100 episodes

Over the last ten years, over 100 rural hospitals have closed their doors. Roughly one in three rural hospitals have been identified as “at risk.” If there was ever a need for strong leadership, that time is now. RHLR’s mission is to provide a forum to have conversations with rural health leaders to discuss and share ideas about what is working, what is not working, lessons learned, success stories, strategies, things to avoid and anything else you want to talk and hear about. RHLR provides a voice for rural health. The only investment is your time, and our goal is to make sure you receive a huge return on your investment. For more information, visit www.rhlradio.com or e-mail bill@billauxier.com.

Rural Health Leadership Radio™ Dr. Bill Auxier

    • Social Sciences

Over the last ten years, over 100 rural hospitals have closed their doors. Roughly one in three rural hospitals have been identified as “at risk.” If there was ever a need for strong leadership, that time is now. RHLR’s mission is to provide a forum to have conversations with rural health leaders to discuss and share ideas about what is working, what is not working, lessons learned, success stories, strategies, things to avoid and anything else you want to talk and hear about. RHLR provides a voice for rural health. The only investment is your time, and our goal is to make sure you receive a huge return on your investment. For more information, visit www.rhlradio.com or e-mail bill@billauxier.com.

    181: A Conversation with Dan Doyle

    181: A Conversation with Dan Doyle

    This week on Rural Health Leadership Radio we’re talking about community-based pulmonary rehabilitation. We’re having the conversation with Dr. Dan Doyle, Senior Physician in Family Medicine at New River Health Association, Physician and Consultant at Cabin Creek Health Center, and Medical Director at New River Breathing Center, a Black Lung Clinic.
    “Q”
    ~Dr. Dan Doyle
    Dr. Doyle grew up in Northern Indiana and attended the University of Notre Dame as a Liberal Arts major. After deciding to go to medical school in 1968, he went to Harvard Medical School, took two years off in the middle to work as a community organizer and health educator in an inner-city neighborhood of Boston, and finished medical school in 1974. In October of 1977, Dr. Doyle came to New River Health and has been there for 39 years!
    “Q”
    ~Dr. Dan Doyle
    Dr. Doyle has also worked as the Medical Director of the Grace Anne Dorney Pulmonary Rehabilitation project of West Virginia since 2013, a collaborative effort of Cabin Creek Health System FQHC, New River Health Association FQHC, Southern West Virginia Health System FQHC, West Caldwell County FQHC in North Carolina, Boone Memorial Hospital, and Jackson General Hospital. Through this collaboration, community-based pulmonary rehabilitation services have been offered and provided.

    • 35 min
    180: A Conversation with Paul Moore

    180: A Conversation with Paul Moore

    This week on Rural Health Leadership Radio we’re talking about COPD prevalence and policy in rural areas. We’re having that conversation with Paul Moore, Senior Health Policy Advisor at the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy.
    "This right here is an opportunity to both bend that healthcare cost curve and while we’re doing that, improve the health and reduce the burden on millions of folks suffering or soon to suffer with COPD."
    ~Paul Moore
    Paul brings a lifetime of experience related to rural healthcare from both his family heritage and more than forty years in community and hospital pharmacy. His experience reaches beyond pharmacy as he has also been the CEO of a County Healthcare Authority, consisting of one of the nation’s earliest Critical Access Hospitals, EMS, a physician clinic and a Home Health Agency.
    "I’m optimistic that in a payment environment where providers are incentivized to provide what will make the most difference, we’ll see more investment, improving prevention and treatments."
    ~Paul Moore
    Paul is also a Past President of the National Rural Health Association and currently serves as the Executive Secretary for the National Advisory Committee for Rural Health and Human Services. He has seen the progression of COPD first-hand and as a pharmacist for over 30 years and hopes to garner national attention for the disease.

    • 26 min
    179: A Conversation with Grace Anne Dorney Koppel

    179: A Conversation with Grace Anne Dorney Koppel

    This week on Rural Health Leadership Radio we’re talking about COPD advocacy and activism. We’re having that conversation with Grace Anne Dorney Koppel, President of the Dorney-Koppel Foundation.
    “Anyone who breathes actually can get COPD because we have this very large number, 25% of people who have never smoked a cigarette.”
    ~Grace Anne Dorney Koppel
    Grace Anne is an educator, a behavioral scientist, and an attorney. She was diagnosed with very severe COPD in 2001 which led her on the path to COPD patient advocacy and activism. Since 2006, she has devoted her training, knowledge and professional life to achieving better outcomes and quality of life for the 30 million Americans and hundreds of million worldwide who have COPD. Grace Anne is a graduate of Fordham University (BA), Stanford University (MA), and Georgetown University School of Law (JD). She has also been awarded a PhD honoris causa from Fordham University, one of her alma maters.
    “What gives me hope is that it’s treatable. We don’t have the cure today, but we do have treatments and one day, I do believe we will have a cure if enough of us speak out loudly.”
    ~Grace Anne Dorney Koppel
    Grace Anne has been President of the Dorney-Koppel Foundation since 1999.One of the missions of the Dorney-Koppel Foundation is to provide start-up funding and strategic guidance for pulmonary rehabilitation centers in areas of high COPD prevalence, primarily in rural America, that have no access to pulmonary rehabilitation. Twelve Grace Anne Dorney Pulmonary Rehabilitation Clinics are now in operation in Kentucky, North Carolina, West Virginia, Louisiana and Maryland. Grace Anne also currently serves on the National Institute of Health’s NHLBI (National Heart, Lung, Blood Institute) Advisory Council.

    • 37 min
    178: A Conversation with Jack Salo

    178: A Conversation with Jack Salo

    This week on Rural Health Leadership Radio we’re talking about technology and transportation in rural health. We’re having that conversation with Jack Salo, Executive Director of the Rural Health Network of South Central New York.
    “There’s a lot that technology can do to help us become more efficient and provide a higher level of transportation service to the rural population.”
    ~Jack Salo
    Jack is a rural advocate and non-profit executive who has worked in South Central New York State for the past 35 years. His experiences range from leading health, human services to youth development organizations. As a rural health advocate, Jack works with a wide range of partners to address the root causes of health issue and health disparities. Centrals to his effort has been providing leadership to develop collaborative, regional projects including Getthere (transportation services), Rural Health Services Corps (AmeriCorps and VISTA services), and The Food & Health Network of South Central New York.
    “I think we have to build on our strong community of practitioners and people who love rural health and rural places.”
    ~Jack Salo
    Jack received his BA degree in Geography and his MS degree in Education from SUNY Oneota. Jack currently serves on the Board of Directors of the NYW Association for Rural Health and Care Compass Network, a regional DSRIP – Medicaid reform agency. He lives with his family on a small, diversified farm near Norwich, New York.

    • 53 min
    177: A Conversation with Jessica Ames and Greg Vallino

    177: A Conversation with Jessica Ames and Greg Vallino

    This week on Rural Health Leadership Radio we’re having a special Christmas episode where we talk about Angel Flight East. We’re having that conversation with Jessica Ames, Outreach and Events Director at Angel Flight East, and Dr. Greg Vallino, an Optometrist at Village Optical and volunteer pilot for Angel Flight East.
    “There’s a light coming in for rural health and I feel like a lot more people are starting to pay attention to it now.”
    ~Jessica Ames
    Jessica attended Millersville University in Pennsylvania where she majored in Public Relations. During her college career she interned with the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society in Harrisburg where she developed her passion for working in nonprofit organizations. After graduating, she knew the field she wanted to work in and found Angel Flight East in 2014 and has been with the organization for five years.
    “My wish is that one day people look up in the sky, and instead of seeing just a general aviation aircraft they would say “there’s another angel flying right by.””
    ~Dr. Greg Villano
    Dr. Greg Villano is an Optometrist in Pennsylvania for a family-oriented private practice, as well as being a volunteer pilot for Angel Flight East. Dr. Villano grew his passion for flight his whole life and pursued his pilot license at 40 years old. He was introduced to Angel Flight East and has enjoyed the amazing feeling of making someone happy through both his volunteer and professional work.

    • 32 min
    176: A Conversation with Alicia Ekstrom

    176: A Conversation with Alicia Ekstrom

    This week on Rural Health Leadership Radio, we’re talking about recruiting in rural areas. We’re having that conversation with Alicia Ekstrom, Recruiting Specialist at The Chautauqua Center.
    “When it comes down to it, that’s what really sells individuals is that – the meaning behind it and the emotion and passion that I do have for the Chautauqua Center.”
    ~Alicia Ekstrom
    Alicia received her Bachelor’s degree in Health Service Management with a minor in Spanish in 2012 and has worked in various healthcare settings including insurance companies, group homes, and local hospitals. She has a passion for fitness and wellness, and teaches a fitness class called POUND. POUND is not only a physical workout, but also provides emotional and mental relief for all ages and capabilities.
    “Leadership is more so someone guiding a group of people and providing that support and direction…”
    ~Alicia Ekstrom
    Alicia was born and raised in Buffalo, New York and recently moved to the rural area known as Chautauqua County. She has always had a passion for helping others, and thrives on the constantly evolving nature of healthcare. Alicia enjoys the challenges and opportunities of recruiting and working in a rural area, and hopes to help fill the gaps present in the rural healthcare setting.

    • 32 min

Customer Reviews

GBMabe ,

Informational for future medical professionals

I am hoping to attend medical school one day and return back to my rural town in NC. This podcast helps me to understand more in-depth about what is happening with healthcare in rural areas like my hometown, informing me of the struggles I will be tackling as a physician. Thank you for producing this for people like me who are passionate about the rural communities in which we grew up in!

shursh333 ,

A no cost means for rural leaders to share what’s working and what’s not!

I stumbled across this podcast as I was desperately trying to find solutions for our isolated small rural community. Dr. Auxier is brilliant at his delivery of a no cost means venue to share what is working and what is not in Rural Healthcare. I listen every week with excitement to hear what is truly available for sustainable solutions my community could utilize. This should be shared to urban and metropolitan communities as well, the gritty, self sustaining, interconnected and interdependent people of rural are the future of our nations healthcare.

thechampionentrepreneur ,

Valuable resource!!!

The resource that Dr. Bill Auxier has put together for Rural America in this podcast is amazing. Because our hospitals in rural America are the cornerstone of our community this resource is in valuable to helping their leadership. If you are in healthcare in any form you need to be listening to rural Health leadership radio. Thank you so much for pulling together all of these amazing individuals and resources for us to learn from. Keep up the great work.

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