82 episodes

Go on an adventure into unexpected corners of the health and science world each week with award-winning host Maiken Scott. The Pulse takes you behind the doors of operating rooms, into the lab with some of the world's foremost scientists, and back in time to explore life-changing innovations. The Pulse delivers stories in ways that matter to you, and answers questions you never knew you had.

The Pulse NPR

    • Science
    • 4.6 • 274 Ratings

Go on an adventure into unexpected corners of the health and science world each week with award-winning host Maiken Scott. The Pulse takes you behind the doors of operating rooms, into the lab with some of the world's foremost scientists, and back in time to explore life-changing innovations. The Pulse delivers stories in ways that matter to you, and answers questions you never knew you had.

    The DIY Medicine Movement

    The DIY Medicine Movement

    DIY culture is all about empowerment — teaching yourself new skills to do things on your own, like retiling your bathroom or fixing a leaky faucet. But what happens when the DIY approach extends to something as complicated and potentially dangerous as medicine?

    On this episode, we take a look at the growing number of patients who are taking health care into their own hands — experimenting with DIY treatments ranging from brain stimulation to homemade wound ointments. We hear about a man who developed a cure for his persistent infection in his garage, find out why so many people are flocking to DIY medicine, and learn how one researcher carefully evaluates his patients' DIY approaches.

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    • 48 min
    The Search for Modern Masculinity

    The Search for Modern Masculinity

    Competent. Capable. Strong. Stoic. Provider. Protector. Leader. Patriarch. These are the kinds of words that we've long associated with masculinity and manhood — but in recent decades, ideas of what it means to be a man have undergone drastic changes.

    As women have gained ground in education and careers, politics and culture, the role of men has shifted. They're no longer automatically assumed to be the main breadwinners, the decision-makers or leaders. And a lot of the "masculine" attributes that were once considered virtues — decisiveness, stoicism, paternalism — are now sometimes seen as problematic. In other words, the old script for what it means to be a man has been torn up. But some experts say that script has not really been replaced, leading many men and boys to feel destabilized and lost.

    On this episode, we explore how our ideas of masculinity are changing — why there seems to be a void of positive messages, the lure of the manosphere, and how men are reinventing and re-envisioning their roles. Also — a look at how being more deeply involved in caring for babies and children is affecting men's brains.

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    • 55 min
    10th Anniversary Show: The Science Changing Our Lives

    10th Anniversary Show: The Science Changing Our Lives

    When it comes to science, it's often the flashiest stories that grab headlines — the cancer breakthroughs, the tech innovations, the discoveries of new species or distant stars. But there's also plenty of science that, while it may not make a huge splash, is quietly changing the way we live.On this episode, The Pulse celebrates its 10-year anniversary with a special live show that turns the spotlight on the science changing our everyday lives. We talk with a pediatrician and engineer whose work has transformed the way children travel – and saved countless lives; host Maiken Scott volunteers as a guinea pig for neurologists studying brain stimulation; and we hear from a biologist whose early-career quest changed the way she thinks about her work.

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    • 48 min
    How Art and Science Intersect

    How Art and Science Intersect

    On this rebroadcast of The Pulse - We often think of art and science as existing in different — even opposite — spheres. One revolves around creativity and imagination; the other around observable facts and data — and never the twain shall meet.But really, art and science aren't as far apart as we might think. For centuries, artists have drawn on the natural sciences, and the wonders of the natural world, as inspiration for some of our most celebrated works.

    On this episode, we explore the hidden architecture of science that often underlies music, literature, and more. We talk with a mathematician who makes the case that math is key to appreciating literature on a whole new level; a pianist who reveals how the natural world inspired some of classical music's most iconic composers; and an artist whose work on water blurs the lines between art, ecology, and activism.

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    • 48 min
    When Being 'Gifted' No Longer Feels Like a Gift

    When Being 'Gifted' No Longer Feels Like a Gift

    When psychologist Lewis Terman launched his decades-long study of high-IQ children in 1921, he had a specific goal in mind: to prove that "gifted" people were born leaders, and superior in just about every way. Although his theory didn't pan out, Terman did kick off national interest in identifying and cultivating intellectually gifted children.Just over a century later, experts in science, education, and psychology are grappling with questions about how we define giftedness, who qualifies as gifted, how we should teach and treat gifted children, and where the limits of their talents lie.

    On this episode, we hear stories about the challenges of growing up gifted, how musical prodigies are made — and identified, and what a chess wunderkind has to teach us about the value of raw talent vs. experience.

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    • 48 min
    Lightening the Load of Motherhood

    Lightening the Load of Motherhood

    We hear all the time about the joys of motherhood — the incomparable sense of love, the magic of watching your kids discover the world, the pride and fulfillment of seeing them grow. But motherhood can also be a grind. These days, moms are expected not only to care for their kids, but to grow their careers — all while juggling housework, swimming lessons, doctor's appointments, play groups, the family calendar, and more.On this episode, we take a look at the experience of modern motherhood — the challenges, the sometimes impossible standards, and strategies some moms have developed to not just maintain their sanity but to thrive. We talk with therapist Erica Djossa about her new book "Releasing the Mother Load: How to Carry Less and Enjoy Motherhood More," hear about how one surgeon successfully pushed her department to become more friendly to new mothers, and how a diagnosis of breast cancer changed and deepened the bond between a mother and her son.

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    • 48 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
274 Ratings

274 Ratings

Zelda1954 ,

Gem

Of all the podcasts I subscribe to (mostly public radio shows, but not exclusively), “The Pulse” is the one I find consistently interesting and worth hearing to the episode’s end. The subject matter is fresh, even unexpected at times, and well produced. The host, Maiken Scott, is easy to listen to. Other podcast producers, who seem to think just throwing a couple talkers before a microphone to improvise, would do well to study this one to see how it’s done.

Ted Post ,

Illegally fired its talent and lost

The Pluse and WHYY illegally fired one of their staff for having his own stand up show. Then they wasted hundreds of thousands of dollars of listener’s donated funds on lawyers to fight this. Well, WHYY and The Pulse lost! Amazingly disappointing that an NPR member station would spend its funds fighting its own employees union.

Kmo76 ,

HSCT works for MS

Thank you for sharing Jessie’s story. This could have been my story…except my husband has stayed by my side throughout my MS journey.
I went to Mexico in April 2017 for HSCT. I had been living with MS for over 16 years and didn't fit the trial criteria in the US. There are thousands of us who have gone and are doing great! Dr Ruiz is using a non-myelo protocol because it is less risky and still highly effective. I have been off all meds for 4 and a half years, I can run or bike for miles, lift weights and have no MS progression, my MRIs are stable. Freedman is uninformed and can’t accept that his theories are wrong!

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