28 episodes

The Other 80 podcast — brought to you by Claudia Williams at UC Berkeley School of Public Health — hosts real, honest dialogue about the things that help keep people healthy beyond traditional medical care, like housing, social connections and food, and the cutting edge policies, research and programs supporting whole person health. Join former White House advisor, entrepreneur and host Claudia Williams for deep conversations with the innovators, implementers, researchers and policymakers bringing these new models to life. We’ll talk about what’s working, what’s not and how to move towards whole person health rapidly and equitably across the US.

The Other 80 Claudia Williams

    • Health & Fitness
    • 5.0 • 9 Ratings

The Other 80 podcast — brought to you by Claudia Williams at UC Berkeley School of Public Health — hosts real, honest dialogue about the things that help keep people healthy beyond traditional medical care, like housing, social connections and food, and the cutting edge policies, research and programs supporting whole person health. Join former White House advisor, entrepreneur and host Claudia Williams for deep conversations with the innovators, implementers, researchers and policymakers bringing these new models to life. We’ll talk about what’s working, what’s not and how to move towards whole person health rapidly and equitably across the US.

    The Patient-Led Revolution with Susannah Fox

    The Patient-Led Revolution with Susannah Fox

    Today’s guest is Susannah Fox, author of Rebel Health: A Field Guide to the Patient-Led Revolution in Medical Care. The book is a deep dive into the expert network of patients, survivors and caregivers who are charting a new path of innovation and research. It is for anyone who feels alone, forgotten or lost in the shadows of suffering as they navigate a new diagnosis. But, it’s also for anyone working inside healthcare who is fed up with the status quo. 
    We discuss:
    How patients – like those first affected by long COVID - accelerate solutions by making invisible problems visible That data liberation is often the foundation for patient rebel movementsThe pop up peer groups forming in Amazon reviewsA framework for understanding, and embracing patient expertise: seekers, networkers, solvers and champions
    Susannah reminds all innovators to talk with people living with rare and life-changing diagnoses:
    “If you are going to try to understand the intersection of healthcare and technology, you need to put down your clipboard – which is the classic status symbol of a survey researcher – and get out there and just talk to people. Talk to people especially who are dealing with rare and life-changing diagnoses, because those are the people who are going to use technology in ways that we can't even imagine.”
    Relevant Links
    Susannah’s book Rebel Health
    Susannah’s blog: Wow! How? Health
    An article about how patient-led research could speed up medical innovation
    A story about Tidepool Loop receiving FDA clearance
    OpenAPS and #WeAreNotWaiting
    Hugo Campos’s TedX talk about not being able to access his cardiac device data
    Graphic used by Sarah Riggare to show the time spent in self-care for Parkinson’s disease
    About Our Guest
    Susannah Fox is a health and technology strategist. Her book, Rebel Health: A Field Guide to the Patient-Led Revolution in Medical Care, was recently published by MIT Press. She is a former Chief Technology Officer for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services during the Obama Administration, where she led an open data and innovation lab. Prior to federal service, she was the entrepreneur-in-residence at the  Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. For 14 years she directed the health portfolio at the Pew Research Center’s Internet Project where she helped define a new market at the intersection of health, social media, and patient engagement.  Fox currently serves on the board of directors of Cambia Health Solutions of Portland, OR, and Hive Networks of Cincinnati, OH. She is an advisor to Alladapt Immunotherapeutics, Archangels, Article 27, Atlas of Caregiving, Before Brands, Citizen, Equip Health, Faster Cures, and the Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation at Smithsonian Institution. Fox is a graduate of Wesleyan University with a degree in anthropology. She is the mother of two children, a caregiver for elders, and lives in Washington, DC,...

    • 42 min
    COVID Leadership Lessons with Dr. Tomás Aragón

    COVID Leadership Lessons with Dr. Tomás Aragón

    We'll be unpacking lessons from the COVID 19 pandemic for many years to come. Dr. Tomás Aragón, who leads public health for the State of California, joins us to discuss what he learned guiding America's most populous state through this challenging and disruptive period. 
    We discuss:
    That public health’s deepest power lies in the ability to help diverse groups reach consensus under great uncertaintyHow California redeployed an army of census workers to support the COVID responseThe biggest opportunities to use AI for public healthThree great book recommendations: “How Emotions Are Made” by Lisa Feldman Barrett, “High Conflict” by Amanda Ripley and “Fifth Discipline” by Peter M. Senge
    Dr. Aragón shared insights about leadership: 
    “The other thing is to really appreciate the importance of human psychology. It is so incredibly important … You're going to come up against people who are going to “resist”. I don't think of it as resistance. I just think they're being human. That's just all it is. People have variability in how they process information … And so rather than seeing things as resistance, you really just see it as part of the diversity of ingenuity that exists in an organizational culture.” 
    Relevant Links
    Dr. Tomás Aragón’s UC Berkeley Public Health profile
    Dr. Tomás Aragón’s GitHub blog
    Article on Bay Area pandemic response: The epidemiology and surveillance response to pandemic influenza A (H1N1) among local health departments in the San Francisco Bay Area
    “How Emotions Are Made” by Lisa Feldman Barrett
    “High Conflict” by Amanda Ripley 
    “Fifth Discipline” by Peter M. Senge
    About Our Guest
    Dr. Tomás Aragón, MD, DrPH, has served as the director of the California Department of Public Health and the State Public Health Officer, since January 4, 2021. Prior to coming to CDPH, he was the health officer for the City and County of San Francisco and director of the public health division. Dr. Aragón has served in public health leadership roles for more than 20 years (communicable disease controller, deputy health officer, health officer, community health and chronic disease epidemiologist), including directing a public health emergency preparedness and response research and training center at the University of California, Berkeley School of Public Health.
    Connect With Us
    For more information on The Other 80 please visit our website - www.theother80.com. To connect with our team, please email claudia@theother80.com and follow us on twitter @claudiawilliams and LinkedIn.

    • 42 min
    Untangling AI Bias with Dr. Ziad Obermeyer

    Untangling AI Bias with Dr. Ziad Obermeyer

    Using AI in healthcare comes with a lot of promise - but access to data, lack of clarity about who will pay for these tools and the challenge of creating algorithms without bias are holding us back.
    In 2023, TIME named Dr. Ziad Obermeyer one of the 100 most influential people working in AI. As a professor at UC Berkeley School of Public Health, and the co-founder of a non-profit and a startup in the AI healthcare space, his work centers on how to leverage AI to improve health and avoid racial bias.
    We discuss:
    The idea of a safe harbor for companies to discuss and resolve AI challengesHow his company Dandelion Health is helping solve the data log jam for AI product testingWhy academics need to spend time “on the shop floor”The simple framework for avoiding AI bias he shared in his recent testimony to the Senate Finance Committee
    Ziad says without access to the right data, AI systems can’t offer equitable solutions: 
    “I think data is the biggest bottleneck to these things, and that bottleneck is even more binding in less well-resourced hospitals… When we look around and we see, ‘well, there are all these health algorithms that are in medical journals and people are publishing about them’. The majority of those things come from Palo Alto, Rochester, Minnesota [and] Boston. And, those patients are wonderful and they deserve to have algorithms trained on them and learning about them, but they are not representative of the rest of the country – let alone the rest of the world. And so, we have these huge disparities in the data from which algorithms are learning. And then those mirror the disparities and where algorithms can be applied.”
    Relevant Links
    Dr. Obermeyer’s profile at UC Berkeley School of Public Health
    Ziad Obermeyer’s testimony to the Senate Finance Committee on how AI can help healthcare
    More about Nightingale Open Science
    More about Dandelion Health
    Article on dissecting racial bias in algorithms
    Article On the Inequity of Predicting A While Hoping for B. AER: P&P 2021 (with Sendhil Mullainathan)
    About Our Guest
    Dr. Ziad Obermeyer is the Blue Cross of California Distinguished Associate Professor of Health Policy and Management at UC Berkeley School of Public Health. His research uses machine learning to help doctors make better decisions, and help researchers make new discoveries—by ‘seeing’ the world the way algorithms do. His work on algorithmic racial bias has impacted how many organizations build and use algorithms, and how lawmakers and regulators hold AI accountable. He is a cofounder of Nightingale Open Science and Dandelion Health, a Chan Zuckerberg Biohub Investigator, a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and was named one of the 100 most influential people in AI by TIME. Previously, he was...

    • 43 min
    Tragic and Preventable with Dr. Monica McLemore

    Tragic and Preventable with Dr. Monica McLemore

    Black women in the US are 3-4 times more likely to die than white women from a pregnancy-related cause and overall the US has the highest rate of maternal mortality in the industrialized world. These deaths are preventable.
    Dr. Monica McLemore, a Professor at the University of Washington School of Nursing, says we should stop blaming women for their own deaths and instead address the underlying social and healthcare drivers that impact pregnancy outcomes. In other words, we need to focus on the other 80.
    We discuss:
    The Momnibus, a comprehensive legislative package to improve maternal health in the US which has still not been passed into lawHow disruptive periods, such as the COVID-19 pandemic and Dobbs, provide opportunities to re-imagine maternal and child health in the USWhy community-centered research is essential for improving health equity
    Monica says we need to change our views on scientific evidence: 
    “There is no way we're going to get … changes in health outcomes at a population level if you don't bring the social and the clinical together, it's just not happening. And so that requires a change in mindset of the scientific community about what is evidence, who generates evidence, who can contribute to evidence, what evidence is needed and what methods are we going to use to obtain said evidence? Because community is over extraction. They are over participating in studies and not getting anything back. They are over funding science as taxpayers and not being able to access it.”
    Relevant Links
    CDC’s Report on Maternal Mortality 
    JAMA Articles on trends in maternal mortality:
    https://edhub.ama-assn.org/jn-learning/audio-player/18796651https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2806661?utm_source=podcast_platforms&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=related_article_links
    Summary of JAMA webinar on maternal mortality
    Op-Ed: How We Can Reimagine Black Maternal Health in the Changed Landscape of Dobbs
    Centering the health of mothers
    To Prevent Women from Dying in Childbirth First Stop Blaming Them
    About Our Guest
    Monica McLemore is a preeminent scholar of antiracist birth equity research, community-informed methods, and policy translation. Dr. McLemore is a Professor in the Department of Child, Family, and Population Health Nursing at the University of Washington School of Nursing. She earned a bachelor’s degree in Nursing from The College of New Jersey in 1993 after declaring at eight years old that she would become a nurse. She has a Master’s in Public Health from San Francisco State University and a PhD in Oncology Genomics at the University of California, San Francisco. She’s worked her entire career in reproductive health, rights, and justice. Monica retired from active...

    • 42 min
    A Just Cause with Karen Dale

    A Just Cause with Karen Dale

    What is your just cause? Karen Dale is DC Market President for Amerihealth Caritas. She is a bold and fearless leader whose “Why” is to be a catalyst for change to promote equity and deeply support people encountering difficulties. In this episode she shares the leadership practices that support this work from sharing power, to community co-design and embracing disagreement on teams. 
    We discuss:
    A powerful partnership with the Children’s Law CenterThe path to value-based payment for community organizationsThe future of public health education: providing the system, structure and culture that encourages every student to be a catalyst for positive changeHow DC is starting to address decades of under-investment in Wards 7 and 8 through its equity budget review
    Karen discusses the just cause for a school of public health in today’s world: 
    “It would be to create … a system, structure and culture that infuses what every student needs to be a catalyst for positive change for human beings … [A] school that creates that culture, gives people the tools, gives them the encouragement, gives them the freedom to try and fail, but learn and apply – that would be amazing. Because … we need a whole generation of people who are in the fight.”
    Relevant Links
    Karen’s commencement address to George Mason grads
    NPR piece on partnership with Children’s Law Center
    New payment approaches for EPSDT
    Guidance for Health Care Entities Partnering with Community-Based Organizations: Addressing Health-Related Social Needs in Alternative Payment Models. [hcp-lan.org]

    About Our Guest
    Karen M. Dale is Market President for AmeriHealth Caritas District of Columbia, a mission-based Medicaid Managed Care Organization in Washington, D.C., and the Chief Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Officer for the AmeriHealth Caritas Family of Companies. Her focus includes applying a health equity lens to impact all levels of policies, processes, decisions, laws, and outcomes for the communities AmeriHealth Caritas serves.
    She also leads a decidedly metric-driven business approach to mobilize leaders and accelerate strategies to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion inside and outside the walls of AmeriHealth Caritas. As a result, opportunities for people to experience health, wholeness, and belonging are enhanced by addressing the social, economic, and environmental conditions that are drivers of poor health.
    Her hobbies include gardening, creating healthy Caribbean recipes, traveling, and watching her son’s soccer games.
    Connect With Us
    For more information on The Other 80 please visit our website - www.theother80.com. To connect with our team, please email claudia@theother80.com and follow us on twitter...

    • 42 min
    People-Centered Policy Design with Natalie Davis

    People-Centered Policy Design with Natalie Davis

    We may be politically divided, but when it comes to healthcare there is actually a lot we agree on as a nation. We want healthcare that is affordable. We want a healthcare system that is easy to understand and navigate. We want to know we will receive good care when we need it most. These insights are something our guest Natalie Davis takes to heart in her work at United States of Care. She and her team are fighting hard to help create a more dependable healthcare system for diverse and underserved Americans.
    We discuss:
    Why we should never use the term “value-based care” ever again.Braidwood vs. Becerra: The court case that may eliminate free preventive services for half of all Americans.The double whammy of US healthcare: system failures and personal shame.How to nurture listening and belonging on a team.
    Natalie says before you start listening, you need to consider who is being failed by the healthcare system and prioritize hearing their stories:
    “If we look at something like maternal health – which is a work that we're doing right now – if you look at the data, it is women of color, especially Black women who are left behind and facing a real failure of our system, which is causing morbidity and mortality. And so, for our organization, we are listening loudly to Black women and we are talking to people in communit[ies], we are talking in focus groups to really make sure we understand those issues. Because, if the people who are not served by this healthcare system are listened to and then served it will make the healthcare system function better for all of us.”
    Relevant Links
    United States of Care's website
    United Solutions for Care
    Patient-First Care (a.k.a. Value-Based Care) Messaging Findings
    United States of Care Preventive Services Resource Hub
    Insight Report from November 2023
    The amicus brief United States of Care submitted on Braidwood vs. Becerra

    About Our Guest
    Natalie Davis has worked for nearly two decades shaping and implementing American health care policies to improve the lives of all people. In 2018, she and fellow national health care leader Andy Slavitt launched United States of Care to ensure that everyone in the country has access to quality, affordable health care regardless of health status, social need, or income. She is relentless in her person-centered approach to building health care solutions and has a history of building partnerships – with organizations, patient advocacy groups and everyday people – that work to create positive change in our country’s health care system. From 2010-2016, Natalie served at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, with the final two years as Senior Advisor to former CMS Administrator, Andy Slavitt. In 2017, Natalie served as the Director of Strategic Engagement at the Bipartisan Policy Center. A social entrepreneur, Natalie also helped found Town Hall Ventures and The Medicaid Transformation Project, both of which focus on bringing the best of innovation and care

    • 42 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
9 Ratings

9 Ratings

Emily Frances ,

Refreshing, smart and kind conversations about health

Claudia Williams is uniquely talented at bringing the most innovative healthcare leaders to the table and leading a dialogue that changes how you think of our health in the future. The Other 80 is a must-listen for anyone involved in building healthcare systems that truly deliver on better lives. I especially loved the conversation with Dr. Sachin Jain - which quickly turned into a master class on medical ethics and a frank discussion of the leadership crisis in our sector.

Top Podcasts In Health & Fitness

Huberman Lab
Scicomm Media
Passion Struck with John R. Miles
John R. Miles
Feel Better, Live More with Dr Rangan Chatterjee
Dr Rangan Chatterjee: GP & Author
On Purpose with Jay Shetty
iHeartPodcasts
Ten Percent Happier with Dan Harris
Ten Percent Happier
The Peter Attia Drive
Peter Attia, MD

You Might Also Like

The Ezra Klein Show
New York Times Opinion
The Daily
The New York Times
Today, Explained
Vox
Consider This from NPR
NPR
On with Kara Swisher
Vox Media
Up First
NPR