407 episodes

Join Professor Fred Watson, a world-renowned Astronomer at Large, and Sci-Fi Author and Broadcaster Andrew Dunkley, on their captivating podcast, Space Nuts. Dive into the vast universe of space, astronomy and astrophysics as they discuss the latest news, exciting space travel adventures, groundbreaking discoveries, and unravel the enduring mysteries of the cosmos. This engaging series offers a unique blend of expert insights and imaginative storytelling and listener input, making it a must-listen for space enthusiasts and science fiction fans alike.

Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/space-nuts--2631155/support.

Space Nuts Space Nuts

    • Science
    • 4.8 • 188 Ratings

Listen on Apple Podcasts
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Join Professor Fred Watson, a world-renowned Astronomer at Large, and Sci-Fi Author and Broadcaster Andrew Dunkley, on their captivating podcast, Space Nuts. Dive into the vast universe of space, astronomy and astrophysics as they discuss the latest news, exciting space travel adventures, groundbreaking discoveries, and unravel the enduring mysteries of the cosmos. This engaging series offers a unique blend of expert insights and imaginative storytelling and listener input, making it a must-listen for space enthusiasts and science fiction fans alike.

Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/space-nuts--2631155/support.

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

    #396: Cosmic Riddles & Martian Quakes: Unpacking the Universe's Expansion & Insight's Seismic Secrets

    #396: Cosmic Riddles & Martian Quakes: Unpacking the Universe's Expansion & Insight's Seismic Secrets

    Prepare to dive into the cosmic unknown with this captivating episode of Space Nuts, where your hosts Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson tackle the enigmatic questions that baffle even the most seasoned space enthusiasts.
    First up, Nate challenges us with a classic conundrum: If the universe is expanding, what is it expanding into? Fred sheds light on this perplexing query with a blend of cosmological insights and geometrical possibilities, leaving us to ponder the very fabric of reality and the potential of unseen dimensions.
    Next, Lee from Sweden seeks to understand the inner workings of Mars through the eyes of the InSight mission. How can a single point of reference on the Red Planet reveal so much about its interior and the impact of distant meteorites? The answer lies in the ingenious science of seismic waves, which our hosts promise to explore further—homework for the curious minds!
    Finally, Wayne, a longtime supporter, wonders about the gravitational waves generated by supernovae and whether LIGO can detect them. Fred navigates through the explosive symmetries of supernovae and the peculiarities of neutron star mountains, offering a glimpse into the cosmic ripples that traverse our universe.
    Packed with humor, profound insights, and the occasional canine interruption, this episode of Space Nuts is not just a journey through space but a testament to the boundless curiosity that drives us all. So, sit back, subscribe, and let Andrew and Fred guide you through the stars. And don't forget, your questions are the fuel for our cosmic explorations—keep them coming!
    For more interstellar adventures and the answers to your most intriguing space questions, subscribe to Space Nuts on your favorite podcast platform. Until our next galactic gathering, keep reaching for the stars!
    📋 Episode Chapters
    (00:00) This is Space Nuts. Coming up, we're talking about the expansion of space
    (00:39) If space is expanding, what is it expanding into
    (07:35) Lee Stevenson has sent us a question about Mars exploration
    (08:21) Lee: How do you detect seismic signals on Mars from thousands of kilometres away
    (12:36) What kind of gravitational wave is generated by a supernova
    (19:17) Professor Fred Watson, astronomer at large, getting over his tick bite



    Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/space-nuts--2631155/support.

    • 20 min
    #395: Origins Reversed: Black Holes Lead the Dance of Galaxies & SpaceX's Defense Dreams

    #395: Origins Reversed: Black Holes Lead the Dance of Galaxies & SpaceX's Defense Dreams

    Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/space-nuts--2631155/support.

    Prepare to thrust into a celestial debate that flips conventional wisdom on its head! In this thought-provoking episode of Space Nuts, join Andrew Dunkley and the ever-astute Professor Fred Watson as they unravel a cosmic chicken-or-egg scenario: Did supermassive black holes or galaxies come first? With the James Webb Space Telescope peering back in time, new findings suggest a revolutionary twist in our understanding of the early universe. Could black holes have been the catalysts for star formation, predating the galaxies they inhabit?
    But the intrigue doesn't end at the edge of the cosmos. Closer to home, SpaceX's Starship is making waves, not just with its plans for Mars colonization, but also with its potential military applications. Discover how this behemoth of a rocket could redefine rapid global transport, delivering cargo—or perhaps one day troops—across the planet in a mere hour. With suborbital flights on the horizon, we're on the cusp of a new era in logistics and space travel.
    As always, Andrew and Fred expertly guide us through these cosmic conundrums with insights that challenge our perceptions and expand our understanding of the universe. So, space enthusiasts, buckle up for another episode that promises to take you on a journey beyond the stars.
    For the latest updates in space discovery and answers to the universe's most perplexing questions, subscribe to Space Nuts on your preferred podcast platform. Join us as we continue to explore the wonders of space and science. Until our next celestial sojourn, keep your gaze skyward and your curiosity boundless!
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    📋 Episode Chapters
    (00:00) Andrew Dunkley hosts Space nuts, the astronomy and space science podcast
    (01:16) Fred says he thought it was a tick bite, but it wasn't
    (03:14) New research suggests black holes came first in the early universe
    (13:30) Andrew Dunkley: I was going to ask how you feel about this theory
    (14:35) Space company SpaceX is working on something that has the military intrigued
    (22:52) Spaceplane system could be used to take passengers from London to Sydney
    (24:49) Fred Watson: China is heading in same direction as the US in space

    • 28 min
    #395-396 Premium: Cosmic Conundrums: Black Holes Leading the Cosmic Dance or Galaxies?

    #395-396 Premium: Cosmic Conundrums: Black Holes Leading the Cosmic Dance or Galaxies?

    Prepare to be captivated by cosmic revelations and interstellar inquiries on this episode of Space Nuts! Join your host Andrew Dunkley and the illustrious Professor Fred Watson as they unravel the mysteries of the cosmos, starting with a paradigm-shifting puzzle: which came first, the black hole or the galaxy? The James Webb Space Telescope has provided data that could flip our understanding of cosmic evolution on its head, suggesting that supermassive black holes may have been the harbingers of star formation in the early universe.

    The conversation then rockets to SpaceX's latest endeavors with their behemoth Starship, a craft that's not just eyeing the stars but also piquing the interest of the military for rapid terrestrial deployment. What could this mean for the future of global logistics and space travel? And as geopolitical rivalries extend to the heavens, with China advancing its space capabilities, the stakes are higher than ever.

    Finally, the Space Nuts tackle your cosmic curiosities, diving into the enigmatic expansion of space, the seismic secrets revealed by the Insight mission on Mars, and the gravitational waves unleashed by supernovae. Are these cosmic ripples detectable by LIGO? Let's find out.

    With a blend of humor, expertise, and the occasional dad joke, this episode is a must-listen for anyone eager to probe the depths of space and time. So, join us on this astronomical journey, and remember to send in your own questions for a chance to be featured in future cosmic discussions.

    For more out-of-this-world content, subscribe to Space Nuts on your preferred podcast platform, and follow us on YouTube for even more galactic goodness. Until next time, keep your telescopes trained and your curiosity insatiable!
    📋 Episode Chapters

    (00:00) Astronomer Fred Watson joins us on Space nuts to discuss SpaceX rockets
    (01:23) Fred says he thought he had spotty fever from a tick bite
    (03:21) James Webb space telescope is looking into the early universe
    (13:38) Andrew Dunkley: I was going to ask how you feel about this theory
    (14:40) Spacex working with NASA on spaceship to send astronauts back to moon
    (17:17) News item suggests US military wants to use starship for cargo transfer
    (24:54) Andrew Dunkley: China is moving in the same direction as the US
    (27:29) If space is expanding, what is it expanding into
    (34:28) Lee Stevenson has sent us a question about Mars exploration
    (35:14) Lee: How do you know when a meteorite is hitting Mars
    (39:30) What kind of gravitational wave is generated by a supernova
    (45:26) If you have questions for us, send them through via our website
    (46:23) Professor Fred Watson, astronomer at large, getting over his tick bites

    #393-394 Premium: A Moon's Secret Ocean & The Bacterial Dilemma: Mars and Beyond

    #393-394 Premium: A Moon's Secret Ocean & The Bacterial Dilemma: Mars and Beyond

    Prepare for a cosmic conundrum, Space Nuts enthusiasts! Episode 392 is set to launch you into a realm where science fiction collides with science fact. Join Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson as they discuss a moon that's been dubbed the 'Death Star' due to its eerie resemblance to the iconic Star Wars space station. But the real twist? This celestial body is making waves for reasons far beyond its sci-fi lookalike status—it's shaking up scientific theories in a way that's nothing short of explosive.

    We're also venturing into the red sands of Mars, examining the potential for bacteria to withstand the harsh Martian conditions. This revelation isn't just a scientific curiosity; it has profound implications for future human missions to the Red Planet. Could these microscopic stowaways pose a threat to astronauts, or might they hold the key to unlocking the secrets of life beyond Earth?

    And for those of you who love to ponder the mysteries of the universe, we've got a treat. We're diving into the gravitational ballet of Lagrange points, exploring the enigmatic pull of supermassive black holes, and delving into the dark matter that binds galaxies together. Plus, we tackle a tantalizing 'what if' scenario: If we could ask a highly advanced alien civilization just one question, what would it be? The answers might surprise you.

    So buckle up for a journey through space that's as thought-provoking as it is thrilling. Whether you're a seasoned astronaut or an armchair astronomer, this episode of Space Nuts is your ticket to the stars. And remember, we're always eager to hear from you—your cosmic queries and interstellar insights are what make this podcast out of this world!

    To keep up with the latest episodes and join the Space Nuts journey, subscribe to our podcast on your favorite platform and visit spacenutspodcast.com for more space-tastic content. Until next time, keep your telescopes trained and your curiosity ignited. This is Space Nuts, signing off.

    📋 Episode Chapters

    (00:00) Andrew Dunkley is under the weather on this edition of Space Nuts
    (03:23) It might be an opportunist bacteria that follows the bite that causes ulcers
    (04:57) Fred says moon Mimus does strange thing when facing Earth
    (12:35) Enceladus and Mimas are totally different in their surface structure
    (19:06) Scientists have found four bacteria capable of surviving exposure to Mars environment
    (25:19) Bacteria carrying to Mars could pose a health risk to astronauts, study finds
    (28:50) Fred asks five questions about gravity between the earth and the sun
    (34:16) How is the gravitational effect of supermassive black holes and dark matter determined
    (37:30) Robert from the Netherlands proposes a what if question for us
    (43:33) Robert says we can only have one question since there's two of us
    (46:23) Fred: Keep yourself occupied and you feel a lot better

    #394: Gravitational Ballet: Unveiling the Secrets of Lagrange Points and Black Hole Mysteries

    #394: Gravitational Ballet: Unveiling the Secrets of Lagrange Points and Black Hole Mysteries

    Join us for an intergalactic conundrum that will stretch your mind to the far reaches of the universe! In this enlightening episode of Space Nuts, your hosts Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson are navigating the cosmic highways and byways, tackling some of the most perplexing questions out there.
    First stop: the mysterious Lagrange points. Listener Jim from Texas is puzzled about how gravity is balanced at these points, especially L2 and L3. Fred serves up a celestial explanation that involves not just gravity but centrifugal force, too. It's a cosmic balancing act that keeps our space missions on course and our minds in awe.
    Next, we're zooming into the heart of galaxies where supermassive black holes reign supreme. Kerry's burning question leads us to differentiate the gravitational effects of these cosmic giants from the elusive dark matter. How do astronomers measure their impact separately, and could we have misjudged their mass? Fred illuminates the dark corners of this astronomical puzzle.
    And for the grand finale, we're pondering the ultimate 'what if': communication with a superior alien race. If we could ask them just one question, what would it be? From the practical to the profound, Andrew and Fred muse over what could be humanity's most significant query.
    Whether you're a cosmic rookie or a seasoned stargazer, this episode is guaranteed to provide a gravity-defying leap into the unknown. So, strap in and prepare for a journey that's as educational as it is entertaining. And remember, keep those questions coming – they just might be the next big topic on Space Nuts!
    For all this and more, subscribe to Space Nuts on your favorite podcast platform, and join us on this stellar adventure. Until next time, keep your eyes to the skies and your hearts full of wonder.

    Become a supporter of this podcast and access commercial-free episodes: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/space-nuts--2631155/support.

    • 19 min
    #393: The Death Star Doppelgänger: Diving into Mimas's Mysteries and Martian Microbes

    #393: The Death Star Doppelgänger: Diving into Mimas's Mysteries and Martian Microbes

    Prepare for a cosmic exploration that takes us from the realm of science fiction to the frontiers of science reality! In this thrilling episode of Space Nuts, join Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson as they delve into the mysteries of our very own solar system Death Star. No, it's not about to obliterate a planet; it's Mimas, Saturn's moon, capturing the scientific spotlight with a revelation that's causing quite the stir. Discover why this celestial body, bearing a striking resemblance to the infamous Star Wars construct, is now making waves with a potential sub-surface ocean hiding beneath its cratered façade.
    But that's not all that's brewing in the interstellar pot. We're also venturing to the red plains of Mars, confronting the possibility that bacteria might not just survive but thrive under the harsh Martian conditions. What does this mean for future human missions to the Red Planet? Could these microscopic stowaways pose a threat to astronauts, or might they hold the key to unlocking the secrets of life beyond Earth?
    With a blend of intrigue and expertise, Andrew and Fred navigate through these cosmic questions, offering insights that will leave you pondering long after the episode ends. So buckle up, space enthusiasts, as we embark on another adventure that's sure to expand your universe.
    For those hungry for more interstellar knowledge, be sure to subscribe to Space Nuts on your favorite podcast platform and join our growing community of astronomy aficionados. With new episodes filled with astronomical wonders and answers to your burning space queries, Space Nuts is your gateway to the cosmos. Until next time, keep gazing upward and let your curiosity lead the way!
    Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/space-nuts--2631155/support.
    Show notes created by https://headliner.app
    ---
    📋 Episode Chapters
    (00:00) This is space nuts. Coming up, we're looking at the Death Star
    (03:05) It might be opportunist bacteria that follows the bite that could cause Alzheimer's
    (04:39) Fred says moon Mimus actually librates around planet Earth
    (12:16) Andrew Ker: Mimas and Enceladus are totally different moons
    (18:56) NASA to try flutter test on its ingenuity helicopter on Mars
    (19:52) Scientists have tested four human infectious bacteria to survive harsh Martian environments
    (26:37) Fred Watson says bacteria could pose a risk to astronauts on Mars


    Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/space-nuts--2631155/support.

    • 32 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
188 Ratings

188 Ratings

conaninspace ,

Legal Earthling

This wondrous podcast reminds me of the news on my Grezianik-fouty back home. I miss home but, to my surprise, applying for a “green card” was simply a matter of admitting I arrived from Enceladus to which my caseworker said “No problem there!” The odd thing is, my card indicates that I’m a native of Spain. Hola!

isksmkdifj ,

Why is THAT the name

Don’t name a podcast that is for kids space 🥜 but besides that it is a pretty good podcast

Devil pony 123456 ,

Love it

Keep up the great work this is so funny and freaky but in a great way!

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