100 episodes

Seminary Dropout- It’s not full on academia like in seminary, but that’s not to say that theology nerds won’t like it as well, because it’s not Youth Camp either. There’s no Greek or Hebrew translation home work, but there are also no trust falls. There will be fun, insightful, personal, thoughtful and engaging interviews with Christian leaders, thinkers, bloggers, authors and theologians.

Seminary Dropout Shane Blackshear: Interviews with N.T. Wright, Christena Cleveland, Greg Boyd & More!

    • Religion & Spirituality
    • 4.7 • 362 Ratings

Seminary Dropout- It’s not full on academia like in seminary, but that’s not to say that theology nerds won’t like it as well, because it’s not Youth Camp either. There’s no Greek or Hebrew translation home work, but there are also no trust falls. There will be fun, insightful, personal, thoughtful and engaging interviews with Christian leaders, thinkers, bloggers, authors and theologians.

    Nijay Gupta’s 15 Words of Life from the New Testament

    Nijay Gupta’s 15 Words of Life from the New Testament

    Dr. Nijay Gupta teaches New Testament courses at Northern and working closely with the Master of Arts in New Testament and the Doctor in Ministry in New Testament Context cohorts.







    Dr. Gupta has been teaching and writing for more than a decade, and currently serves as the Editor-in-Chief of the Bulletin for Biblical Research, Co-Editor of The Bible in God’s World series with Scot McKnight, and as a member of the Editorial Board of both Ex Auditu and and of the Biblical Interpretation Series.







    He is a graduate of Miami of Ohio University, Gordon Conwell Theological Seminary, and the University of Durham.















    In 15 New Testament Words of Life, biblical scholar Nijay Gupta explores some of the most important New Testament words; familiar terms in the Christian vocabulary, but there are many who don’t know the original background and theological importance of these words, and how they can be life-giving for Christian faith and life today. To access the deep meaning of these words in the theological vocabulary of the New Testament writers, Gupta discusses each word within a key text and interprets it in three contexts: Canonical—how the New Testament is grounded in the Old, Literary—the meaning developed within the key text, and Historical—the Jewish and Greco-Roman world of the first century.For those first hearers of the gospel who chose to follow Jesus, these words were the words of life, and they can be once again for Jesus-followers in the modern world. With Gupta’s skilled guidance, readers will find their engagement with the New Testament revitalized as they begin to understand how these inspiring ancient words can still be captivating, thought-provoking, and worldview-shaping words for real life today.– From the publisher















    (Formerly In Faith & Doubt) Dr. AJ Swoboda and Dr. Nijay Gupta are co-hosts of Slow Theology: Simple Faith for Chaotic Times. Topics include Scripture, theology, and anything and everything under the sun that gives life meaning. Find the podcast here, or in your favourite podcast app.







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    Get 40% off Shane’s book Go and Do: Nine Axioms on Peacemaking and Transformation From the Life of John Perkins.

    • 44 min
    Bonnie Kristian on the ‘Untrustworthy’ News Media

    Bonnie Kristian on the ‘Untrustworthy’ News Media

    Bonnie is the author of A Flexible Faith: Rethinking What It Means to Follow Jesus Today. As a journalist, she writes opinion pieces on foreign policy, religion, electoral politics, and more. Her column, “The Lesser Kingdom,” appears in print and online at Christianity Today. She is a fellow at Defense Priorities, a foreign policy think tank, and her work has been published at outlets including The New York Times, The Week, USA Today, CNN, Politico, Reason, and The Daily Beast. A graduate of Bethel Seminary, she lives in Pittsburgh with her husband and twin sons.







    Her new book, Untrustworthy: The Knowledge Crisis Breaking Our Brains, Polluting Our Politics, and Corrupting Christian Community is out now.







    You can follow Bonnie on Twitter, and subscribe to her newsletter on Substack.















    Which media outlets will help me be a responsible news consumer? How do I know what is true and whom I can trust? What can I do to combat all the misinformation and how it’s impacting people I love?Many Americans are agonizing over questions such as these, feeling unsure and overwhelmed in today’s chaotic information environment.American life and politics are suffering from a raging knowledge crisis, and the church is no exception. In Untrustworthy, Bonnie Kristian unpacks this crisis and explores ways to combat it in our own lives, families, and church communities.Drawing from her extensive experience in journalism and her training as a theologian, Kristian explores social media, political and digital culture, online paranoia, and the press itself. She explains factors that contribute to our confusion and helps Christians pay attention to how we consume content and think about truth. Finally, she provides specific ways to take action, empowering readers to avoid succumbing to or fueling the knowledge crisis.From the Publisher







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    Get 40% off Shane’s book Go and Do: Nine Axioms on Peacemaking and Transformation From the Life of John Perkins.

    • 46 min
    Richard Hays’ Encouragement to Read with the Grain of Scripture

    Richard Hays’ Encouragement to Read with the Grain of Scripture

    Richard Hays

    Duke Divinity School faculty







    Richard B. Hays is internationally recognized for his work on the Gospels, the letters of Paul, and on New Testament ethics. His scholarly work has bridged the disciplines of biblical criticism and literary studies, exploring the innovative ways in which early Christian writers interpreted Israel’s Scripture. He has also consistently sought to demonstrate how close reading of the New Testament can inform the church’s theological reflection, proclamation, and ministry.







    His book The Moral Vision of the New Testament: Community, Cross, New Creation was selected by Christianity Today as one of the 100 most important religious books of the twentieth century.







    Dr Hays has lectured widely in North America, Europe, Israel, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, and Japan. An ordained United Methodist minister, he has preached in settings ranging from rural Oklahoma churches to London’s Westminster Abbey. Professor Hays has chaired the Pauline Epistles Section of the Society of Biblical Literature, as well as the Seminar on New Testament Ethics in the Society for New Testament Studies, and has served on the editorial boards of several leading scholarly journals.















    “All these essays illustrate, in one way or another, how I have sought to carry out scholarly work as an aspect of discipleship—as a process of faith seeking exegetical clarity.”Richard Hays has been a giant in the field of New Testament studies since the 1989 publication of his Echoes of Scripture in the Letters of Paul. His most significant essays of the past twenty-five years are now collected in this volume, representing the full fruition of major themes from his body of work:– the importance of narrative as the “glue” that holds the Bible together– the figural coherence between the Old and New Testaments– the centrality of the resurrection of Jesus– the hope for New Creation and God’s eschatological transformation of the world– the importance of standing in trusting humility before the text– the significance of reading Scripture within and for the community of faithReaders will find themselves guided toward Hays’s “hermeneutic of trust” rather than the “hermeneutic of suspicion” that has loomed large in recent biblical studies. – From the Publisher







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    Get 40% off Shane’s book Go and Do: Nine Axioms on Peacemaking and Transformation From the Life of John Perkins.

    • 1 hr
    Engaging Ancient Christianity’s Global Identity with Vince Bantu

    Engaging Ancient Christianity’s Global Identity with Vince Bantu

    Dr. Vince Bantu (PhD in Semitic and Egyptian Languages, CUA) is the Ohene (President) of the Meachum School of Haymanot and is Assistant Professor of Church History and Black Church Studies at Fuller Theological Seminary. He is also the Ohene of the Society of Gospel Haymanot (SGH), an academic society of theological Gospelism—Afro-rooted theology committed to the universal Lordship of Jesus, biblical authority and the liberation of the oppressed. Vince, his wife Diana, and their daughters live and minister in St. Louis and they love to travel, watch movies and bust some spades.







    You can follow Vince on Twitter.















    Christianity is not becoming a global religion. It has always been a global religion. The early Christian movement spread from Jerusalem in every direction, taking on local cultural expression all around the ancient world. So why do so many people see Christianity as a primarily Western, white religion?In A Multitude of All Peoples, Vince Bantu surveys the geographic range of the early church’s history, revealing an alternate, more accurate narrative to that of Christianity as a product of the Western world. He begins by investigating the historical roots of the Western cultural captivity of the church, from the conversion of Constantine to the rise of European Christian empires. He then shifts focus to the too-often-forgotten concurrent development of diverse expressions of Christianity across Africa, the Middle East, and Asia.In the process, Bantu removes obstacles to contemporary missiological efforts. Focusing on the necessity for contextualization and indigenous leadership in effective Christian mission, he draws out practical lessons for intercultural communication of the gospel. Healing the wounds of racism, imperialism, and colonialism will be possible only with renewed attention to the marginalized voices of the historic global church. The full story of early Christianity makes clear that, as the apostle Peter said, “God does not show favoritism, but accepts those from every people who fear him and do what is right.” – From the Publisher







    Subscribe/Rate/Review Seminary Dropout on Apple Podcasts







    Get 40% off Shane’s book Go and Do: Nine Axioms on Peacemaking and Transformation From the Life of John Perkins.

    • 48 min
    Aaron Niequist on Why Pastors, Priests, and Guides Deserve a Retreat

    Aaron Niequist on Why Pastors, Priests, and Guides Deserve a Retreat

    Aaron Niequist is a liturgist, writer, in New York City. After leading worship at Mars Hill Church (Grand Rapids, MI) and Willow Creek Church (Barrington, IL), Aaron created A New Liturgy- a collection of modern liturgical worship recordings. Shortly after, Aaron started a discipleship-focused, formational, ecumenical, practice-based community at Willow Creek called The Practice. Since writing ‘The Eternal Current: How a Practice-Based Faith Can Save Us from Drowning’, he’s continued to create resources to help us all flesh it out.







    You can find Aaron’s book, music, and other resources on his website, and you can follow him on Twitter, @aaronieq.



















    This retreat is for exhausted spiritual leaders who are looking for holy space, godly spiritual guidance, and new personal practices.







    Many of us spiritual leaders spend so much time helping others participate, that we miss out on the fullness of the invitation. In an attempt to help our communities live “unforced rhythms of grace”, we accidentally stumble into “forced rhythms of stress”. But it doesn’t have to be this way. It’s been said that “The way we do anything is the way we do everything”, and Jesus Christ humbly invites us to baptize our entire lives—even the work of ministry—into God’s deep streams of Life.







    Learn more about the Pastors, Priests, and Guides Retreat here.















    Subscribe/Rate/Review Seminary Dropout on Apple Podcasts







    Get 40% off Shane’s book Go and Do: Nine Axioms on Peacemaking and Transformation From the Life of John Perkins.

    • 37 min
    Kellye Fabian on Holy Vulnerability

    Kellye Fabian on Holy Vulnerability

    Kellye Fabian serves at Willow Creek Community Church as the Pastor of Biblical Oversight & Support and is the author of Holy Vulnerability: Spiritual Practices for the Broken, Ashamed, Anxious, and Afraid and Sacred Questions: A Transformative Journey Through the Bible. A former trial attorney turned pastor, Kellye’s experiences have equipped her to work closely with people struggling and learning how to cope with hard things.







    Kellye provides leadership, develops content, and fills various roles at Willow Creek, including teaching and leading the community through spiritual practices. Kellye also teaches spiritual discipline workshops.







    Kellye has a Certificate of Spiritual Formation through the Transforming Center and a master of arts degree in New Testament from Northern Seminary. Kellye and her husband, Steve, have three daughters between them and live in the Chicago area.







    You can read more of Kellye’s thoughts on her blog, and follow her on Twitter.















    Life can seemingly be fine on the surface. But for any of us who scratch that surface, we recognize anxiety, shame, disappointment, and regret. And yet, in the depths of these feelings, in the things we hate about ourselves, others, and this world, we can invite God’s presence.This is the essence of holy vulnerability. To enter into holy vulnerability is to intentionally expose our raw wounds so that God can heal and mend and transform us.What happens when we refuse this depth of healing? Something that author Kellye Fabian calls “unholy leakage”—that thing that happens when we are afraid, ashamed, or anxious, and instead of facing the reality of what we’re experiencing, we just spill it on everyone around us. Where is anxiety occupying our hearts and minds? Where is fear hindering our relationships and limiting our faith and joy? Where is shame causing us to question our self-worth? Is there another way? Yes.Holy Vulnerability unpacks six atypical, unexpected spiritual practices intended to open us to God’s healing and transformation. Through practices like laughter, community, and tangible engagement with creation, Kellye guides us to notice where brokenness is breaking into our lives. And as we intentionally seek God in the midst of these practices—as we step out in holy vulnerability—God will meet us there. – From the Publisher







    Subscribe/Rate/Review Seminary Dropout on Apple Podcasts







    Get 40% off Shane’s book Go and Do: Nine Axioms on Peacemaking and Transformation From the Life of John Perkins.

    • 41 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
362 Ratings

362 Ratings

Splatarooney ,

Well done!

Seminary dropout truely came into a niche. A need to fill a gap and did so very well. Being both thought provoking and relatable, Shane does a wonderful job working through his personal convictions about the gap between the layity (did i spell that right?) and the seminary graduates. By finding the best and brightest, seeking from innovators as well as those who disagree with the "traditional church" mentality, the podcast induces deep thought and actioned response that helps me to grow my ministry.

GlassTaps ,

Listening for 4 years, still going

I discovered Shane’s podcast during a critical period in my spiritual life. Much has changed since then, but his gentle, reflective style and gift for establishing rapport with both guest and listener remains as strong as ever. So many of these interviews have broadened my perspective and helped me form a vocabulary for past church experiences along with the church I envision and long for. Most of all, it’s helped me hold on to hope that there’s room for faith, doubt, and community in my journey toward a healthier spiritual life. To Shane, his guests, and the family and friends that support them, thank you for doing what you’re doing, I wish you all the best.

sherry tucker ,

Other Protestant churches have included women as leaders for decades

I don’t understand why these churches who are new to including women in leadership don’t look at other faith traditions and learn from them. The Methodists, Episcopalians, Presbyterians, for example, have included women as leaders for a few decades now. “Best practices,” have been established. Honor their work, acknowledge what has been done, and use it a template. I didn’t hear this discussed at all in this podcast. Wondering why this is?

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