100 episodes

Oriental medicine was not developed in a laboratory. It does not advance through double-blind controlled studies, nor does it respond well to petri dish experimentation. Our medicine did not come from the statistical regression of randomized cohorts, but from the observation and treatment of individuals in their particular environment. It grows out of an embodied sense of understanding how life moves, unfolds, develops and declines.


Medicine comes from continuous, thoughtful practice of what we do in clinic, and how we approach that work. The practice of medicine is more — much more — than simply treating illness. It is more than acquiring skills and techniques. And it is more than memorizing the experiences of others. It takes a certain kind of eye, an inquiring mind and relentlessly inquisitive heart.

Qiological is an opportunity to deepen our practice with conversations that go deep into acupuncture, herbal medicine, cultivation practices, and the practice of having a practice. It’s an opportunity to sit in the company of others with similar interests, but perhaps very different minds. Through these dialogues perhaps we can better understand our craft.

Qiological Podcast Michael Max, L.Ac

    • Alternative Health
    • 4.9, 172 Ratings

Oriental medicine was not developed in a laboratory. It does not advance through double-blind controlled studies, nor does it respond well to petri dish experimentation. Our medicine did not come from the statistical regression of randomized cohorts, but from the observation and treatment of individuals in their particular environment. It grows out of an embodied sense of understanding how life moves, unfolds, develops and declines.


Medicine comes from continuous, thoughtful practice of what we do in clinic, and how we approach that work. The practice of medicine is more — much more — than simply treating illness. It is more than acquiring skills and techniques. And it is more than memorizing the experiences of others. It takes a certain kind of eye, an inquiring mind and relentlessly inquisitive heart.

Qiological is an opportunity to deepen our practice with conversations that go deep into acupuncture, herbal medicine, cultivation practices, and the practice of having a practice. It’s an opportunity to sit in the company of others with similar interests, but perhaps very different minds. Through these dialogues perhaps we can better understand our craft.

    Voices of Our Medical Ancestors • Leo Lok • Qi159

    Voices of Our Medical Ancestors • Leo Lok • Qi159

    We give a great amount of respect to the Classics in Chinese medicine, but understanding these foundational texts of our medicine can be challenge, even if you do understand the old form of Chinese.
    Just as many of struggle to get through the brilliance of Shakespeare, the classics of Chinese medicine require a particular kind of attention. And it doesn't hurt if you actually can understand the "gu wen" classical Chinese language. It's even more helpful if you engaged the other classic literature of China from an early age.
    Our guest in this episode Leo Lok did just that, and in this conversation we see how terse lines from the classics can speak eloquently to confusing cases in the modern clinic.
    Listen in and get a glimpse at how the classics can be applied to difficult clinical cases. You'll be wanting to spend more time with the Su Wen (Simple Questions) after this!
    Head on over to the show notes page for more information about this episode and for links to the resources discussed in the interview.  

    • 45 min
    Listening, Non-doing and Appreciative Attention • Alice Whieldon • Qi158

    Listening, Non-doing and Appreciative Attention • Alice Whieldon • Qi158

    Medicine is a curious business. The “agreement” is that the patient has a problem and we as practitioners are going to fix it. It’s not an unreasonable expectation in our fee for service world. And after all, we are the experts that are supposed to know how to resolve a medical condition.
    But what often gets left out of the conversation is the question of “what is healing?” Along with “who” is responsible for that and “what” is to be done?
    Healing is a curious business. And while patient and practitioner both play a role, more often than not, it’s an inside job.
    In this conversation with Alice Whieldon we explore what is helpful, the invitation that arises from dropping expectation and agenda, and the connective resonance that arises from simply seeing how it is for another.
    Head on over to the show notes page for more information about this episode and for links to the resources discussed in the interview.  

    • 1 hr 7 min
    Practicing Acupuncture in Rural America • Barbara Bittinger • Qi157

    Practicing Acupuncture in Rural America • Barbara Bittinger • Qi157

    Nothing new about city and rural life being very different. But what about when it comes to having an acupuncture practice? What’s it like to practice to practice away from the bustle of big city? Are country folk really that different from city slickers? And what about non-mainstream medicine like acupuncture, how’s it accepted in the hinterlands?
    In this conversation with Barbara Bittinger we discuss the benefits of living and working in rural America and how community is not just an idea but an essential aspect of day to day life.
    Head on over to the show notes page for more information about this episode and for links to the resources discussed in the interview.  

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Magic and Emergence- Treating Teenagers • Rebecca Avern • Qi156

    Magic and Emergence- Treating Teenagers • Rebecca Avern • Qi156

    Can you remember in those first couple of years of puberty when your senses began to quicken and a new world began to open up and you started to question your place in the unfolding this world?
    Adolescence is a glorious and often troublesome ripening and as with so many aspects of our lives these days... it’s medicalized as pathology instead of being seen as a series of dress rehearsals for the challenges the world will ask of us in the future. 
    Acupuncture can be tremendously helpful teens navigating this phase of life and for their parents and families and as well, as medicine does not see kids separate from the family in which they live. 
    Listen in on this conversation with Rebecca Avern on using acupuncture to treat adolescences. 
     
    Head on over to the show notes page for more information about this episode and for links to the resources discussed in the interview.  

    • 1 hr 17 min
    Following Balance and Flow • Jake Fratkin • Qi155

    Following Balance and Flow • Jake Fratkin • Qi155

    It is surprising where life can take us. We follow a hunch or a nudge and somehow gain some momentum that in time generates wind for our sails.
    Not many westerners in the 1970’s started along the road of Chinese medicine. In this long ranging conversation with Jake Fratkin we discuss his perspectives over time and his current thoughts on medicine.
    Listen in for a conversation about herbs, TCM, Japanese acupuncture and the curious road of practice that unfolds when you follow your interests.
    Head on over to the show notes page for more information about this episode and for links to the resources discussed in the interview.  

    • 1 hr 17 min
    Medicine From the Heart- The Practice of Saam Acupuncture • Toby Daly • Qi154

    Medicine From the Heart- The Practice of Saam Acupuncture • Toby Daly • Qi154

    Chinese medicine is not one medicine; it’s a kaleidoscopic plurality. There is no one true acupuncture; we have a rich ecosystem of perspectives and methods. 
    The  trouble with learning something new is that we have let loose of our current understanding usually acquired through effort and hard work. It’s hard to release what we’ve struggled to learn. Our limited understanding of the terrain becomes our turf. It takes a certain amount of confidence in ourselves, and recognition we know we don’t know, to be able to learn something new that may contradict or call into question that which we comfortably feel like we can rely upon.
    Two years ago I started learning Saam acupuncture on a hunch after reading Toby Daly’s article from the Journal of Chinese Medicine. It was at first unpleasantly mind-bending, it took me far afield of what comfortably felt like competence. It invited me into another perspective that eventually came full circle, in that it connected up some of the streams of herbal medicine that I’d been following over the years.
    In this conversation, two years after my first podcast discussion with Toby, I’m able to bring a different set of questions and perspectives now that I’ve got a taste for how the Five Phases and Six Conformations connect in ways I could not previous see. 
    Listen into to this conversation to get a sense of lenses and perspectives of the Buddhist monastic stream of Saam acupuncture. 
     
    Head on over to the show notes page for more information about this episode and for links to the resources discussed in the interview.  

    • 1 hr 12 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
172 Ratings

172 Ratings

AcuSprout ,

Stacey Whitcomb EAMP, Lac.

Qiological is heartfully produced with elegant detail in each beat. Everything about the hour flows exquisitly. The intro monologue is an elegantly woven story which foreshadows the rest of the hour with a tiny morsel to peak your curiosity and propel you into the belly of the beast. Michael is as curious as a four year old, and even though he is a senior practitioner he also queries with the egolessness of a four year old. This podcast is a safe playground for all practitioners to enjoy. I am so grateful for this weekly gift. It's like getting a postcard in the mail from a dear friend. Thank you so much for all you do Michael! Our world is better because you are in it.

Acu Lee ,

Awesome!

I love this podcast! I don't have many colleagues to talk to in my area and this podcast stops the isolation. I’m so grateful for everything I learn from this.

Keith Garofalo ,

I'm hooked

This podcast gets me out of bed in the morning and excited to hear what's next on the menu from Michael Max! His topics and guests are always incredibly interesting and his narrative and instights pre and post show are wholly compelling. Thank you Mr. Max for this inticing dive into all things Chinese Medicine. You restore my excitement for this amazing yet immensely challenging form of medicine. Ok, I'm off now to sign up to be a Qiologician!!

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