written account of Renee's experiences being prescribed the benzodiazepine clonazepam (Klonopin) for seven years. It talks of her experiences taking the drug as prescribed but perhaps more importantly, also tells of what happened to Renee as she made attempts to withdraw.

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Giovanni Fava - A Different Psychiatry is Possible

    Giovanni Fava - A Different Psychiatry is Possible

    In this podcast, we hear from the renowned clinician and researcher Dr. Giovanni Fava. Dr. Fava is a psychiatrist and professor of clinical psychology at the University of Bologna in Italy. He is also a clinical professor of psychiatry at the University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Since 1992, he has been the editor-in-chief of the peer-reviewed medical journal Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics.
    Dr. Fava has authored more than 500 scientific papers and is known for researching the adverse effects of antidepressant drugs. In a 1994 editorial, he argued that many of his fellow psychiatrists were too hesitant to question whether a given psychiatric treatment was more harmful than it was helpful.
    He recently released his latest book entitled “Discontinuing Antidepressant Medications” published by Oxford University Press. The book is designed to be a guide for clinicians who want to help patients withdraw from antidepressants.
    In this interview, we discuss the new book, approaches to antidepressant cessation and explore some of the concepts including novel psychotherapeutic approaches to withdrawal.

    • 54 min
    Hans Skott-Myhre - Can Critiques of Psychiatry Help us Imagine a Post-Capitalist Future?

    Hans Skott-Myhre - Can Critiques of Psychiatry Help us Imagine a Post-Capitalist Future?

    Hans Skott-Myhre is a Professor of Human Services at Kennesaw State University in Kennesaw, Georgia. Over the last 50 years, he has worked within a wide variety of human service settings, including residential homes, community health centers, inpatient psychiatric units, homeless youth shelters, transitional living programs, and prisons. About two decades ago, he transitioned into academia, where he now does research at the intersections of human services, psychology, cultural theory, and literature.
    His recently published book titled “Post-Capitalist Subjectivity in Literature and Anti-Psychiatry: Reconceptualizing the Self Beyond Capitalism” explored how we might be different types of people if we didn't live in a capitalist society. The book draws on Marxist and post-Marxist theory and presents a nuanced analysis of antipsychiatrists' professional writings, including Franco Basaglia and R. D. Laing, as well as the work of fiction writers, including Franz Kafka and Gabriel García Márquez. Through this analysis, Skott-Myhre identifies alternative conceptualizations of self and community that take us beyond capitalist subjectivity.

    • 1 hr 2 min
    Shira Collings - New Perspectives on Eating Disorders

    Shira Collings - New Perspectives on Eating Disorders

    In this podcast, which comes on the heels of reports linking social media use to reduced self-esteem in teen girls, eating-disorders therapist Shira Collings discusses person-centered, socio-culturally aware approaches to dealing with disordered eating and other food-related challenges in youth (and adults).
    Shira Collings, M.S., N.C.C., is Mad in America’s Assistant Editor for MIA Continuing Education and the Youth Coordinator for the National Empowerment Center. She received her B.A. in Communication from the University of Pennsylvania and an M.S. in Counseling and Psychology from Troy University.
    As a person with lived experience of recovery from diet culture, disordered eating, and trauma, Shira is passionate about supporting others in finding freedom with food, body acceptance, and the ability to be their full, authentic selves and live according to their values. She is an advocate for trauma-informed, person-centered approaches to mental health care.

    • 52 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
96 Ratings

96 Ratings

One yogi ,

The future of integrated well-being

Chances are if you or a loved-one have encountered mental challenges, you or the loved-ones have been on anti-depressents, mood modulators or anti-psychotics. And these pharmaceuticals may have appeared to work...for a while. You may even have been temporarily grateful. But many people get on these medicines and stagnate or feel worse with new symptoms developing and become stuck. Stuck with a label; Stuck in bad social systems; Stuck on medicines that stop helping and stuck in a system that is propped up by so-called experts who would like the system to continue regardless of the true data and people’s experiences on these drugs.

I am a part of the Prozac Generation and we are speaking up. No more. Count me as one amongst your army speaking up for change. Silent No More.

pompe2 ,

No Longer useful content

Used to be a favorite but the continued push towards Marxist ideas and social justice ideology is not useful.

djleinin ,

Response to Anne Guy

Balance. She is so very wrong. There is actual science that looks at the brain, it’s chemicals, physiology, etc. Why can’t even professionals see the obvious need for a balanced, full four circles approach of biology, psychology, social, and spiritual? Why are people putting each other against one another when there is actual data and science that specifies that there are multiple approaches needed to help brain health. And, like every medical issue, it’s always better to use natural, non-pharmaceutical approaches when possible.

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