1,602 episodes

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro and Sabrina Tavernise. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

The Daily The New York Times

    • News
    • 4.4 • 86.9K Ratings

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro and Sabrina Tavernise. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

    The Summer of Airline Chaos

    The Summer of Airline Chaos

    Across the United States, airline travel this summer has been roiled by canceled flights, overbooked planes, disappointment and desperation.
    Two and a half years after the pandemic began and with restrictions easing, why is flying still such an unpleasant experience?

    • 23 min
    The Taliban Takeover, One Year Later

    The Taliban Takeover, One Year Later

    One year ago this week, when the Taliban retook control of Afghanistan, they promised to institute a modern form of Islamic government that honored women’s rights.

    That promise evaporated with a sudden decision to prohibit girls from going to high school, prompting questions about which part of the Taliban is really running the country.

    Guest: Matthieu Aikins, a writer based in Afghanistan for The New York Times and the author of “The Naked Don’t Fear the Water: An Underground Journey with Afghan Refugees.”

    • 22 min
    The Tax Loophole That Won’t Die

    The Tax Loophole That Won’t Die

    Carried interest is a loophole in the United States tax code that has stood out for its egregious unfairness and stunning longevity.

    Typically, the richest of the rich pay 40 percent tax on their income. The very narrow, select group that benefits from carried interest pays only 20 percent.

    Earlier versions of the Inflation Reduction Act targeted carried interest. But the loophole has survived. Senator Kyrsten Sinema, Democrat of Arizona, demanded her party get rid of efforts to eliminate it in exchange for her support.

    How has the carried interest loophole lasted so long despite its obvious unfairness?

    Guest: Andrew Ross Sorkin, a columnist for The New York Times and the founder and editor-at-large of DealBook.

    • 26 min
    The Sunday Read: ‘How One Restaurateur Transformed America’s Energy Industry’

    The Sunday Read: ‘How One Restaurateur Transformed America’s Energy Industry’

    It was a long-shot bet on liquid natural gas, but it paid off handsomely — and turned the United States into a leading fossil-fuel exporter.

    The journalist Jake Bittle delves into the storied career of Charif Souki, the Lebanese American entrepreneur whose aptitude for risk changed the course of the American energy business.

    The article outlines how Mr. Souki rose from being a Los Angeles restaurant owner to becoming the co-founder and chief executive of Cheniere Energy, an oil and gas company that specialized in liquefied natural gas, and provides an insight into his thought process: “As Souki sees it,” Mr. Bittle writes, “the need to provide the world with energy in the short term outweighs the long-term demand of acting on carbon emissions.”

    In a time of acute climate anxiety, Mr. Souki’s rationale could strike some as outdated, even brazen. The world may be facing energy and climate crises, Mr. Souki told The New York Times, “but one is going to happen this month, and the other one is going to happen in 40 years.”

    “If you tell somebody, ‘You are going to run out of electricity this month,’ and then you talk to the same person about what’s going to happen in 40 years,” he said, “they will tell you, ‘What do I care about 40 years from now?’”

    • 30 min
    Boy Scouts or Girl Scouts?

    Boy Scouts or Girl Scouts?

    Five years ago, after decades of resistance, the Boy Scouts of America made a momentous change, allowing girls to participate. Since then, tens of thousands have joined.

    Today we revisit a story, first aired in 2017, about 10-year-old twins deciding which group to join, and find out what’s happened to them since.

    • 28 min
    Pregnant at 16

    Pregnant at 16

    This episode contains strong language and descriptions of an abortion.

    With the end of Roe v. Wade, Louisiana has become one of the most difficult places in the United States to get an abortion. The barriers are expected to disproportionately affect Black women, the largest group to get abortions in the state.

    Today, we speak to Tara Wicker and Lakeesha Harris, two women in Louisiana whose lives led them to very different positions in the fight over abortion access.

    • 53 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
86.9K Ratings

86.9K Ratings

😉💙🙃 ,

12 Friday 2022 Girl and Boy Scouts

She was merely in the wrong girl scout troop Period! She needed to change troup/group. My Girl Scout troop earned badges, learned fire making skills, wood whittling/carving, pocket knives, camping crafts and techniques, there wasn’t much difference between the two excepting the sexes. Camping, Leadership skills, life saving/swimming skills. Many cities only have one group the boy/Girl Scouts. So, sad seeing they felt so different in their individual groups A lot of musical group singing and summer group camping two week a year. A lot of community fund raisers. I loved Girl Scout and spent 6 years participating Trump was looked into at Mar A Lago for sharing nuclear secrets. 😮

writemor ,

Boy Scouts or Girl Scouts

Beautiful and compelling story illustrating issues facing trans youngsters in a way that increases awareness, understanding and acceptance.

Vasiliuki ,

Biased

There is some talent at this outfit, including Varvaro (or is it Barbaro?), but the subs are absolute disasters. No mo’ Astead VW. Herndon. PLEASE! That guy is a disgrace.

In spite of some good reporting, it can’t be taken seriously. Their bias borders outright racism, and in their minds “diverse” is just a euphemism for “anti-white.” Just read the following excerpt from their Sunday, July 31st show:

“Interviewing more than 50 current and former book professionals, as well as authors, Ms. Valdes learned about the previous unsuccessful attempts to cultivate Black audiences, and considered the intricacies of an industry culture that still struggles to “overcome the clubby, white elitism it was born in.””

Never knew the common noun “black” has to be capitalized, while “white” shouldn’t. I’d rather flush money down the toilet than subscribe and fund their propaganda.

Top Podcasts In News

NPR
Alex Wagner, MSNBC
The Daily Wire
Cumulus Podcast Network | Dan Bongino
Crooked Media
The Daily Wire

You Might Also Like

NPR
New York Times Opinion
This American Life
Vox
NPR
The Washington Post

More by The New York Times

New York Times Opinion
The New York Times
New York Times Opinion
WBUR
The New York Times
New York Times Opinion