215 episodes

This podcast's purpose is to bring together the field of neuroprosthetics / brain machine interfaces / brain implants in an understandable conversation about the current topics and breakthroughs. We hope to complement scientific papers on new neural research in an easy, digestable way. Innovators and professionals can share thoughts or ideas to facilitate 'idea sex' to make the field of brain implants a smaller and more personal space.

Neural Implant podcast - the people behind Brain-Machine Interface revolutions Ladan Jiracek

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.8 • 16 Ratings

This podcast's purpose is to bring together the field of neuroprosthetics / brain machine interfaces / brain implants in an understandable conversation about the current topics and breakthroughs. We hope to complement scientific papers on new neural research in an easy, digestable way. Innovators and professionals can share thoughts or ideas to facilitate 'idea sex' to make the field of brain implants a smaller and more personal space.

    Craig Mermel on working at Google and Apple and now at Precision Neuroscience

    Craig Mermel on working at Google and Apple and now at Precision Neuroscience

    Craig Mermel is the President and Chief Product Officer at Precision Neuroscience which is a company looking to commercialize Brain-Computer Interfaces using a minimally implantation method and a soft electrode device.
    ***This podcast is sponsored by Iris Biomedical, check out their Neurotech Startup Services here***
    Top 3 Takeaways
    "The combination of both the nature of our thin film and the surgical innovations that we bring enables us to bring cortical surface neurotechnology to patients in a minimally invasive fashion." "Having 10 times the amount of money at an early stage before you actually solve some of the key problems can be a problem because it pushes off some of the hard questions you have to ask yourself." "We're thinking ahead to the future where you have tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands, or millions of interfaces. The amount of damage you do will become a limiting factor at some point." 0:45 Do you want to introduce yourself better than I just did?
    1:30 Why did you leave Apple and Google?
    2:30 What is Precision and why is it special?
    6:00 What's the funding look like?
    8:00 "Why hasn't this been done before?"
    10:00 Are you thinking about licensing out the technology?
    11:15 Iris Biomedical ad sponsorship
    12:00 What's your role now in Precision?"
     12:45 "What are some of your biggest challenges?"
    15:30 You guys raised $12M, why specifically this number?
    19:00 "What are some, best practices or traps to avoid?"
    21:45 Let's do a deeper dive into your work at Google and Apple
     27:30 How would you compare working at Google and Apple vs being in a startup?
    29:15 "Is there anything that we didn't talk about that you wanted to mention?"
     

    • 30 min
    Lothar Krinke on adaptive Deep Brain Stimulation at Newronika

    Lothar Krinke on adaptive Deep Brain Stimulation at Newronika

    Lothar Krinke is the CEO and Board Member of Newronika which is an adaptive Deep Brain Stimulator company looking to improve patient outcomes in things like Parkinson's and Essential Tremor.
    ***This podcast is sponsored by Iris Biomedical, check out their Neurotech Startup Services here***
    Top 3 Takeaways:
    "the one thing we do need to address is really the cost. The cost driver of Deep Brain Stimulation isn't the manufacturing of the system. Now, that's not cheap either it's certainly less than $10,000. How expensive is brain surgery, particularly functional brain surgery? How expensive is it to have all the pre-operation preparation? So I think the field needs to think about how we can lower the cost of Deep Brain Stimulation to make it available to not hundreds of thousands of patients, but literally millions of patients." "I don't think AI or even machine learning has been sufficiently applied in our space. People do it and they talk about it, but if you look at other fields, even EEG, use of AI or machine learning are much more penetrated." "In my mind it is almost unconscionable that only 15% of patients that could benefit from Parkinsons, from DBS do. So somehow we need to have a battle cry. We need to have the responsibility to make this therapy available to more people. And the way to do that is less invasive more automation and lower cost" 0:45 Do you want to introduce yourself better than I just did?
    2:15 "Why is Deep Brain Simulation so exciting for you?"
    3:15 "Can explain what Deep Brain Stimulation is and what it's a treatment for?"
    5:30 "How did you get into the field?"
    6:30 Iris Biomedical ad sponsorship
    7:15 You thought earlier that DBS was too invasive but now changed your mind, why?
    8:15 What are the biggest impediments to DBS?
    12:15 Why is the Newronika DBS better than the alternatives?
    14:30 Why is adaptive DBS better?
    16:30 "What are some of the biggest challenges right now at Newronika?"
    20:30 You are in Minneapolis, West Virginia, and Milan, how are you able to travel so much?
    21:30 "Why aren't you in Gainesville? I was surprised how big the DBS field is here."
    22:15 "For people starting out in the field, do you have any advice?"
    25:30 " What's a big mistake or wrong direction that you see researchers or people on your field going down?"
    27:45 "Could you explain the beta and gamma waves?"
    32:45 "Is there anything that we didn't talk about that you wanted to mention?"

    • 35 min
    Damiano G. Barone on being a neurosurgeon and improving patient quality of life through surgery

    Damiano G. Barone on being a neurosurgeon and improving patient quality of life through surgery

    Damiano Giuseppe Barone is a neurosurgery clinical lecturer at the University of Cambridge and fellow at The Walton Centre in Liverpool, UK. He is interested in tackling basic and translational challenges for the development of the next generation of neural bioelectronics.
    ***This podcast is sponsored by Ripple Neuro, check out their Neuroscience Research Tools here***
    Top 3 Takeaways:
    "My favorite procedure is the procedure that works and you see the patient after that is is a changed patient."  "You come out from medical school like age 23 or 24. Then you get to a general medical program which in the United Kingdom lasts 2 years in and then you get to the residency, which is 8 years. And then 10 years after you are age 34 practicing the neurosurgeon. I personally took what is called an 'out of programme for research/. So basically I halted my neurosurgery residency. I stepped out and I stepped in a PhD program while still covering what is called the on-call rota, which is basically doing emergency work in neurosurgery just to keep my clinical skills going." This added a few more years of training to the list.
    "Quality of life procedures, to be offered to the patients, will have to have a 70 to 80% improvement to justify the risks the patient will have to go through." 0:45 Do you want to introduce yourself better than I just did?
    2:45 You spent 20 years in training for this, did you know this at the outset?
    4:00  "What's it like to get only a few hours of sleep for years?"
    5:00 Why did you choose to go the PhD route as well?
    7:45 What's it like to be digging around in the body?
    9:45 Sponsorship by Ripple Neuro
    10:00 "What's your favorite procedures and what's your least favorite procedures?"
    12:15 "What percentage of patients see improvements?"
    14:30 "What are some, risks other than it not working, what are maybe some damage or maybe even death is that a possibility?"
    16:45 "It's much more dangerous to have, a large device versus a small device. Is that kinda what you've seen?"
    18:45 "Have you been involved in electrode design or device design?"
    19:45 "What are you working on now?"
    25:00 "What are the next steps?"
    28:00 "What would you recommend or what kind of advice do you have for people considering this?"

    • 30 min
    Jon Sakai on interacting with your target patients and the neural sleeve made by Cionic

    Jon Sakai on interacting with your target patients and the neural sleeve made by Cionic

    Jon Sakai is the Head of Commercialization at Cionic, a wearable neurostimulator sleeve for those with neuromuscular disease
    ***This podcast is sponsored by Iris Biomedical, check out their Neurotech Startup Services here***
    Top 3 Takeaways:
    "There isn't any individualized training that needs to happen. What needs to happen is the identification of which muscle groups need support and have those turned on and programmed in intensity appropriately." "We were able to improve door sub selection and inversion in more than 90% of our participants." "There's nothing like getting an appreciation for a problem like the acuity of a problem when you just watch someone for five minutes struggle with something that's probably unimaginable if it's a condition that you're not familiar with." 0:45 "Do you want to introduce yourself better than I just did?"
    2:45 "There are algorithms that go behind it and it can actually predict how you're walking. How does that work?"
    3:45 "Is there a learning process for the algorithms?"
    5:00 "Do you guys use hydrogels as well? And how do you have gels inside of your leggings?"
    5:45 Iris Biomedical ad sponsorship
    6:30 "What kind of improvement is there?"
    8:30 How can your algorithm predict the end of a walking cycle before it has started?
    9:15 What was it like getting FDA approval?
    9:45 What are the next steps for the company after raising your next round of funding?
    10:30 How is this going to be sold? In clinics, prescriptions, or normal retail?
    11:45 What is Head of Commercialization and how does one get that role?
    14:45 "You guys have been around for four years. What do the next four years look like?"
    16:30 "What are some big challenges that are facing?"
    17:30 "If you had unlimited funding, what would you do?"
    18:30 What is some career advice you have?
    22:45 " Is there anything that we didn't talk about that you wanted to mention?"

    • 23 min
    Hannah Claridge on helping small neurotech companies with R&D work at TTP

    Hannah Claridge on helping small neurotech companies with R&D work at TTP

    Hannah Claridge is the Head of Neurotechnology at TTP which is a consultancy that helps neurotech companies create the next generation of medical devices.
    ***This podcast is sponsored by Iris Biomedical, check out their Neurotech Startup Services here***
    Top 3 Takeaways:
    "I think consulting is really fantastic for the variety that it offers you. Not just in terms of seeing problems, but also working with different types of companies, different types of technologies, and having different day-to-day activities as well"
    "There have been cases where we've worked with very small companies where the company is composed of two or three founders whose sole role is the concept of the idea and the thinking behind what's the business case, and then gathering in the funding and passing that funding through for us to carry out the product development work. Now that's pretty unusual in most cases."
    "You need to be able to balance the efficacy of treatment with the side effects that are usually created. And if you go too far in one direction or the other, then that treatment stops being helpful. So if you stimulate too strongly, and the effect might be really effective but if the side effects are too strong, then patients aren't going to tolerate that." 0:45 Do you want to introduce yourself better than I just did?
    1:45 "Let's talk about clinical translation, what does that entail?"
    4:45 Iris Biomedical ad sponsorship
    5:45 "What's a typical contract length and what does it look like from beginning to end?"
    9:00 "It really sounds like you guys do everything. You could just take an idea and then bring it almost all the way to market"
    10:15 "Do you wanna share the neurotech projects you've worked on?"
    11:15 "What's a common problem that you see?"
    17:15 "How does a company recover, like from having so much help to not having any help? Is that typical too?"
    19:45 "What does your day-to-day look like? What are you usually doing?"
    22:30 What's a typical pathway into the career of consulting?
    25:15 "If you had unlimited funding or if a company had unlimited funding, what would you do?"
    28:00 "Is there anything that we didn't talk about that you wanted to mention?"

    • 28 min
    Lindsey Jardine talks all about clinical trials for neurotech

    Lindsey Jardine talks all about clinical trials for neurotech

    Lindsey Jardine is a clinical project manager at Boston Scientific which had acquired Farapulse, a cardiac ablation medical device company she was working in. She runs clinical trials for medtech companies and had done so for neurotech companies as well.
    ***This podcast is sponsored by Iris Biomedical, check out their Neurotech Startup Services here***
    Top 3 Takeaways:
    "One of the most difficult things that I've found while you're actually running the study, is making sure those devices are getting to the sites, which is depending on where your manufacturer is" Hiring a Contract Research Organization (CRO) or hiring clinical trial specialists in-house depends on what the plan for the company is, whether it will be acquired or do an IPO "My biggest problem with startups is wanting to do too much. Because if you're trying to develop eight things at once, you're not gonna get there and you're gonna run outta money. And that's how I see a lot of startups fail" 0:45 Do you want to introduce yourself better than I just did?
    1:15 "What is a clinical trial?"
    2:45 "How do medical devices maybe neurotechnology, compare to pharmaceuticals?"
    4:15 "What's a timeline?"
    6:00 "Where does the time get used up and then where does the money get used up?"
    8:45 Iris Biomedical ad sponsorship
    9:15 "Let's talk about budgets and how they vary, why they vary"
    11:30 "What does your day-to-day look like?"
    17:45 "How did you get into it?"
     21:45 What would be the formal path to get into clinical trials?
    26:15 "What's a common mistake for startups?"
    29:30 "Do the big guys have a speed advantage?"
    31:00 "Is there anything that we didn't talk about that, that you wanted to mention?"

    • 33 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
16 Ratings

16 Ratings

Esaan A ,

Great and Informative Channel!

This channel provides wonderful in-depth perspectives to the developing field of neural technologies. I highly recommend the Dan Rizzuto episode—really made me ponder the possibilities for patients suffering from traumatic brain injury. Awesome job!

Dubuel ,

Best source of neural interface and brain implant info on the web today

Ladan is an amazing podcaster who has managed to snag some of the best and most important people in this space and ask great questions for 30+ minutes at a time. Very on topic, insightful, and I've learned so many things about companies and research that I could not have anywhere else. If you're into brain-computer interfaces, this is perhaps THE most information-dense way to learn.

PotyPotato ,

Helpful and insightful

I really enjoy the different guests in this podcast. I'm a 1st year engineering student and just started as a research student assistant at my university. I still have not gotten to the upper level courses so I feel rather behind in terms of knowledge during lab meetings, but this podcasts helps me shorten that gap between what I know and want to know in terms of neuroprostheses. Definitely recommend!

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