66 episodes

Go on an adventure into unexpected corners of the health and science world each week with award-winning host Maiken Scott. The Pulse takes you behind the doors of operating rooms, into the lab with some of the world's foremost scientists, and back in time to explore life-changing innovations. The Pulse delivers stories in ways that matter to you, and answers questions you never knew you had.

The Pulse NPR

    • Science
    • 4.6 • 270 Ratings

Go on an adventure into unexpected corners of the health and science world each week with award-winning host Maiken Scott. The Pulse takes you behind the doors of operating rooms, into the lab with some of the world's foremost scientists, and back in time to explore life-changing innovations. The Pulse delivers stories in ways that matter to you, and answers questions you never knew you had.

    Bodies for Science

    Bodies for Science

    If you're training to become a physician, your first patient is usually dead. In fact, "first patient" is what med students call the human cadavers that they work on in anatomy class — when they first learn to make careful incisions, and lay eyes on the beautiful intricacies of bone, muscle, blood vessels, and organs that make our bodies work.Human cadavers have long played a crucial role in medicine and science. They not only teach generations of doctors about the human body — they allow researchers to learn valuable lessons about everything from the causes of rare diseases to the effects of how we live our lives. But how do bodies end up on dissection tables in the first place? What can they still teach us? And why do people choose to donate their remains?

    On this episode, we explore bodies donated to science — how they're used, why they're so important, and why people make this choice for their remains. We hear stories about one woman's mission to recruit future medical cadavers, and how 19th century medical schools got involved in body snatching. We'll take a closer look at a program that connects med students to the families of their "first patients," and find out why one firefighter has opted for a future in the Body Worlds exhibition.

    Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    NPR Privacy Policy

    • 47 min
    All the Rage

    All the Rage

    You can feel it coming on — your face flushes hot, maybe your fists clench, your heartbeat speeds up and blood pressure rises. It's rage — and it can go from zero to red-hot in a matter of seconds. Best-case scenario, it disappears just as fast. Worst-case scenario — it completely takes over. It's normal to feel angry when you or somebody else has been wronged, mistreated, or hurt. But even justified rage can become destructive, like a wrecking ball ruining careers and relationships. So, how do we handle these fiery emotions when they erupt? On this episode — how to deal with anger and rage. We learn about healthy ways of expressing our ire; the rise of "rage rooms" and what psychologists have to say about them; and what causes toddlers to throw such terrible tantrums.

    Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    NPR Privacy Policy

    • 48 min
    The Mysteries of Attraction

    The Mysteries of Attraction

    It can show up as a spark or a lightning bolt; a glance or a touch; an easy rapport or butterflies in your stomach. Attraction — it's a feeling we know when we experience it, but we're often not sure exactly what fuels it. Is it about looks or personality? Psychology or chemistry? Instant fireworks or long-term compatibility? On this episode, we explore the mysteries of attraction — what kindles it, what kills it, and why we're often totally wrong about who we might be attracted to. We talk with a leading attraction researcher about the factors that determine attraction, and why he often advises people to follow their gut. We find out what dating apps — and the massive amounts of data they gather — are teaching researchers about who we're drawn to and why. And we hear the story of a couple whose mutual attraction changed over time — and why that turned out to be a good thing.

    Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    NPR Privacy Policy

    • 48 min
    Setting the Medical Record Straight

    Setting the Medical Record Straight

    Medical records are an important part of health care. They create a history of past issues, test results, and medications. They paint a picture of somebody's general health. Patients now have more access than ever before to their records, and these changes have come with some growing pains — like receiving test results straight from the lab, before their doctor can review them, or discovering mistakes. On this episode, we crack open those medical records to get a better sense of how they can help and hinder care. We'll hear about how physicians struggle to access different parts of the record to create a cohesive picture of a patient's health. We dig into issues around law enforcement accessing these records, and why they're so valuable to hackers.

    Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    NPR Privacy Policy

    • 50 min
    Inside Facebook: A Conversation with Jeff Horwitz

    Inside Facebook: A Conversation with Jeff Horwitz

    After covering the 2016 U.S. presidential election, reporter Jeff Horwitz knew that "something really weird was going on," that social media sites, especially Facebook, had played a role in shaping the election. But how — exactly? In his new book, "Broken Code: Inside Facebook and the Fight to Expose Its Harmful Secrets," Horwitz details his chase to crack open this notoriously secretive black box that is Facebook. Host Maiken Scott talks to Horwitz about the powerful algorithms that favored engagement above all else, that not just amplified specific content, but started to shape everything from what we see, to what we post, to how politicians design their campaigns. Horwitz covers technology for The Wall Street Journal and was one of the reporters on the award-winning series "The Facebook Files."

    Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    NPR Privacy Policy

    • 36 min
    Facebook at 20

    Facebook at 20

    Twenty years ago, a group of college sophomores created a website that would end up changing the world — fundamentally altering how we connect with other people, how much we know about each other, and how we curate our existence. That website was Facebook.In the years since, Facebook quickly grew from a quirky site for college students to a global powerhouse — one that can affect everything from how we feel about ourselves to the outcomes of elections.On this episode, a look at Facebook as it turns 20 — its history, its ongoing impact, and what we really know about how it operates. We hear stories about a curious coincidence linking Facebook to a defunct government surveillance project, why many researchers have mixed feelings about Facebook, and how the website's ever-changing features transformed the lives and mental health of young people.

    Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    NPR Privacy Policy

    • 50 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
270 Ratings

270 Ratings

Zelda1954 ,

Gem

Of all the podcasts I subscribe to (mostly public radio shows, but not exclusively), “The Pulse” is the one I find consistently interesting and worth hearing to the episode’s end. The subject matter is fresh, even unexpected at times, and well produced. The host, Maiken Scott, is easy to listen to. Other podcast producers, who seem to think just throwing a couple talkers before a microphone to improvise, would do well to study this one to see how it’s done.

Ted Post ,

Illegally fired its talent and lost

The Pluse and WHYY illegally fired one of their staff for having his own stand up show. Then they wasted hundreds of thousands of dollars of listener’s donated funds on lawyers to fight this. Well, WHYY and The Pulse lost! Amazingly disappointing that an NPR member station would spend its funds fighting its own employees union.

Kmo76 ,

HSCT works for MS

Thank you for sharing Jessie’s story. This could have been my story…except my husband has stayed by my side throughout my MS journey.
I went to Mexico in April 2017 for HSCT. I had been living with MS for over 16 years and didn't fit the trial criteria in the US. There are thousands of us who have gone and are doing great! Dr Ruiz is using a non-myelo protocol because it is less risky and still highly effective. I have been off all meds for 4 and a half years, I can run or bike for miles, lift weights and have no MS progression, my MRIs are stable. Freedman is uninformed and can’t accept that his theories are wrong!

Top Podcasts In Science

Hidden Brain, Shankar Vedantam
Mike Carruthers | OmniCast Media | Cumulus Podcast Network
WNYC Studios
Alie Ward
Neil deGrasse Tyson
Sam Harris

You Might Also Like

Hidden Brain, Shankar Vedantam
KERA
NPR
NPR
WNYC Studios
NPR

More by WHYY

WHYY
WHYY
WHYY
WHYY
WHYY
WHYY