240 episodes

Welcome to the Mad in America podcast, a weekly discussion that searches for the truth about psychiatric prescription drugs and mental health care worldwide.

Hosted by James Moore, this podcast is part of Mad in America’s mission to serve as a catalyst for rethinking psychiatric care. We believe that the current drug-based paradigm of care has failed our society and that scientific research, as well as the lived experience of those who have been diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder, calls for profound change.

On the podcast we have interviews with experts and those with lived experience of the psychiatric system. Thank you for joining us as we discuss the many issues around rethinking psychiatric care around the world.

For more information visit madinamerica.com
To contact us email podcasts@madinamerica.com

Mad in America: Rethinking Mental Health Mad in the World

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.5 • 139 Ratings

Welcome to the Mad in America podcast, a weekly discussion that searches for the truth about psychiatric prescription drugs and mental health care worldwide.

Hosted by James Moore, this podcast is part of Mad in America’s mission to serve as a catalyst for rethinking psychiatric care. We believe that the current drug-based paradigm of care has failed our society and that scientific research, as well as the lived experience of those who have been diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder, calls for profound change.

On the podcast we have interviews with experts and those with lived experience of the psychiatric system. Thank you for joining us as we discuss the many issues around rethinking psychiatric care around the world.

For more information visit madinamerica.com
To contact us email podcasts@madinamerica.com

    Madness, Utopia and Revolt: An Interview With Sasha Warren

    Madness, Utopia and Revolt: An Interview With Sasha Warren

    Sasha Durakov Warren is the author of the new book Storming Bedlam: Madness, Utopia, and Revolt published by Common Notions Press. Sasha is a writer based in Minneapolis. His experiences within the psychiatric system and a commitment to radical politics led him to co-found the group Hearing Voices - Twin Cities, which provides an alternative social space for individuals to discuss often stigmatized, extreme experiences and network with one another.
    Following the George Floyd uprising in 2020, he founded the project Of Unsound Mind to trace the histories of psychiatry, social work, and public health's connections to policing, prisons, and various disciplinary and managerial technologies.
    ***
    Thank you for being with us to listen to the podcast and read our articles this year. MIA is funded entirely by reader donations. If you value MIA, please help us continue to survive and grow.
    To find the Mad in America podcast on your preferred podcast player, click here
    © Mad in America 2024. Produced by James Moore

    • 51 min
    Demedicalizing Depression: An Interview with Milutin Kostić

    Demedicalizing Depression: An Interview with Milutin Kostić

    Milutin Kostić is a practicing Serbian psychiatrist trained in the tradition of biological psychiatry who has become a new figure in the critical psychiatry movement. Affiliated with the Institute of Mental Health in Belgrade, Serbia, he is currently a Fulbright scholar working alongside Lisa Cosgrove in Boston to challenge established norms in psychiatry and psychology.
    Kostić utilizes his extensive training and traditional research methods to question the fundamental assumptions of his field. For example, Kostić critiques the flawed premises of genetics research in depression, arguing that it overlooks the heterogeneity of human experience. He uses analogies to illustrate how psychiatry often pathologizes normal human emotions, drawing parallels to how medical conditions are misunderstood when the context is ignored, like trying to treat the lungs alone in a society overrun by air pollution.
    We will also discuss his latest study, which emphasizes the benefits of de-medicalizing experiences of depression rather than quickly resorting to diagnoses and subsequent treatments with medication or psychotherapy. His research also sheds light on the effects of biological narratives on patient perspectives, the complexities of drug dependency, and the profound impact of psychiatric diagnoses on individual identity.
    ***
    Thank you for being with us to listen to the podcast and read our articles this year. MIA is funded entirely by reader donations. If you value MIA, please help us continue to survive and grow.
    To find the Mad in America podcast on your preferred podcast player, click here
    © Mad in America 2024. Produced by James Moore

    • 42 min
    Leaving Biological Psychiatry Behind - An Interview With Rodrigo Nardi

    Leaving Biological Psychiatry Behind - An Interview With Rodrigo Nardi

    Rodrigo Nardi is a psychiatrist and psychologist. He obtained his psychology degree in the year 2000, and following that, he obtained a certificate in CBT, and a Master’s Degree in Clinical Psychology at Universidade Evangélica de Paraná. He obtained his M.D. degree in 2010, and in 2016, he completed his psychiatry residency at Penn State. Altogether, Dr. Nardi has worked as a Mental Health Professional for more than 20 years, covering from individual psychotherapy to inpatient and outpatient psychiatry, substance use treatment, and interventional psychiatry. His passion for teaching and learning has led to the creation of the True Psychiatry Network and the development of a mentoring program designed to address the most frequent challenges related to psychiatric training.
    ***
    Thank you for being with us to listen to the podcast and read our articles this year. MIA is funded entirely by reader donations. If you value MIA, please help us continue to survive and grow.
    To find the Mad in America podcast on your preferred podcast player, click here
    © Mad in America 2024. Produced by James Moore

    • 42 min
    Context and Care vs Isolate and Control - An Interview with Arthur Kleinman

    Context and Care vs Isolate and Control - An Interview with Arthur Kleinman

    Arthur Kleinman is a towering figure in psychiatry and medical anthropology. He has made substantial contributions to both fields over his illustrious career spanning more than five decades.
    As a Professor of Medical Anthropology at Harvard University's Department of Global Health and Social Medicine and a Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, Kleinman has profoundly influenced how medical professionals understand the interplay between culture, illness, and healing. His extensive body of work includes seminal books and numerous articles that have become foundational texts in medical anthropology. These writings explore the crucial role of personal and cultural narratives in shaping medical practices and patient care.
    In recent years, Kleinman has increasingly focused on critiquing the prevailing practices within psychiatry, particularly the over-medicalization of mental health issues and the neglect of broader social and personal contexts that significantly impact patient care. His critiques advocate for a more nuanced and compassionate approach to psychiatry, one that recognizes the importance of individual patient stories and the socio-cultural dimensions of mental health.
    In this interview, Kleinman explores critical issues facing modern healthcare. He discusses the often-overlooked narrative of patient experiences, critiques the mechanistic approaches that dominate U.S. healthcare, and offers insightful reflections on the global mental health movement.
    ***
    Thank you for being with us to listen to the podcast and read our articles this year. MIA is funded entirely by reader donations. If you value MIA, please help us continue to survive and grow.
    To find the Mad in America podcast on your preferred podcast player, click here

    • 44 min
    Undisclosed Financial Conflicts of Interest in the DSM-5: An interview with Lisa Cosgrove and Brian Piper

    Undisclosed Financial Conflicts of Interest in the DSM-5: An interview with Lisa Cosgrove and Brian Piper

    On the MIA podcast this week we turn our attention to conflicts of interest (COIs) and new research from the British Medical Journal (BMJ). Mad in America has previously examined the problems with conflicts of interest in research but this time we extend that to look at the potential effect of COIs on diagnostic tools such as the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM).
    Joining me today are Lisa Cosgrove and Brian Piper, two of the authors of a paper which appeared in the BMJ. The paper is entitled “Undisclosed Financial Conflicts of Interest in the DSM-5 TR: Cross-Sectional Analysis,” and it was published in January 2024.
    ***
    Thank you for being with us to listen to the podcast and read our articles this year. MIA is funded entirely by reader donations. If you value MIA, please help us continue to survive and grow.
    To find the Mad in America podcast on your preferred podcast player, click here

    • 25 min
    Deprescribing Psychiatric Drugs to Reduce Harms and Empower Patients - Swapnil Gupta

    Deprescribing Psychiatric Drugs to Reduce Harms and Empower Patients - Swapnil Gupta

    Swapnil Gupta is an Associate Professor and Medical Director of Ambulatory Psychiatry at Mount Sinai Morningside Hospital. She was trained as a psychiatrist in India and the United States, at SUNY Downstate Medical Center and Yale University, and PGI Chandigarh in India. She is known for her work on deprescribing from and discontinuation of psychiatric drugs.
    Dr. Gupta’s career began with research on the role of the endocannabinoid system in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia as an academic psychiatrist. Her subsequent scholarship has focused on applying deprescribing, the systematic reduction of unnecessary medications, to psychiatry by rooting it in the principles of recovery-oriented care. She has authored several peer-reviewed papers on deprescribing and co-authored a book with Rebecca Miller and John Cahill.
    She is an active member of two organizations that aim to enhance stakeholder engagement in psychiatric research. She is also a part of the editorial board of the Community Mental Health Journal. Currently, she is working on creating educational resources to help people discontinue psychiatric medications and gathering information on the knowledge and opinions of psychiatrists regarding the discontinuation of such drugs.
    In this interview, we discuss deprescribing from psychiatric drugs, the difficult decisions faced by patients, the importance of psychosocial support during withdrawal, and how deprescribing is central to recovery-oriented practices such as shared decision and patient choice. We will also tackle the complex issue of whether the recurrence of symptoms once a drug is tapered is a mark of relapse or withdrawal caused by the psychiatric medication.
    ***
    Thank you for being with us to listen to the podcast and read our articles this year. MIA is funded entirely by reader donations. If you value MIA, please help us continue to survive and grow.
    To find the Mad in America podcast on your preferred podcast player, click here

    • 38 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
139 Ratings

139 Ratings

+ORBIT ,

Outstanding

When you hear the truth, you know it. It resonates deep inside. Every word of every podcast is an amazing journey. Into the world of truth and hope for our society. This podcast has changed my life.

One yogi ,

The future of integrated well-being

Chances are if you or a loved-one have encountered mental challenges, you or the loved-ones have been on anti-depressents, mood modulators or anti-psychotics. And these pharmaceuticals may have appeared to work...for a while. You may even have been temporarily grateful. But many people get on these medicines and stagnate or feel worse with new symptoms developing and become stuck. Stuck with a label; Stuck in bad social systems; Stuck on medicines that stop helping and stuck in a system that is propped up by so-called experts who would like the system to continue regardless of the true data and people’s experiences on these drugs.

I am a part of the Prozac Generation and we are speaking up. No more. Count me as one amongst your army speaking up for change. Silent No More.

Bunny Cub ,

Manic depression and melancholia

Were described long before there were drug companies. Lithium as a treatment for manic depression was discovered by a doctor trying to help suffering people.

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