51 episodes

The Therapists Uncut Podcast is an informative, self-help podcast that makes mental health relatable and a part of your everyday conversation. Join off-the-clock therapists who happen to be friends for good laughs, guest interviews and, at times, difficult conversations on all things mental health including, anxiety, trauma, relationships, work stress, First Responder mental health, grief, parenting and more! Tune in every 1st and 3rd Monday with co-hosts Alyssa Najera, Licensed Clinical Social Worker and Nikki Young, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. This is an AMP Smart Business Production.

Therapists Uncut Podcast Alyssa Najera, LCSW, Nikki Young, LCSW

    • Health & Fitness
    • 5.0 • 37 Ratings

The Therapists Uncut Podcast is an informative, self-help podcast that makes mental health relatable and a part of your everyday conversation. Join off-the-clock therapists who happen to be friends for good laughs, guest interviews and, at times, difficult conversations on all things mental health including, anxiety, trauma, relationships, work stress, First Responder mental health, grief, parenting and more! Tune in every 1st and 3rd Monday with co-hosts Alyssa Najera, Licensed Clinical Social Worker and Nikki Young, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. This is an AMP Smart Business Production.

    Get To Know Your Co-Hosts Nikki Young and Alyssa Najera

    Get To Know Your Co-Hosts Nikki Young and Alyssa Najera

     
    Don’t miss out on this episode where we get to know our co-hosts Nikki Young, LMFT and Alyssa Najera, LCSW. Get know them a little more as they answer listener questions on their favorite family activities, college memories, and of course, why they started a podcast.
    In this episode we talk about:
    Watch as our co-hosts play rapid fire and answer questions about themselves such as:
    Your favorite outdoor activity? Favorite tv show? Favorite type of music genre or artist? Favorite way to spend time with family? Favorite food? What would you be found doing on a Wednesday night? Your dream car? You dream vacation? If you were an animal, which one would you be? Number of tattoos? Who would you want to have a conversation with – dead or alive? Favorite ice cream flavor? Favorite color? Favorite movie? Favorite musical instrument? Favorite college memory? Do you have any special talents? Favorite superhero? Favorite childhood memory? If you could live anywhere. Where would you live? Why did you start a podcast??  
    Therapists Uncut Challenge:
    We want to learn more about you! Answer any or all of the questions below!
    Tell us your hometown Favorite Halloween Movie Favorite decade of all time Resources mentioned:
    We’ve pulled together any resources mentioned in this episode and put together some links:
    Thank you for allowing us into your lives and helping us make mental health more relatable and a part of your everyday conversation! For more information or to access all episodes visit TherapistsUncut.com.
     
    What is the Therapists Uncut Podcast:
    The Therapists Uncut Podcast is a light-hearted, informative self-help podcast for grown-ups. It is hosted by off-the-clock therapists hoping to validate your experiences, normalize therapy and therapists, and help you prioritize your mental health.
    Who are the Therapists Uncut Podcast Co-Hosts:
    Nikki Young is co-host of Therapists Uncut and a Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist. Nikki keeps it personable and professional. Yet, she always manages to keep the Therapists Uncut family and followers laughing. You may find her squirreling through topics, stories, or jokes, and all in good fun. Don't worry because someone will bring her back around to the conversation. Nikki is a licensed marriage and family therapist in her private practice located in Modesto, CA, and she is also a Crisis Junkie at heart. In addition to being co-owner of a group private practice, she is also a crisis clinician responding to local mental health crisis and emergencies. Learn more about Nikki at catalystcounselinginc.com
    Alyssa Najera is co-host of Therapists Uncut and a Licensed Clinical Social Worker. Alyssa is typically calm and composed on most days, but often has difficulty containing her excitement about the little things in life. She loves to laugh, spread positivity, and is often caught with a smile on her face. Alyssa is also a Child Welfare Services social worker and supervisor alumni, previous child sexual abuse forensic interviewer, trainer and consultant, and CEO of a group private practice in the small town of Oakdale, CA. Learn more about Alyssa at smalltowncounselingca.com or alyssanajera.com.
    Disclaimer:
    Thank you for joining Therapists Uncut, a production of AMP Smart Business. To learn more about Therapists Uncut and stay up on upcoming episodes, please subscribe and follow us on social media. As a reminder, although the Therapists Uncut co-hosts are licensed therapists, they are not your therapist. This podcast is not intended to substitute professional mental health counseling. If you need professional therapy, please contact your local provider or primary care provider.  Thanks for listening and we’ll see you on the next episode of Therapists Uncut!
    Social Media Links
    Instagram @therapistsuncut
    Facebook @therapistsuncut
    Credits:
    Therapists Uncut is a production of AMP Smart Business.
    Voice Over by Alexia Gloria

    • 10 min
    “How Fair Fighting Can Save Your Relationship”

    “How Fair Fighting Can Save Your Relationship”

     
    We all disagree with our partner at some point. Disagreements are normal and healthy, but how we disagree is a foundational component of our relationships.  In this episode, Nikki Young, LMFT, and Alyssa Najera, LCSW, discuss the importance of communicating respectfully and effectively by using fair fighting or as we call it, Kosher Conflict.  
     
    In this episode we talk about:
    Types of problems within a relationship:
    Solvable problems: issues that are situational or can be perceived as one-off type of conflict. Unsolvable problems: Issues that stay consistent and in 15 years from now it will still be a problem. What makes a difference in a disagreement is how you choose to engage, response, and recognize your own personal triggers.
     
    Why should I practice Fair Fighting and Kosher Conflict?
    It is important to understand that when our stress levels go up, our communication skills go down. We tend to make ourselves more vulnerable with people we trust which may result in giving our poorest level of communication When fighting around children, they pick up on certain mannerisms and communication skills. It is important to model how your child should discuss issues and be treated during conflict with a partner. Practicing Kosher conflict can provide you and your partner resolution, understanding, and increased emotional and physical intimacy.  
    How do I practice Fair Fighting and Kosher Conflict?
    Understand what triggers your fight, flight, or freeze response and choose to respond instead of react in a disagreement Your cool down or timeout periods can range from 5 minutes to 5 hours, it will vary After your timeout, come back to the topic and discuss the issue at hand effectively It is important to come back to the topic or the other person may feel abandoned in the situation. Notice your partner can usually recognize when you might be getting worked up ‘We’ve been married for 10 years and … the other day he told me, “Okay, I’m going to end this conversation because your nose is flaring and you keep blinking at me”’- Alyssa Najera, LCSW  
    How should I communicate?
    Avoid criticizing the other person and use “I” statements vs “you” statements. This prevents the other person from feeling blamed and causing their defense walls to go up. “I feel unheard. I would appreciate if I could share what I'm trying to share, it would make me feel heard.” - Nikki Young, LMFC “I'm feeling unheard. Here’s what I need...” “I feel unheard, if I'm able to share what I want to share it will make me feel heard” Avoid name calling or yelling Discuss your partner’s boundaries and needs Many couples use humor to defuse situations while other couples may take humor as the conversation not being taken seriously Remember, Kosher conflict is not a natural way to communicate and takes effort. Avoid spiraling the topic into other topics  
    Full transcription available at end of post.
     
    Therapists Uncut Challenge:
    If you have a partner, watch this episode together and discuss how you both can effectively practice fair fighting in the future.
     
    Resources mentioned:
    We’ve pulled together any resources mentioned in this episode and put together some links:
    https://www.cnvc.org/online-learning/nvc-instruction-guide/nvc-instruction-guide
    https://www.thehotline.org/
    Thank you for allowing us into your lives and helping us make mental health more relatable and a part of your everyday conversation! For more resourced or to access all episodes visit TherapistsUncut.com.
     
    What is the Therapists Uncut Podcast:
    The Therapists Uncut Podcast is a light-hearted, informative self-help podcast for grown-ups. It is hosted by three off-the-clock therapists hoping to validate your experiences, normalize therapy and therapists, and help you prioritize your mental health.
    Who are the Therapists Uncut Podcast Co-Hosts:
    Nikki Young is co-host of Therapists Uncut and a Licensed Marr

    • 29 min
    Emotion Contagion

    Emotion Contagion

     
    Ever heard the saying “smile, it’s contagious"? Turns out it’s true!  A smile, along with other facial expressions and vocalizations, has the power to influence the emotions and behaviors of others. In this episode, Alyssa Najera, LCSW, and Nikki Young, LMFT discuss just how infectious emotions can be through the lens of Emotion Contagion, and the importance of being cautious of who and what you surround yourself with.
     
    In this episode we talk about:
    What is Emotion Contagion?
    Research dating back to the early 90’s defines emotion contagion as the tendency to automatically mimic and synchronize facial expressions, vocalizations, postures, and movements with those of another person and consequently to emerge emotionally. This means that our behaviors mimic how we feel and can also influence others to mimic our behaviors, as well. Noted, everyone has a unique and individualized scale specific to them that determines how susceptible to emotion contagion they may be. Studies also show that a person is typically more inclined to feel these effects when coming from a person whom they are closer to.
     
    Why is understanding emotion contagion important?
    The famous phrase “Do as I say, not as I do”, has been around for many years. When we consider emotion contagion in our behavior, it makes more sense to model the behavior we are trying to encourage rather than try to convince others to act a certain way when your actions are not reflecting it.
    An example of emotion contagion can be modeled in a work environment by the boss setting the mood for the day. If a boss is grumpy and has a bad attitude, that can reflect onto his/her employees. On the contrary, if a boss is upbeat, positive, and encouraging, the work environment will have a much more positive effect on the employees’ mood.
    It is also important to understand how media sources (such as social media, the news, etc.) have an effect of your mood. Think about how you feel after you turn off the news or when actors in a commercial or movie have the ability to elicit certain emotions from the viewers. Recognize how your environment is impacting your emotions and mood both positively and negatively.
     
    Study Done on Emotion Contagion
    A Facebook research study was done in 2014, to investigate how the content of a user’s Facebook feed impacts the content of the user’s personal posts.  (Cornell Chronicle, 2014). Facebook infused the new content it gave to some of its users with more positive updates, while the remaining users were given negative updates on their feed. They then analyzed the results and discovered the people who received more positive feed were likely to post positive content, while the people who received more negative feed began to post more negative content. For more on this study visit the Cornell Chronicle.
     
    Full transcription available at end of post.
     
    Therapists Uncut Challenge:
    Step 1: Pick two friends/family members who are willing to participate in a small, social experiment. come up with one sentence that could be taken multiple ways.
    Step 2: text this same sentence to both individuals but, include a different emoji for each message - one being more positive and the other being more negative.
    Step 3: immediately Explore their reactions, together. Discuss how emotion contagion might occur via text.  
     
    Resources mentioned:
    We’ve pulled together any resources mentioned in this episode and put together some links:
    https://news.cornell.edu/stories/2014/06/news-feed-emotional-contagion-sweeps-facebook
    https://positivepsychology.com/emotional-contagion/
    Thank you for allowing us into your lives and helping us make mental health more relatable and a part of your everyday conversation! For more information or to access all episodes visit TherapistsUncut.com.
     
    What is the Therapists Uncut Podcast:
    The Therapists Uncut Podcast is a light-hearted, informative self-help podcast for grown-ups. It is hosted b

    • 19 min
    Men's Mental Health

    Men's Mental Health

     
    Our culture likes to remind us, in more way than one, that it’s expected for men to suppress their emotions and avoid being vulnerable in expressing their feelings. Alyssa Najera, LCSW, and Nikki Young, LMFT discuss the importance of men's mental health, the risks of going unacknowledged, and ways to move toward a more accepting environment for men’s emotional and mental health.
    In this episode we talk about:
    A common stereotype is that men should not be sad, hurt, anxious, depressed or emotional. They are supposed to be the breadwinners of the family, make sure everything is in order, and are often looked to (and even take upon the role of) the “fixers” of society. However, the idea that all men should uphold this image of mental stability is completely unreasonable.
    It is important to understand and consciously think about how mental illnesses can look different in men and women. In a general sense, signs of mental illness or emotional distraught (I.e., stress, anxiety, etc.) can be, but not limited to,
    Uncontrollable or increased anger and aggression Abuse of alcohol and/or drugs Increased irritability Our society tells us it is more acceptable for a man to get in a fight rather than to get emotional or cry. However, in reality, 1 in 10 men in the United States experience depression and anxiety, 1 in 6 men have experienced sexual trauma, and men are 3 to 4 times more likely to complete suicide using more lethal approaches versus women who are more likely to attempt suicide using different methods. These numbers are just from reported cases and are likely to be much higher.
    What is toxic masculinity?
    Toxic masculinity is defined as “a cultural concept of manliness that glorifies stoicism, strength, virility, and dominance, and that is socially maladaptive or harmful to mental health” by www.dictionary.com. When men's mental health gets bad, the term toxic masculinity may identify how and why they behave a certain way as a result of unresolved conflict due to past or present trauma.
    Celebrities and role models experiencing mental illness
    Many men with a celebrity status have been speaking up about their personal mental health such as
    Michael Phelps Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson Terry Bradshaw This goes to show how many people secretly suffer from depression and other mental illnesses that you may not have expected based of the way they behave or their perceived success. Mental health is individualized and can vary in intensity. Seeking professional help doesn’t mean there’s anything wrong with you, but that you are doing everything in your control to work through hard things and be the best version of yourself.
     
    Therapists Uncut Challenge:
    Think back to a time when you had a traumatic or distressing experience that was hard to talk about. Think about how it made you feel and try to process those emotions. Then, if you are ready, find someone you trust, either a family member, a close friend, a therapist, etc, and open up to them about that situation.
    Think about all of the negative stereotypes you know, have been told, or struggle with about being a man and write them down on a piece of paper. Once on that piece of paper, find a way to release those negative feelings associated with the words on the paper by destroying the paper in some way, like ripping it up for example.
     
    Resources mentioned:
    We’ve pulled together any resources mentioned in this episode and put together some links:
    Man Therapy | Men's Mental Health Resources
    Infographic: Mental Health for Men | Mental Health America (mhanational.org)
    Thank you for allowing us into your lives and helping us make mental health more relatable and a part of your everyday conversation! For more information or to access all episodes visit TherapistsUncut.com.
     
    What is the Therapists Uncut Podcast:
    The Therapists Uncut Podcast is a light-hearted, informative self-help podcast for grown-ups. It is hosted by three off-the-cloc

    • 22 min
    Living With Anxiety

    Living With Anxiety

     
    An estimated 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. experience symptoms of anxiety. Anxiety is a beast and in addition to depression, one of the most common mental health disorders in the world. Given anxiety is so prevalent, we’ve decided to dedicate episode 50 to all those LIVING WITH ANXIETY. Tune in as Nikki Young, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and Alyssa Najera, Licensed Clinical Social Worker discuss the different types of anxiety, common risk factors, and how you can deal with it.
    In this episode we talk about:
    If you have ever wondered what anxiety is, felt like you have it, been diagnosed with it, asked if you suffer from it, in denial about it, or raised by someone with anxiety, it may be helpful to better understand the different types of anxiety and how to recognize them.
    Types of Anxiety:
    What is Phobia: irrational fear or aversion to something (i.e. Fear of spiders, fear of elevators, etc.)
    What is Social anxiety: nervousness or fear being in social situations (i.e. Public speaking, fear of judgement, etc.)
    What is Generalized Anxiety disorder (GAD): anxiety provoked behavior in all types of situations and settings including home, social, work, and peer environments
    What is Substance Induced Anxiety: anxiety experienced through drugs or alcohol, possibly in attempts to self-medicate.
    What is Medical Induced Anxiety: anxiety caused by medical factors (i.e. Cancer treatment causing anxiety due to traumatic news and stability)
    What is Panic Disorders: experiencing episodes of panic and panic attacks suddenly and unexpectedly. Panic attacks consist of feeling fearful, can’t breathe, heart racing, sweating, and feeling as though you are dying
    What is Agoraphobia: an intense fear of particular places and situations. Sometimes this can look like having a fear of leaving home alone, public transportation, or crowded areas  
    What is Selective Mutism: Difficulty or failure to speak in specific environments (i.e. school, work) despite having the ability to understand and speak normally in other setting such as home
    What is Separation Anxiety Disorder: a type of anxiety in children characterized by anxiety related to the separation from parents/caregivers that is excessive for their developmental age
    What is the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)?
    The DSM is basically the bible of mental health and other disorders. It guides health and mental health professionals in appropriately diagnosing a cluster of symptoms in order to identify a treatment plan for specific diagnoses. The DSM is published by the American Psychiatric Association and has been revised several times since original debut in the 1950’s. The most recent edition is the DSM-5 How do I know if I have Anxiety?
    Common Symptoms of Anxiety Excessive worrying Feeling restless, nervous or tense Increased heart rate Rapid breathing Feeling stuck in your head about that past and future, difficult staying present Having difficulty controlling the worry Avoiding people, places, or things that may trigger anxiety Talk to you doctor to learn more about therapy for anxiety explore individual and group treatment options explore a medication assessment or referral to a psychiatrist (*Medication must be monitored under the treatment of a health professional such as primary care physician or psychiatrist and is most effective when combine with psychotherapy treatment and/or other modes of treatment) “Nobody comes out of the womb being like, okay these are the things that might go wrong, this is your engine checklist.” -Nikki Young, LMFT 00:23:00
    How do I treat Anxiety?
    Anxiety therapy is offered in the form of both individual and group therapy. There are several different  modalities used to treat anxiety when being treated by a mental health professional.
    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Anxiety: CBT is one of the most commonly used types of treatment for anxiety. CBT is a form of talk therapy that focuse

    • 36 min
    Practicing Self Awareness Part 2

    Practicing Self Awareness Part 2

     
    Brief Summary
    One of the hardest things for a person to come to terms with can be dealing with their own flaws. This week, the crew continues their conversation on self-awareness including how to recognize self-awareness, how to practice self-awareness, and learning how to trust the ongoing process of self-reflection.
     
    In this episode we talk about:
    Common ways of lacking self-awareness
    Blaming/Failing to take accountability Lack of empathy Empathy is defined as putting yourself into another person’s shoes and point of view. Excessive and unproductive arguing Inability to accept feedback  
    Ways to Improve Self-Awareness
    Practicing self-awareness can help improve communication, improve your mood, and positively impact your relationships. Nikki Young and Alyssa Najera give valuable tips on ways to practice self-awareness. To start,
    Ask yourself, “What is happening that’s causing me to react this way?” and “What do I want to learn from this?” What personality characteristics are “triggering” for you and why? Work on being vulnerable with self-acknowledgements Use therapy to help you gain perspective and set personal goals Use journaling to engage in consistent reflection Utilize Mindful practices, i.e., meditation (tune in to 49 Self-Reflection Part 1 for more) Have meaningful conversations with an honest, trustworthy friend and be open to their feedback  
     
    Therapists Uncut Challenge:
    Reflect on yourself over the past year. Allow yourself to be vulnerable and create a list of some strengths and weaknesses. Then, ask a close friend or family member to help you reflect on this list and give you feedback.
     
    Resources mentioned:
    We’ve pulled together any resources mentioned in this episode and put together some links:
    Thank you for allowing us into your lives and helping us make mental health more relatable and a part of your everyday conversation! For more information or to access all episodes visit TherapistsUncut.com.
     
    What is the Therapists Uncut Podcast:
    The Therapists Uncut Podcast is a light-hearted, informative self-help podcast for grown-ups. It is hosted by three off-the-clock therapists hoping to validate your experiences, normalize therapy and therapists, and help you prioritize your mental health.
    Who are the Therapists Uncut Podcast Co-Hosts:
    Nikki Young is co-host of Therapists Uncut and a Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist. Nikki keeps it personable and professional. Yet, she always manages to keep the Therapists Uncut family and followers laughing. You may find her squirreling through topics, stories, or jokes, and all in good fun. Don't worry because someone will bring her back around to the conversation. Nikki is a licensed marriage and family therapist in her private practice located in Modesto, CA, and she is also a Crisis Junkie at heart. In addition to being co-owner of a group private practice, she is also a crisis clinician responding to local mental health crisis and emergencies. Learn more about Nikki at catalystcounselinginc.com
    Alyssa Najera is co-host of Therapists Uncut and a Licensed Clinical Social Worker. Alyssa is typically calm and composed on most days, but often has difficulty containing her excitement about the little things in life. She loves to laugh, spread positivity, and is often caught with a smile on her face. Alyssa is also a Child Welfare Services social worker and supervisor alumni, previous child sexual abuse forensic interviewer, trainer and consultant, and CEO of a group private practice in the small town of Oakdale, CA. Learn more about Alyssa at smalltowncounselingca.com or alyssanajera.com.
    Disclaimer:
    Thank you for joining Therapists Uncut, a production of AMP Smart Business. To learn more about Therapists Uncut and stay up on upcoming episodes, please subscribe and follow us on social media. As a reminder, although the Therapists Uncut co-hosts are licensed therapists, they are not your therapist. This podcast is

    • 26 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
37 Ratings

37 Ratings

W. Mattimoe ,

Key to staying calm

Entertaining and insightful, this podcast looks beyond obvious or academic answers to share specific observations. The three therapists don’t always agree, but they do listen well and respond wisely. Their humor helps, too. I only wish my parents could have listened to this while I was growing up; they would have worried so much less!

taradactyl222 ,

Fun group and helpful info

Great co-hosts, super helpful information but still funny and makes you smile. Love that it doesn’t put me to sleep.

Mandi H ,

Very relatable

As a mental health professional I appreciate the real talk these ladies bring to the table! But the best part is you don’t have to be a mental health professional to appreciate their great insightful banter! I love the variety of real topics this podcast addresses. Highly recommend taking a listen!

Top Podcasts In Health & Fitness