58 episodes

The Audio PANCE and PANRE is an audio Board and Rotation Review Series that includes ten Multiple Choice PANCE and PANRE Board Review Questions in Each Episode. Now you can study for your PANCE, PANRE, and End or Rotation Exams in the gym, in the car, on a run, or while relaxing on the beach. This free series is limited to every other episode. To download the complete series join Smarty PANCE at https://smartypance.com/sign-up/

The Audio PANCE and PANRE Physician Assistant Board Review Podcast The Physician Assistant Life | Smarty PANCE

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.6 • 151 Ratings

The Audio PANCE and PANRE is an audio Board and Rotation Review Series that includes ten Multiple Choice PANCE and PANRE Board Review Questions in Each Episode. Now you can study for your PANCE, PANRE, and End or Rotation Exams in the gym, in the car, on a run, or while relaxing on the beach. This free series is limited to every other episode. To download the complete series join Smarty PANCE at https://smartypance.com/sign-up/

    Podcast Episode 98: Ten PANCE, PANRE, and Rotation Review Questions

    Podcast Episode 98: Ten PANCE, PANRE, and Rotation Review Questions

    Welcome to episode 98 of the Audio PANCE and PANRE Physician Assistant/Associate Board Review Podcast.







    Join me as I cover ten PANCE, PANRE, and EOR™ review questions from the Smarty PANCE Instagram/Facebook page and the smartypance.com board review website.







    Special from today’s episode:







    * Join the Smarty PANCE Member’s Community* Check out our all-new End of Curriculum™ (EOC) Exam Course (still in development)* Follow Smarty PANCE and The Daily PANCE Blueprint on Instagram* Follow Smarty PANCE and The Daily PANCE Blueprint on Facebook







    Below you will find an interactive exam to complement today’s podcast.







    The Audio PANCE/PANRE and EOR PA Board Review Podcast







    I hope you enjoy this free audio component to the examination portion of this site. The full board review course includes over 2,000 interactive board review questions and is available to all members of Smarty PANCE.







    * You can download and listen to past FREE episodes here, on iTunes, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, and most podcasting apps.* You can listen to the latest episode, take an interactive quiz, and download more resources below.







    Listen Carefully Then Take the Practice Exam











    If you can’t see the audio player, click here to listen to the full episode.







    Podcast Episode 98: Ten PANCE/PANRE and EOR Topic Blueprint Questions







    1. An 81-year-old female presents to the ER with acute onset of low back pain. She complains of bowel dysfunction and loss of sensation over her inner thighs. Physical exam reveals decreased lower extremity reflexes. Which of the following is the best diagnostic test for the likely diagnosis?







    A. Lumbar radiographsB. MRI of the lumbosacral spineC. CSF fluid analysisD. Scoliosis studiesE. None of the above











    2. Which of the following is the most common cause of Cushing syndrome?







    A. IatrogenicB. Bronchogenic carcinomaC. Pituitary adenomaD. Adrenal adenomaE. Obesity











    3. A 73-year-old female presents with facial flushing, wheezing, and watery diarrhea for a few months. Her symptoms are worsened by certain foods. Which of the following is the best initial diagnostic study to order for the suspected diagnosis?







    A. 5-HIAA in urineB. Serum ACE levelsC. Chest radiographD. Upper endoscopyE. Bronchoscopy

    • 17 min
    Podcast Episode 97: Murmurs Made Incredibly Easy – Ten PANCE Murmur Questions

    Podcast Episode 97: Murmurs Made Incredibly Easy – Ten PANCE Murmur Questions

    Welcome to episode 97 of the Audio PANCE and PANRE PA board review podcast.







    Today is a bonus episode rounding out this fabulous five-part podcast series with Joe Gilboy PA-C, all about cardiac murmurs. In this week’s episode, we continue our discussion of cardiac murmurs with ten PANCE and PANRE murmur questions.







    We’ll cover the ins and outs of all the NCCPA content blueprint valvular disorders and learn how to identify and differentiate them from one another.







    If you haven’t already, make sure to listen to our previous podcast episodes where we covered tricuspid stenosis, aortic valve murmurs, mitral valve murmurs, pulmonic valve murmurs, and HOCM and MVP.







    Podcast Episode 97: Murmurs Made Incredibly Easy – 10 PANCE and PANRE Murmur Questions







    Below is a transcription of this podcast episode edited for clarity.







    * You can download and listen to past FREE episodes here, on iTunes, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Amazon Music, and most podcasting apps.* You can listen to this latest episode and access even more resources below.







    [00:00:00] Welcome back, everybody. This is Joe Gilboy. I work with Stephen Pasquini over there at Smarty PANCE. And today is the most dreaded podcast of all because you know what I’m going to do. That’s right. I’m going to ask cardiac murmur questions.







    And I know it’s the most dreaded thing in the world. Let’s do this together because what I want to try to do here is make sense of it all. So, let’s just kind of recap some basic rules before we start going down this thing. You know, the previous lectures, what have I been barking about? What’s Joe been saying? First – inspiration, right? Expiration left.







    [00:00:40] Inspiration, right? Expiration left. So, with inspiration, the right-sided murmurs sound louder. So that’s the tricuspid and the pulmonic valve regardless of if it’s stenosis or regurgitation.

    • 29 min
    Podcast Episode 96: Murmurs Made Incredibly Easy (Part 5 of 5) – MVP and HOCM

    Podcast Episode 96: Murmurs Made Incredibly Easy (Part 5 of 5) – MVP and HOCM

    Welcome to episode 96 of the Audio PANCE and PANRE PA board review podcast.







    Today is part five of this fabulous five-part series with Joe Gilboy PA-C, all about cardiac murmurs. In this week’s episode of the Audio PANCE and PANRE podcast, we continue our discussion of cardiac murmurs with a focus on Mitral Valve Prolapse (MPV) and Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy (HOCM).







    We’ll cover the ins and outs of these two NCCPA content blueprint murmurs and learn how to identify and differentiate them from other types of murmurs.







    If you haven’t already, make sure to listen to our previous podcast episodes where we covered tricuspid stenosis, aortic valve murmurs, mitral valve murmurs, and pulmonic valve murmurs.







    HOCM and MVP (a brief introduction)















    Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is a cardiac abnormality that leads to the muscle in the wall of the heart growing and thickening to the point that it blocks blood flow exiting the heart.







    The condition can be mild or severe, and it can lead to a variety of symptoms, including shortness of breath, chest pain, and irregular heartbeat. Complications may include heart failure, an irregular heartbeat, and sudden cardiac death.







    HOCM is a hereditary condition, and it is usually diagnosed in adulthood. There is no cure for HOCM, but treatments are available to manage the symptoms and help reduce the risk of complications. With proper care, people with HOCM can live long and healthy lives.







    *Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is covered under the PANCE cardiology content blueprint -> cardiomyopathy -> hypertrophic cardiomyopathy







    HOCM is also covered as part of the PAEA EOR pediatric rotation -> cardiovascular topic list -> hypertrophic cardiomyopathy















    Mitral Valve Prolapse (MPV) is a condition in which the leaflets of the mitral valve bulge or prolapse back into the left atrium during systole. This may cause blood to flow backward into the left atrium, leading to a heart murmur.







    In some cases, MPV may also cause symptoms such as fatigue, dizziness, chest pain, and shortness of breath.







    While MPV is usually benign, it can occasionally lead to serious complications such as heart failure or stroke.







    Treatment for MPV typically involves lifestyle modification and...

    • 21 min
    Podcast Episode 95: Ten PANCE, PANRE, and Rotation Review Questions

    Podcast Episode 95: Ten PANCE, PANRE, and Rotation Review Questions

    Welcome to episode 95 of the Audio PANCE and PANRE Physician Assistant/Associate Board Review Podcast.







    Join me as I cover ten PANCE, PANRE and EOR review questions from the Smarty PANCE Instagram/Facebook page and the smartypance.com board review website.







    Special from today’s episode:







    * Follow Smarty PANCE and The Daily PANCE Blueprint on Instagram* Follow Smarty PANCE and The Daily PANCE Blueprint on Facebook







    Below you will find an interactive exam to complement today’s podcast.







    The Audio PANCE/PANRE and EOR PA Board Review Podcast







    I hope you enjoy this free audio component to the examination portion of this site. The full board review course includes over 2,000 interactive board review questions and is available to all members of Smarty PANCE.







    * You can download and listen to past FREE episodes here, on iTunes, Spotify, on Google Podcasts, Stitcher, and most podcasting apps.* You can listen to the latest episode, take an interactive quiz, and download more resources below.







    Listen Carefully Then Take the Practice Exam











    If you can’t see the audio player, click here to listen to the full episode.







    Podcast Episode 95: Ten PANCE/PANRE and EOR Topic Blueprint Questions







    1. A 52-year-old patient is admitted with a lower gastrointestinal bleed. He is given 2 units of packed red blood cells. A few hours later the patient develops a fever but has no other symptoms or changes in vital signs. Lab studies reveal no significant changes. Which of the following is the most likely diagnosis?







    A. Transfusion-associated circulatory overloadB. Acute immune-mediated hemolytic reactionC. Transfusion-related acute lung injuryD. Febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reactionE. None of the above











    2. Which of the following is not a side effect of lithium?







    A. HyperparathyroidismB. HypothyroidismC. Cognitive fogD. TremorsE. All are side effects











    3. Which of the following best explains the pathophysiology of vasovagal syncope?







    A. Increase in parasympathetic signals and withdrawal of sympathetic signalsB. Severe narrowing of the aortic valveC. Drop in blood pressure upon standing due to inadequate peripheral vasoconstrictionD. Occlusion of the pulmonary artery leading to right ventricle dysfunctionE. Blood accumulation in the brain leading to compression of adjacent brain structures











    4.

    • 22 min
    Podcast Episode 94: Murmurs Made Incredibly Easy (Part 4 of 5) – Tricuspid Stenosis

    Podcast Episode 94: Murmurs Made Incredibly Easy (Part 4 of 5) – Tricuspid Stenosis

    Welcome to episode 94 of the Audio PANCE and PANRE PA board review podcast.







    Today is part four of this fabulous five-part series with Joe Gilboy PA-C, all about cardiac murmurs. In this week’s episode of the Audio PANCE and PANRE podcast, we continue our discussion of cardiac murmurs with a focus on the tricuspid valve.







    We’ll cover the ins and outs of tricuspid valve stenosis and learn how to identify it and differentiate it from other types of murmurs.







    If you haven’t already, make sure to listen to our previous podcast episode where we covered aortic valve murmurs and mitral valve murmurs, and pulmonic valve murmurs.







    The Tricuspid Valve















    The tricuspid valve, or right atrioventricular valve, is a one-way valve that sits between the right atrium and right ventricle of the heart. It is essential for right ventricular filling and for preventing the backflow of blood from the right ventricle into the right atrium when the right ventricle contracts during systole.







    When functioning properly, the tricuspid valve is a passive structure that opens and closes in response to the pressure of the blood flowing through the heart.







    The right atrium receives deoxygenated blood from the superior and inferior vena cava. The tricuspid valve which separates the right atrium from the right ventricle opens during ventricular diastole, allowing the deoxygenated blood to flow from the right atrium into the right ventricle, and closes during ventricular systole preventing the backflow of blood from the right ventricle into the right atrium as the right ventricle contracts to pump blood into the lungs out through the pulmonary artery.







    Tricuspid Valve Stenosis







    Tricuspid stenosis is a narrowing of the tricuspid valve or one of its three leaflets.







    If the tricuspid valve is narrowed or stenotic, it will not open properly during diastole, increasing the volume of blood in the right atrium. When the right ventricle contracts the stiffened tricuspid valve also fails to close completely and tricuspid regurgitation develops.







    Nearly all cases are caused by rheumatic fever.







    Podcast Episode 94: Murmurs Made Incredibly Easy (Part 4 of 5) – Tricuspid Valve Stenosis











    Below is a transcription of this podcast episode edited for clarity.







    * You can download and listen to past FREE episodes here, on iTunes, Spotify, Go...

    • 18 min
    Podcast Episode 93: Murmurs Made Incredibly Easy (Part 3 of 5) – Pulmonary Valve Stenosis and Regurgitation

    Podcast Episode 93: Murmurs Made Incredibly Easy (Part 3 of 5) – Pulmonary Valve Stenosis and Regurgitation

    Welcome to episode 93 of the Audio PANCE and PANRE physician assistant/associate board review podcast.







    Today is part three of this extraordinary five-part series with Joe Gilboy PA-C, all about cardiac murmurs. In this week’s episode of the Audio PANCE and PANRE podcast, we continue our discussion of cardiac murmurs with a focus on the pulmonic valve.







    We’ll talk about the different types of murmurs (stenosis and regurgitation) that can occur with the pulmonic valve and how to differentiate them from other types of murmurs. If you haven’t already, make sure to listen to our previous podcast episode where we covered the aortic valve murmurs and mitral valve murmurs.







    The Pulmonic Valve







    Pulmonic valve stenosis (PVS) and pulmonic valve regurgitation (PVR) are two common heart valve diseases. PVS is a narrowing of the pulmonic valve, while PVR is leakage of blood back through the pulmonic valve. Both conditions can lead to significant heart problems if left untreated.







    Pulmonic valve stenosis







    PVS is the most common congenital heart disease, affecting approximately 1 in 1000 people. It can lead to right heart failure and/or pulmonary hypertension (high blood pressure in the lung arteries). PVS is caused by an abnormally thickened pulmonic valve or localized stenosis which means that it has a narrowing of the valve. Pulmonic valve stenosis has several different causes including:







    * Congenital heart disease – this means that the abnormal valve was present from birth but is often undiagnosed until adulthood. For example, children with Down’s syndrome or Noonan syndrome are more likely to have an undiagnosed congenital heart defect such as PVS. It commonly is a component of tetralogy of Fallot.* Cocaine use in pregnancy – research has shown that there is a link between the use of cocaine in pregnant women and children with PVS, particularly if it is used close to the time of conception or later stages of pregnancy.* Infection during pregnancy can cause an inflammatory response which may lead to heart problems for the baby.* Autoimmune disease – PVS is sometimes associated with other autoimmune diseases, such as lupus.







    Symptoms of PVS can vary depending on the type of stenosis that is present and how much it has advanced. Mild cases may not cause any symptoms at all; however, it is common for patients to experience breathlessness, fatigue, chest pain, and palpitations.







    Heart sounds include increased splitting of S2 and a harsh crescendo-decrescendo ejection murmur heard best at the left parasternal 2nd or 4th intercostal space when the patient leans forward; the murmur grows louder immediately with Valsalva release and with inspiration.







    People with PVS may need to take some medication to ease their symptoms. For example, diuretics can help remove excess fluid; beta-blockers reduce the workload on the heart and therefore lower blood pressure and heart rate, and long-acting calcium channel blockers can reduce the force of contraction of the heart’s left ventricle.

    • 30 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
151 Ratings

151 Ratings

Cera Bellum ,

Great podcast, super helpful

Great refresher tool as I studied for the IPANE that I JUST PASSED!!! I wish I had this when I took the PANCE originally almost a decade ago but was glad to have this when sitting the Irish Physician Associate National Exam in January. I’ve always had an auditory learner and having questions to drill in the car and on my walks was fantastic. I am now a PA-C and PA-IC!! Thanks!

adrie7721 ,

Amazing! And free!

This podcast is amazing for quick review questions and explanations no matter what point of your career you are at! So excited and glad I ran into the last episodes with Joe explaining heart murmurs. You MUST listen at least once!

Mmw928 ,

So helpful!

Love this podcast, it’s so helpful for a quick review!

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