209 episodes

This podcast provides insight on the academic library market through conversations with representatives of some of the biggest and most innovative companies influencing it, as well as, with authors of insightful books, librarians who are transforming their field, and academics whose research is laying the groundwork for the future.

The Authority File Choice

    • Education
    • 4.8 • 6 Ratings

This podcast provides insight on the academic library market through conversations with representatives of some of the biggest and most innovative companies influencing it, as well as, with authors of insightful books, librarians who are transforming their field, and academics whose research is laying the groundwork for the future.

    Emerging Space Markets: Unpacking Space Commercialization

    Emerging Space Markets: Unpacking Space Commercialization

    On July 20th, 2021, Blue Origin—the aerospace company founded by multi-billionaire Jeff Bezos—launched a space flight with four passengers, including the founder himself. This 10-minute flight to the borders of outer space sparked new discussions surrounding commercial investments in the space economy. How has space exploration evolved from a government-sanctioned space race to an industry rife with privately-funded business ventures?



    Dr. Stella Tkatchova, a project manager in the European Space Industry, joins us for this four-part series to characterize today’s space market. Who are the major players? Which sectors of the space economy prove to be the most sustainable—and lucrative? Is space tourism a viable, profitable opportunity for billionaires, or just a publicity stunt?



    In this first episode, Stella introduces us to the commercialization of the space industry. She digs into the rapid progression of private investments in the field, as well as her predictions for advancements in space debris cleanup, solar-powered satellites, and lunar exploration. Stella also chats about her two books on the subject, 2018’s Emerging Space Markets, and a forthcoming title, which will dig into the impact of disruptions in the market due to new space technologies.









    Missed an episode? Subscribe to our monthly newsletter, Choice Podcast Updates and check out the Authority File Round-Up on our blog, Open Stacks!

    • 17 min
    Understanding and Implementing Cybersecurity: Balancing Academic Freedom with Information Protection

    Understanding and Implementing Cybersecurity: Balancing Academic Freedom with Information Protection

    Emailing a former professor about research breakthroughs. Downloading copyrighted papers off the internet. Sharing login credentials. Aren’t these all harmless characteristics of academia? Everyday tricks of the scholarly trade? Alan Brill, Senior Managing Director in the Cyber Risk practice at Kroll, warns that seemingly harmless actions or good intentions may lead to serious consequences—can the push toward academic freedom end up endangering our information in the process?



    In this final episode, Alan discusses hackers’ exploitation of free-flowing information. He tackles the issue of Sci-Hub—the controversial website that shares pirated research—and the importance of respecting patents, copyright protection, and trade secrets. Alan also reveals his perspective on emerging threats in cybersecurity, and why cyber risk preparation at a university is so essential in today’s information age. “There is no such thing as 100 percent protection … What we need is a pre-planned incident response program … so that when it happens—and I think the only rational position today is don’t think in terms of if, think in terms of when it happens—you’re going to know what to do.”



    Missed an episode? Subscribe to our monthly newsletter, Choice Podcast Updates and check out the Authority File Round-Up on our blog, Open Stacks!

    • 19 min
    Prison Life Writing: How the History of Incarceration Affects the Narrative

    Prison Life Writing: How the History of Incarceration Affects the Narrative

    Simon Rolston, in his new book Prison Life Writing: Conversion and the Literary Roots of the U.S. Prison System, separated the history of American prisons into two categories: the “rehabilitative” Treatment Era of the mid-1940s to mid-1970s, and the contemporary state of mass incarceration. Though the conversion narrative has remained constant throughout these two periods, prison life writers’ critiques of capitalism, colonialism, and white supremacy have shifted. What subtle and not-so-subtle changes have taken place? How have past and current calls for prison reform and abolition affected prison life writing?



    In this final episode, Simon touches on the differences between traditions of prison life writers from the 1960s and 70s compared to those of today. He highlights the stories of Jimmy Santiago Baca, Shaka Senghor, and the intriguing paradox of Susan Burton’s conversion narrative, which mirrors the transformative journey of an Alcoholics Anonymous member.



    Simon also underscores the need for the support of those outside the prison system—from protesting the prison industrial complex to helping the incarcerated rebuild their lives and connections. Finally, he shares his hopes for the future of prison life writing; namely, that it will no longer exist. “I’d love to be able to say in 20 or 30 years we’re no longer going to have a tradition of prison life writing. We’ll have a tradition of people who are treated fairly within a criminal justice system.”

    Missed an episode? Subscribe to our monthly newsletter, Choice Podcast Updates and check out the Authority File Round-Up on our blog, Open Stacks!

    • 26 min
    Understanding and Implementing Cybersecurity: How to Prepare for and Combat Cyberattacks

    Understanding and Implementing Cybersecurity: How to Prepare for and Combat Cyberattacks

    “They try to put guilt on you. They try to make you think it’s your professional responsibility to help them. But the key is: security procedures only work if we use them consistently, and if we’re trained to know that bad actors are going to play on those emotions.” Alan Brill, Senior Managing Director in the Cyber Risk practice at Kroll, understands the ploys hackers use during a cyberattack—and the training needed to combat them. What kind of preparation yields the best security against the growing risk of organized, sophisticated cyberthreats? What’s the librarian’s role in contributing to this cyber-safe campaign?



    In this third episode, Alan listens to a clip from a recent Choice webinar on cyberattacks, reviewing what went right and lessons learned. Alan also walks through the various tricks hackers can pull—dropping in personnel names, making requests appear incredibly urgent—to persuade staff to abandon protocol and grant access. Last, he shares guidance on what both librarians and administrators can do to enforce unified, collective cybersecurity across campus.



    Missed an episode? Subscribe to our monthly newsletter, Choice Podcast Updates and check out the Authority File Round-Up on our blog, Open Stacks!

    • 19 min
    Prison Life Writing: The Limits of the Conversion Narrative

    Prison Life Writing: The Limits of the Conversion Narrative

    “As an incarcerated or formerly incarcerated person, you don’t have a lot of room to move. You don’t have a lot of choice in terms of narratives that are available to you.” Simon Rolston, author of Prison Life Writing: Conversion and the Literary Roots of the U.S. Prison System, found a pattern in prison life writing. Of the many books he read by incarcerated authors, the vast majority followed a conversion narrative—you enter prison a certain type of person, and emerge as another. But what about the stories that don’t follow that pattern? What can they tell us about the narratives we choose to publish—and those we leave behind?



    In this third episode, Simon discusses the limits of the conversion narrative, and how its complexities reflect on the genre and system of incarceration. He digs into James Carr’s autobiography Bad, which utilizes both African American folk storytelling traditions and prison storytelling customs to tell his violent, hyper-sexualized, and controversial story. Simon also explains how the history of the US prison system’s treatment of incarcerated women—a focus on the return to the “domestic sphere” and curbing supposed promiscuity—continues to influence female prison life writing.

    Missed an episode? Subscribe to our monthly newsletter, Choice Podcast Updates and check out the Authority File Round-Up on our blog, Open Stacks!

    • 23 min
    Understanding and Implementing Cybersecurity: Why Are Universities under (Cyber) Attack?

    Understanding and Implementing Cybersecurity: Why Are Universities under (Cyber) Attack?

    In recent years, universities have become target-rich environments for cyberattacks. But why? What do hackers want from academic institutions? According to Alan Brill, Senior Managing Director in the Cyber Risk practice at Kroll, information. Because of universities’ breadth of non-public data and extensive interconnectivity across campus and state networks, institutions have become a hot bed of cybercrime. “Once you understand the scope of the risk, you have to start asking the question: Are we matching our preventive and detective tools to that risk? And if we’re not, why not, and what are we going to do about it?”



    In this second episode, Alan digs into why proactive measures—rather than reactionary—can help mitigate cyber risk. He explains the threats in and outside of an institution, what a “zero-day attack” is, and why zero-day risks require such immediate alarm and action. Plus, Alan shares his advice on how librarians can prepare for and fend off these attacks—don’t delay updating your software!



    Missed an episode? Subscribe to our monthly newsletter, Choice Podcast Updates and check out the Authority File Round-Up on our blog, Open Stacks!















    In recent years, universities have become target-rich environments for cyberattacks. But why? What do hackers want from academic institutions? According to Alan Brill, Senior Managing Director in the Cyber Risk practice at Kroll, information. Because of universities’ breadth of non-public data and extensive interconnectivity across campus and state networks, institutions have become a hot bed of cybercrime. “Once you understand the scope of the risk, you have to start asking the question: Are we matching our preventive and detective tools to that risk? And if we’re not, why not, and what are we going to do about it?”



    In this second episode, Alan digs into why proactive measures—rather than reactionary—can help mitigate cyber risk. He explains the threats in and outside of an institution, what a “zero-day attack” is, and why zero-day risks require such immediate alarm and action. Plus, Alan shares his advice on how librarians can prepare for and fend off these attacks—don’t delay updating your software!



    Missed an episode? Subscribe to our monthly newsletter, Choice Podcast Updates and check out the Authority File Round-Up on our blog, Open Stacks!

    • 24 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
6 Ratings

6 Ratings

Top Podcasts In Education

Listeners Also Subscribed To