33 episodes

In today's busy society, people aren't typically thinking about aging or elder care. By 2030, there will be more older adults than children under age 5 for the first time in human history. Here's a fantastic podcast with different topics ranging from clinical care of older adults to things that family caregivers need to know. Hosted by Dr. Melissa Batchelor (MelissaBPhD) 'This Is Getting Old' highlights all of the things we need to do to create an age-friendly world - because when things are age-friendly, they are friendly for everyone.

MelissaBPhD's podcast Melissa B PhD

    • Science
    • 5.0 • 6 Ratings

In today's busy society, people aren't typically thinking about aging or elder care. By 2030, there will be more older adults than children under age 5 for the first time in human history. Here's a fantastic podcast with different topics ranging from clinical care of older adults to things that family caregivers need to know. Hosted by Dr. Melissa Batchelor (MelissaBPhD) 'This Is Getting Old' highlights all of the things we need to do to create an age-friendly world - because when things are age-friendly, they are friendly for everyone.

    Voting with Alzheimer's Disease

    Voting with Alzheimer's Disease

    Should a person with Alzheimer’s disease be allowed to vote? 

    The majority of people living with Alzheimer's disease live at home with family or have friends who help provide care. These family and friends may need to help the person living with dementia to vote, so in this week’s episode, we will review some things to think about when helping someone to vote. 

    Tune into the full episode to learn more!

    • 9 min
    Nursing Homes and Families During COVID

    Nursing Homes and Families During COVID

    Nursing Homes and Families During COVID
    “If the nursing home would allow one advocate, one compassionate care person, and let them visit their family members, that would be very helpful to them.”— Nettie Batchelor
    Skilled nursing homes are currently facing unique challenges with coronavirus. Previously, we talked about the role of social workers in nursing homes and mental health. In this week's episode, we're going to have a heart-to-heart conversation with my Mom, Nettie Batchelor. We're going to share her story about the impact of the visitation restrictions she’s faced with my grandmother, Grandma Trudie, who lives in a nursing home.
     
    Part One of ‘Nursing Homes and Families During COVID’
    When Grandma Trudie went to the nursing facility, it was hard for her to leave her home and accept the fact that she needed 24/7 care; care that had to be provided in a skilled nursing home. Thankfully, the staff who work in her facility treat her very well. She began to even think of it as home. My Mom used to see her two or three times a week. The last time my Mom saw her face-t0-face was March 4th, 2020 - that was the last time she was able to sit beside her for a visit or give her a hug. 
    Visitation guidelines issued by CMS and its federal partners have issued directives and guidance regarding visitation during the pandemic in multiple documents that have made it challenging for nursing homes to meet (and CMS to enforce) federal expectations or leverage evolving flexibility with states re-opening at different paces.
    “The longer this pandemic takes, the more bad outcomes we're going to see.” — Melissa Batchelor, PhD, RN, FNP, FAAN 
     Visitation Restrictions may have partially helped protect resident’s physical health, residents are experiencing loneliness, anxiety, and depression because they have been separated from family and friends longer than any other group of people in the United States during COVID.
    My Mom appreciates everyone in the facility doing their best to help her remain socially connected through video calls, but honestly, when you’re 91 years old, time is even important than it’s ever been. In September of 2020, 
    the Governor of North Carolina moved the state to Phase 2.5 - allowing outdoor visitation with nursing home residents.  So after 202 days, my mother’s brother was allowed to visit my grandmother two and a half weeks after that Phase 2.5 announcement. It did not go well.  Grandma Trudi completely lost it; because of the social distancing rules, she wasn’t allowed to hug or even touch my Uncle so she started crying and begging to go home. She kept saying, "That's my son, that's my son!"  She got so upset, the staff had to ask my Uncle and his wife to leave. You can imagine how hard it is to finally be able to see each other again, but you can’t hug or even touch the other person after SEVEN MONTHS.
    Part Two of ‘Nursing Homes and Families During COVID’
    If you're curious about what else is going on with older adults inside the nursing homes, all of their activities have been shut down and she’s in her room alone for the majority of the day. Unable to even move around in her wheelchair led her to become very deconditioned. Through her Medicare benefit, they finally allowed physical therapists back in the facility to work with the residents. She will get two months of physical therapy to get her moving again. 
    “There definitely needs to be answers and solutions for family members to be able to go in to visit.” —  Melissa Batchelor, PhD, RN, FNP, FAAN 
    Some residents quit eating; others started to eat more. My grandmother is eating more. She's gained 10 pounds. You think she's doing fine, but the reality is she's eating out of loneliness and unhappiness. She's not the kind of person who cries a lot or easily gets upset about her situation. She tries t

    • 25 min
    EP31: Mental Health and Older Adults: Important Concerns and Future Directions

    EP31: Mental Health and Older Adults: Important Concerns and Future Directions

    Mental Health and Older Adults: Important Concerns and Future Directions
    “Both older adults and younger folks die by suicide, which is why mental health is a big public health issue that is often underfunded.” — Luming Li, M.D.
    One of the top leading causes of death in America is suicide - making mental health a critical topic. In this week's episode, we are joined by Luming Li, M.D., and Michael Schoenbaum, Ph.D., who are helping to advance the work of prevention of mental health conditions.
    Part One of ‘Mental Health and Older Adults: Important Concerns and Future Directions’
    Luming Li, M.D. is an Assistant Professor at the Yale School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, and currently serves as the Associate Medical Director of Quality Improvement of the Yale New Haven Psychiatric Hospital. Her clinical focus is on patients with severe psychiatric conditions that require complex systems of care. 
    She works clinically as an inpatient psychiatrist at the transitional age, dual-diagnosis psychiatric/substance disorder units at the Yale New Haven Psychiatric Hospital, and serves as a consultant psychiatrist in the Nathan Smith Clinic for patients with HIV. She has research and educational interests in healthcare policy, hospital management, clinical redesign, leadership development, operational efficiency, and quality improvement. 
    Dr. Li completed a 7-year B.A./M.D. program at Rutgers/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and residency training at the Yale School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry. She has also served on national committees within the American Psychiatric Association (APA), including the Health Systems and Financing Committee (2017-2018), and was an APA Public Psychiatry Fellowship recipient. She is a 2019-2020 Health and Aging Policy Fellow and American Political Science Association Congressional Fellow.
    Michael Schoenbaum (PhD in Economics, University of Michigan, 1995) is Senior Advisor for Mental Health Services, Epidemiology, and Economics in the NIMH's Division of Services and Intervention Research. He conducts analyses of public health and mental health service issues in support of Institute decision-making. He works to strengthen NIMH's relationships with public and private stakeholders to increase the public health impact of NIMH-supported research. He has worked extensively on expanding and improving identification and treatment of suicide risk; on improving treatment for behavioral health issues in general medical settings, and on broader implementation of the evidence-based Collaborative Care model to do so, and on facilitating the adoption of coordinated specialty care for early psychosis. Before joining NIMH in 2006, Dr. Schoenbaum was a Robert Wood Johnson Scholar in health policy at the University of California, Berkeley, from 1995-1997, and an economist at the RAND Corporation from 1997-2014 (adjunct 2006-2014).
    Part Two of ‘Mental Health and Older Adults: Important Concerns and Future Directions’
    Many suicides are associated with mental health and/or substance use conditions; we might all wish for better treatments. But for now, from public health or a clinical care perspective, we have to work with the treatments that exist. 
    There's a national conversation about the need for better mental health and substance use care because everybody is concerned that the pandemic might be increasing risk. However, the conversation may also represent an opportunity to do better in ways that we could or should have pursued before the pandemic. There are different steps and components to zero suicide, but how do we measure that it's being implemented? Everything must be aligned with the evidence.
    Due to science development, there are now many ways to find people with suicide risk, which is essential because we can't help them if we can't find them. There are approaches to us

    • 47 min
    The Role of Social Workers in Nursing Homes

    The Role of Social Workers in Nursing Homes

    Nursing homes and COVID-19 are today's hot topics. With mounting cases of COVID-19,  nursing homes have faced many challenges, especially with providing social services. On top of helping older adults adjust to their new life in a supportive care setting and advocating for their rights and needs, social workers are faced with ethical dilemmas, stress, and fears for resident safety. What can we do about it? https://melissabphd.com/podcast-blog/

    • 22 min
    How Nurses Can Influence Health Policy (HAPF SERIES) with Alison Hernandez

    How Nurses Can Influence Health Policy (HAPF SERIES) with Alison Hernandez

    Health care policy has crucial implications for all of us who rely on our health care system. Behind this pursuit are dedicated nursing professionals who advocate for specific policies they believe will benefit us. In this week's episode, we are joined by Alison Hernandez, PhD, RN and Carla McGarvey.

    • 30 min
    Senior Nutrition (HAPF SERIES) with Marie Gualtieri, PhD

    Senior Nutrition (HAPF SERIES) with Marie Gualtieri, PhD

    COVID-19 has elevated a lot of issues that impact older adults. So, we're going to dig into the details of the impact of aging and food insecurity. In this week's episode, I'm joined by Health and Aging Policy Fellow, Marie Gualtieri, PhD and her Discussant, Liz Albertine, Legislative Director for Representative Rosa L. DeLauro (D-CT-03).

    • 17 min

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