1,069 episodes

19 years on Australian Public Radio (as StarStuff), 8 years of podcasting and counting. We have a lot of content to share with you.
Recognized worldwide by our listeners and industry experts as one of the best and most thoroughly researched programs on Astronomy, Space, and Science News.
Hosted by Stuart Gary, a veteran radio science reporter, broadcaster and now podcaster.
Keep up-to-date and learn something new with every episode.
New episodes weekly. Three new episodes are published on Mondays for our subscribers and individual episodes publicly on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
Show your support for SpaceTime, help us reach our goals with early access to commercial-free episodes and bonuses via Supercast, Patreon, Apple Podcasts and YouTube.
Links at https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com/about
Enjoy!

Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/spacetime-with-stuart-gary--2458531/support.

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary SpaceTime

    • Science
    • 4.3 • 261 Ratings

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

19 years on Australian Public Radio (as StarStuff), 8 years of podcasting and counting. We have a lot of content to share with you.
Recognized worldwide by our listeners and industry experts as one of the best and most thoroughly researched programs on Astronomy, Space, and Science News.
Hosted by Stuart Gary, a veteran radio science reporter, broadcaster and now podcaster.
Keep up-to-date and learn something new with every episode.
New episodes weekly. Three new episodes are published on Mondays for our subscribers and individual episodes publicly on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
Show your support for SpaceTime, help us reach our goals with early access to commercial-free episodes and bonuses via Supercast, Patreon, Apple Podcasts and YouTube.
Links at https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com/about
Enjoy!

Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/spacetime-with-stuart-gary--2458531/support.

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

    S27E71: Winding Back Hubble, Starliner's Historic Crew Launch, and OSIRIS Apex's Solar Feat

    S27E71: Winding Back Hubble, Starliner's Historic Crew Launch, and OSIRIS Apex's Solar Feat

    Join us for SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 71, where we delve into the latest cosmic events and technological advancements reshaping our understanding of the universe.
    First, we discuss NASA's announcement that the Hubble Space Telescope will begin winding back its science programme due to ongoing issues with its gyroscopes. This decision marks a significant transition for the historic observatory, which has revolutionised astronomical discovery since its launch in 1990.
    Next, we cover the long-awaited launch of Boeing's Starliner, which has finally taken a crew to the International Space Station. This milestone paves the way for Starliner to join SpaceX's Dragon in transporting crews to the orbiting outpost under NASA's commercial crew programme.
    Finally, we highlight NASA's OSIRIS Apex spacecraft's survival after a close encounter with the sun. This mission is essential for its upcoming rendezvous with the asteroid Apophis in 2029.

    Follow our cosmic conversations on X @stuartgary, Instagram, YouTube, and Facebook. Join us as we unravel the mysteries of the universe, one episode at a time.
    Sponsor Offer
    This episode is proudly supported by NordPass. Secure your digital journey across the cosmos with a password manager you can trust. Find your stellar security solution at https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass.
    Listen to SpaceTime on your favourite podcast app including Apple Podcasts, Spotify, YouTube Music, or wherever you get your podcasts.
    Support SpaceTime
    Become a supporter of SpaceTime:
    If you'd like to support SpaceTime and access early release episodes, commercial-free...then look for us on Patreon or Supercast. Links on our website at spacetimewithstuart.com
    https://www.bitesz.com/show/spacetime/support/
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    • 31 min
    S27E72: Two Tiny Moons

    S27E72: Two Tiny Moons

    SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 72
    *Moon orbiting asteroid Dinkinesh ends up being two tiny moons stuck together
    Astronomers have discovered that a tiny moonlet orbiting the main belt asteroid Dinkinesh is actually two little moons that have melded together.
    *Could there be an underground ocean on Saturn's moon Mimas?
    Scientists are speculating that Saturn's tiny moon Mimas could have developed an underground ocean as its orbital eccentricity decreased to its present value and caused its icy shell to melt and thin.
    *NASA launches its second PREFIRE satellite aboard Rocket Lab’s Electron
    NASA has launched the second of a pair of earth observation satellites designed to study how much heat the Arctic and Antarctica radiate into space and how this influences global climates.
    *The Science Report
    Confirmation that circumcised men who have sex with other men are at lower risk of HIV infection.
    Warnings that mature eucalyptus trees don’t increase their growth with increased carbon dioxide.
    The new study that shows how frequently dope can trigger psychotic symptoms.
    Skeptics guide to shadow figures

    https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com https://www.bitesz.com/show/spacetime/

    S27E70: SpaceX's Mega Rocket Soars and China's Historic Lunar Mission

    S27E70: SpaceX's Mega Rocket Soars and China's Historic Lunar Mission

    Join us for SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 70, where we delve into the latest cosmic events and groundbreaking discoveries shaping our understanding of the universe.
    First, we explore SpaceX's Starship, the world's largest and most powerful rocket, which has successfully completed its fourth test flight. This historic mission is a significant step towards developing a colonial transport ship capable of carrying 100 people or 150 tonnes of supplies to the moon, Mars, and beyond. We dive into the details of the launch, the hot staging manoeuvre, and the successful splashdown.
    Next, we discuss China's latest lunar lander, which has successfully touched down on the far side of the moon. This mission aims to collect samples from the lunar South Pole's Aitken basin, providing valuable insights into the moon's formation and evolution.
    Finally, we highlight the arrival of three new Australian-built satellites in Japan, destined for launch to the International Space Station. These satellites are part of Curtin University's Binar space programme and represent a significant milestone in Western Australia's space journey.

    Follow our cosmic conversations on X @stuartgary, Instagram, YouTube, and Facebook. Join us as we unravel the mysteries of the universe, one episode at a time.
    Sponsor Offer
    This episode is proudly supported by NordPass. Secure your digital journey across the cosmos with a password manager you can trust. Find your stellar security solution at https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass.
    Listen to SpaceTime on your favourite podcast app including Apple Podcasts, Spotify, YouTube Music, or wherever you get your podcasts.
    Support SpaceTime
    Become a supporter of SpaceTime: https://www.bitesz.com/show/spacetime/support/

    • 45 min
    S27E70-72 Premium: S27E70-72 Premium: SpaceX's Starship Soars and China's Lunar Lander Triumphs

    S27E70-72 Premium: S27E70-72 Premium: SpaceX's Starship Soars and China's Lunar Lander Triumphs

    The Space, Astronomy and Science Podcast.
    SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 70
    *A successful test flight for Starship
    The world’s largest and most powerful rocket sPACEx’S Starship has successfully completed its fourth test flight.
    *China probe lands successfully on the far side of Moon
    China's Chang'e-6 lunar lander has successfully touched down on the far side of the Moon for an historic sample return mission.
    *Three new Australian built satellites arrive in Japan for launch to the ISS
    Teams from Curtin University’s Binar Space Program have just delivered three cubesat spacecraft to the Japanese launch provider Space BD for eventual transport to the International Space Station.
    *The Science Report
    There’s now a 60% chance of a La Niña weather pattern developing between July and September.
    There’s now an 80% likelihood of exceeding 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels between now and 2028.
    The new mRNA-based melanoma vaccine which reduces the risk of cancer reoccurrence by 49%.
    Skeptics guide to the Catholic Church’s view on the paranormal

    SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 71
    *The Hubble Space Telescope to wind back operations.
    It’s been described as the most valuable scientific instrument ever made – but NASA has been forced to announce that the Hubble Space Telescope will begin winding back its science program.
    *Starliner finally launches
    After years of delays and technical issues Boeing's Starliner has finally launched taking its first manned flight to the International Space Station.
    *NASA's OSIRIS-APEX unscathed after a searing pass by the Sun
    Mission managers say NASA's OSIRIS-APEX spacecraft has survived its closest ever encounter with the Sun.
    *The Science Report
    A new study finds a link between eczema and the amount of salt in your diet.
    The importance of friends to reduce your risk of heart disease in older age.
    The study showing how irrational, inconsistent, and prone to making mistakes AI chatbots are.
    Alex on Tech: e-safety commissioner back down

    SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 72
    *Moon orbiting asteroid Dinkinesh ends up being two tiny moons stuck together
    Astronomers have discovered that a tiny moonlet orbiting the main belt asteroid Dinkinesh is actually two little moons that have melded together.
    *Could there be an underground ocean on Saturn's moon Mimas?
    Scientists are speculating that Saturn's tiny moon Mimas could have developed an underground ocean as its orbital eccentricity decreased to its present value and caused its icy shell to melt and thin.
    *NASA launches its second PREFIRE satellite aboard Rocket Lab’s Electron
    NASA has launched the second of a pair of earth observation satellites designed to study how much heat the Arctic and Antarctica radiate into space and how this influences global climates.
    *The Science Report
    Confirmation that circumcised men who have sex with other men are at lower risk of HIV infection.
    Warnings that mature eucalyptus trees don’t increase their growth with increased carbon dioxide.
    The new study that shows how frequently dope can trigger psychotic symptoms.
    Skeptics guide to shadow figures

    https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com https://www.bitesz.com/show/spacetime/

    This week’s guests include:
    Curtin University Senior Engineer Dr Fergus Downey
    PreFire Principal Investigator Tristan L’Ecuyer from the University of Wisconsin
    PreFire Instrument lead Engineer Sharmila Padmanabhan from NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
    PreFire Research Assistant Natasha Vos from the University of Wisconsin

    And our regular guests:
    Alex Zaharov-Reutt from techadvice.life
    Tim Mendham from Australian Skeptics

    🌏 Get Our Exclusive NordPass deal here ➼ https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass . The discount is incredible! And it’s risk-free with Nord’s 30-day money-back guarantee! ✌

    Listen to SpaceTime on your favorite podcast app with our universal listen link: https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com/listen and access show links via https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ

    S27E69: Webb's Record-Breaking Galaxy Discovery and the Hunt for New Worlds

    S27E69: Webb's Record-Breaking Galaxy Discovery and the Hunt for New Worlds

    Join us for SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 69, where we uncover the latest cosmic revelations and scientific advancements.
    First, we delve into a groundbreaking discovery by the Webb Space Telescope, which has identified the most distant galaxy ever observed. Located a staggering 290 million years after the Big Bang, this galaxy offers unprecedented insights into the universe's infancy and the formation of its earliest stars and galaxies. We explore the methods and implications of this discovery, including the galaxy's surprising brightness and the presence of dust and ionized gas.
    Next, we discuss the announcement of a massive new collection of exoplanet discoveries. NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) has confirmed 120 new exoplanets and identified six new candidates, bringing the total number of known exoplanets to over 6000. These findings offer a rich database for studying planetary properties and environments, particularly those that may harbor life.
    Finally, we highlight new X-ray observations from NASA's Chandra X-ray Telescope, revealing dramatic changes in two famous supernova remnants: the Crab Nebula and Cassiopeia A. These observations provide stunning visualizations and valuable data on the dynamic processes occurring in these remnants.
    Follow our cosmic conversations on X @stuartgary, Instagram, YouTube, and Facebook. Join us as we unravel the mysteries of the universe, one episode at a time.
    Sponsor Offer
    This episode is proudly supported by NordPass. Secure your digital journey across the cosmos with a password manager you can trust. Find your stellar security solution at https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass.
    Listen to SpaceTime on your favorite podcast app including Apple Podcasts, Spotify, YouTube Music, or wherever you get your podcasts.
    Support SpaceTime
    Become a supporter of SpaceTime: https://www.bitesz.com/show/spacetime/support/
    www.bitesz.com

    • 24 min
    S27E68: Unveiling Venus: New Volcanic Activity Discovered

    S27E68: Unveiling Venus: New Volcanic Activity Discovered

    Join us for SpaceTime Series 27 Episode 68, where we explore the latest cosmic discoveries and technological advancements shaping our understanding of the universe.
    First, we uncover new evidence suggesting that Venus is volcanically active. By analysing data from NASA's Magellan radar, scientists have identified two volcanoes on Venus that erupted in the early 1990s. This discovery adds to the growing body of evidence that Venus may be far more volcanically active than previously thought.
    Next, we discuss the discovery of a new kind of volcanic eruption on Earth. Researchers have identified a unique eruption mechanism at Hawaii's Kilauea volcano, describing it as a "stomp rocket" eruption driven by sudden pressure increases as the ground collapses.
    Finally, we look forward to the maiden flight of the European Space Agency's new Ariane 6 rocket, now slated for next month. This launch marks a significant milestone in Europe's space exploration capabilities.
    00:00 This is spacetime series 27, episode 68 for broadcast on 5 June 2024
    00:45 Two volcanoes on Venus appear to have erupted in the early 1990s
    05:40 Venus is often considered to be earths sister planet with runaway greenhouse effect
    09:47 Scientists say Kilauea volcano erupted like a stomp rocket in 2018
    14:05 The maiden flight of the European Space Agency's new Ariane six rocket now likely
    19:19 The upper and main stages of the Ariane six flight model have arrived
    22:03 New study says vaccines for bird flu are best defence if virus spreads between humans
    24:03 Study finds popular teens sleep 27 minutes less per night than their peers
    25:57 There are growing concerns about inaccurate information coming out of artificial intelligence programmes
    26:41 Google's AI overviews are giving very strange information based on Reddit posts
    27:45 Sam Altman has rushed to form a new AI safety team
    31:03 Spacetime is available every Monday, Wednesday and Friday 

    Follow our cosmic conversations on X @stuartgary, Instagram, YouTube, and Facebook. Join us as we unravel the mysteries of the universe, one episode at a time.
    Sponsor Offer
    This episode is proudly supported by NordPass. Secure your digital journey across the cosmos with a password manager you can trust. Find your stellar security solution at https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass.
    Listen to SpaceTime on your favourite podcast app including Apple Podcasts, Spotify, YouTube Music, or wherever you get your podcasts.
    Support SpaceTime
    Become a supporter of SpaceTime:
    If you'd like to support SpaceTime and access early release episodes, commercial-free...then look for us on Patreon or Supercast. Links on our website at spacetimewithstuart.com 
    https://www.bitesz.com/show/spacetime/support/
    www.bitesz.com

    • 33 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
261 Ratings

261 Ratings

macdon763 ,

Informative with extra loud commercials

Like: Great information presented well.

Do not like: Frequent and jarring, painfully loud commercials. Would prefer longer, more infrequent commercial breaks with content offered at normal volumes.

diggzaroni ,

Good science, awful politics

These fools started talking about AI and "wokeism" and what's going on on college campuses hollering about "misinformation." Real F'ing rich when these clowns probabl can't even define woke.... Talk about misinformation. Absolute joke! Never listening again'

CT Oceanographer ,

Right wing drivel overwhelms any science

The science reporting is okay but the host and the guests insert right wing political stupidity into the episodes.

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