28 episodes

On Translating Aging, we talk with the worldwide community of researchers, entrepreneurs, and investors who are moving longevity science from the lab to the clinic. We bring you a commanding view of the entire field, in the words of the people and companies who are moving it forward today. The podcast is sponsored by BioAge labs, a clinical-stage biotechnology company developing therapies to extend human healthspan by targeting the molecular causes of aging.

Translating Aging BioAge Labs

    • Science
    • 5.0 • 8 Ratings

On Translating Aging, we talk with the worldwide community of researchers, entrepreneurs, and investors who are moving longevity science from the lab to the clinic. We bring you a commanding view of the entire field, in the words of the people and companies who are moving it forward today. The podcast is sponsored by BioAge labs, a clinical-stage biotechnology company developing therapies to extend human healthspan by targeting the molecular causes of aging.

    Building Longevity Companies in Europe (Marc P. Bernegger)

    Building Longevity Companies in Europe (Marc P. Bernegger)

    Today’s guest on the podcast is Marc Bernegger, a serial tech entrepreneur who has been following developments in the field of longevity since 2009. Recently he became a founding partner of the Swiss company, Maximon, whose core missions is building companies and providing support to longevity entrepreneurs.
    Marc has worked for over a decade between two continents at this point, and his interest in longevity has never been more intense. From aging skin to gut microbiomes, there’s a lot of work and research left to do, and if you’re of Bernegger’s school of thought, longevity is a matter of the present, rather than some notion about the distant future. As you will hear today, Marc is like so many others in his field - putting in the work now to create a better tomorrow.
    The Finer Details of This Episode:
    Entrepreneurial support
    Maintaining a growing company
    The future of aging skin
    Cooperation in the longevity biotech sector
    Investment attitudes in the US and Europe
    Seeing longevity as a present issue

    Quotes:
    “Our ambition is to only focus on businesses where there's a real scientific background, so not selling snake oil, which is maybe on the short term very profitable but definitely not sustainable.”
    “We support them from day one. We help them with all our network experiences and learnings as serial entrepreneurs ourselves. We support them with money. And we really try to be a sparring partner without maybe becoming too annoying.”
    “​​I think for me as an entrepreneur, that's always very fulfilling that you can give, be an alternative, and create more entrepreneurs starting companies.”
    “One of the reasons we decided to launch Maximon as a company builder is that we wanted to show that it’s possible to monetize the megatrend of longevity as we speak.”
    “You can really boost and accelerate the growth by combining some of the different business models.”
    “By having more elderly, healthy, longer living people, a lot of business models will change. So elderly living is a big topic. Something we're looking into is the whole gut microbiome, but also microbiome in other areas where you have a huge impact on longevity.”
    “The longevity biotech sector, even in the regulated drugs space, is pretty cooperative. We don't think of ourselves as competitors, because everyone wants everyone else to succeed.”


    Links:
    Email questions, comments, and feedback to podcast@bioagelabs.com
    Translating Aging on Twitter:https://twitter.com/BioAgePodcast ( @bioagepodcast)
    BIOAGE Labs Websitehttps://bioagelabs.com/ ( BIOAGELabs.com)
    BIOAGE Labs Twitterhttps://twitter.com/bioagelabs?lang=en ( @bioagelabs)
    BIOAGE Labshttps://www.linkedin.com/company/bioage-labs/ ( LinkedIn)


    https://www.maximon.com/ (Maximon Homepage)

    • 22 min
    Defining and Measuring the Aging Process (Dr. Vadim Gladyshev)

    Defining and Measuring the Aging Process (Dr. Vadim Gladyshev)

    Joining Chris today is Dr. Vadim Gladyshev, Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Director of Redox Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. The Gladyshev lab studies redox biology and trace elements as they relate to cancer, reproduction, and aging. Today, Dr. Gladyshev shares with us how his research group investigates the aging process and how aging is quantified in academic research.
    Dr. Gladyshev begins by discussing how he got involved in the longevity sector. He goes on to explain that aging has not been clearly defined, and how many researchers define aging differently. He contends that aging should be studied as opposed to age-related diseases because age-related diseases are influenced by other factors aside from aging. The interview concludes with the importance of conferences that address the science of longevity and how these events connect bright minds to tackle unsolved problems in the field.
    Episode Highlights:
    How Dr. Gladyshev got involved in aging
    The relationship between selenium and longevity
    How longevity is studied in the Gladyshev lab
    What is rejuvenation?
    The importance of measuring the aging process using clocks
    Using experimental and computational methods to alter clocks
    How the biotech industry quantifies aging
    Targeting aging and not age-related diseases
    The importance of conferences targeting longevity

    Quotes:
    “In general we try to address fundamental questions in the biology of aging — really trying to understand, ‘What is aging? How can we fundamentally adjust lifespan or target aging?’ … And we try to identify new areas of potential growth for the field.”
    “We work on cross-species analysis to understand how the lifespan is shaped over evolutionary timescales and how we can utilize what we learn from evolution in targeting aging and lifespan.”
    “Many changes can be measured as an organism moves from young to old. So this might be useful for measuring the progress of normal aging. But when you're intervening in aging, you don't want to reverse all of those changes, because some of those changes are evidence of the body's protective responses in action.”
    “Just to play devil's advocate for a second: why would you want to target aging if you still got sick and died at the same rate?”
    “Mortality is an integrative feature of not just the aging process, but interaction with the environment.”
    Links:
    Email questions, comments, and feedback to podcast@bioagelabs.com
    Translating Aging on Twitter:https://twitter.com/BioAgePodcast ( @bioagepodcast)
    BIOAGE Labs Websitehttps://bioagelabs.com/ ( BIOAGELabs.com)
    BIOAGE Labs Twitterhttps://twitter.com/bioagelabs?lang=en ( @bioagelabs)
    BIOAGE Labshttps://www.linkedin.com/company/bioage-labs/ ( LinkedIn)


    https://www.linkedin.com/in/vadim-gladyshev-82268b153/ (Dr. Vadim’s Linkedin)
    https://gladyshevlab.bwh.harvard.edu/ (Gladyshev lab Website)
    https://mobile.twitter.com/gladyshev_lab (Gladyshev lab Twitter)

    • 31 min
    AI and Robotics in Longevity Biotech (Alex Zhavoronkov)

    AI and Robotics in Longevity Biotech (Alex Zhavoronkov)

    Joining Chris today is Alex Zhavoronkov, CEO and Co-founder of Insilico Medicine, an artificial intelligence–driven pharma-technology company with a mission to accelerate drug discovery and development. Alex is a lifelong advocate for longevity biotech and the author of The Ageless Generation: How Advances in Biomedicine Will Transform the Global Economy. Today, Alex shares the accomplishments that Insilico Medicine has achieved in drug discovery and how AI and robotics come into play.
    The episode begins with Alex narrating his experience in the field of longevity and how his interest developed at a young age. He discusses the reason behind building Insilico Medicine, how AI and robotics aid drug discovery in the longevity industry, and how biology and chemistry play a significant role at Insilico Medicine. The episode ends with Alex describing the future he sees for Insilico Medicine and how they can improve human life using AI to advance drug discovery and data generation.
    Episode Highlights:
    What fueled Alex’s interest in longevity
    Building Insilico Medicine
    How tech is used at Insilico Medicine
    The role of AI and robotic systems
    How AI and robotic systems can improve the longevity space
    The future of Insilico Medicine

    Quotes:
    “It always fascinated me how we grow, mature, reach our peak, and then decline and die. At the end of the day, it doesn't matter what you do, you lose everything… So, the rest of my life is dedicated to aging research.”
    “We started generating novel molecular structures with the desired properties, and managed to achieve spectacular results.”
    “In human clinical trials, we realized that we can use some incremental data that could be generated using a robotic system. So now we're building one of the most advanced labs in the world focused on data generation, and also personalized medicine that can take in specific biological samples.”
    “BioAge is one of the leaders in the space, showcasing that it can identify targets using longitudinal data that is available from biobanks.”
    “We trained neural networks to predict age first, and then retrain them on diseases or on other conditions, that is, any data type that is changing in time.”
    “By training on age, you are training on the most important feature that connects all of us.”
    Links:
    Email questions, comments, and feedback to podcast@bioagelabs.com
    Translating Aging on Twitter:https://twitter.com/BioAgePodcast ( @bioagepodcast)
    BIOAGE Labs Websitehttps://bioagelabs.com/ ( BIOAGELabs.com)
    BIOAGE Labs Twitterhttps://twitter.com/bioagelabs?lang=en ( @bioagelabs)
    BIOAGE Labshttps://www.linkedin.com/company/bioage-labs/ ( LinkedIn)
    https://insilico.com/ (Insilico Medicine)

    • 24 min
    The Impact of Muscle Aging on Longevity (Dr. Bill Evans)

    The Impact of Muscle Aging on Longevity (Dr. Bill Evans)

    Back in the host's chair this week, Bob Hughes welcomes Dr. Bill Evans, one of the world's foremost experts on muscle aging, to the podcast. Bill is adjunct professor of Human Nutrition at University of California Berkeley and an adjunct professor of medicine in the Geriatrics Program at Duke. Previously, he was vice president and head of Muscle Metabolism Discovery Performance Unit at GlaxoSmithKline and he was also president of the Muscle and Health Division at KineMed. He was also president of the Muscle and Health Division at KineMed. Earlier this year, he was recognized with a Lifetime Achievement Award at the 2022 International Conference on Frailty, and Sarcopenia Research. Today, Bill brings his vast amount of experience and expertise to the podcast to discuss how muscle aging affects longevity in older people and the relationship between muscle aging and age-related diseases.
    He begins by sharing his experience in the longevity industry, particularly with muscle aging, and goes on to discuss the term ‘sarcopenia’, including what it means and how it relates to muscle degeneration. He then explains the differences between sarcopenia and cachexia, and referring to several studies, shares the meaning of frailty, the relation of walking speed with age, and the importance of the brain–muscle connection. At the conclusion of the episode, Bill discusses the future of muscle aging and how the longevity industry hopes to find solutions that will improve the lives of people on a global scale.
    Episode Highlights:
    Bill’s journey in the muscle aging industry
    Why muscle degeneration?
    The origin of the term ‘sarcopenia’
    The differences between sarcopenia and cachexia
    Is sarcopenia due to dysregulation of neuronal inputs?
    The contribution of fast-twitch and slow-twitch muscle fibers in aging
    Sarcopenia and age-related diseases
    What is frailty?
    Why our walking speed slows down as we age
    The relation between exercise and psychological state
    The brain-muscle connection
    The future of the longevity industry from Bill’s viewpoint

    Quotes:
    “What are some of the causes of late life disability? How does muscle change as we grow older? Why do we lose muscle?”
    “A large percentage of women in particular over the age of 60 reported that they couldn't even lift 10 pounds. And the muscle weakness progressed as they grew older.”
    “The primary deficit and functional deficit as we grow older is loss of strength. And that is directly related to how much muscle we have.”
    “Cachexia is associated with a rapid increase in the breakdown of muscle, while sarcopenia is associated with a more gradual decrease in the rate of synthesis of muscle.”
    “People generally over the age of 75, have circulating markers of inflammation.”
    “People with type two diabetes and insulin resistance lose muscle at almost double the rate of people with normal glucose tolerance.”
    “If we improve strength in an older person, their spontaneous activity goes up. And their habitual walking speed goes up as well.”
    Links:
    Email questions, comments, and feedback to podcast@bioagelabs.com
    Translating Aging on Twitter:https://twitter.com/BioAgePodcast ( @bioagepodcast)
    BIOAGE Labs Websitehttps://bioagelabs.com/ ( BIOAGELabs.com)
    BIOAGE Labs Twitterhttps://twitter.com/bioagelabs?lang=en ( @bioagelabs)
    BIOAGE Labshttps://www.linkedin.com/company/bioage-labs/ ( LinkedIn)
    https://www.linkedin.com/in/william-evans-phd-94a58415/ (Dr. Bill Evans on LinkedIn)

    • 43 min
    Eliminating Senescent Cells by Activating the Immune System (Robin Mansukhani, Deciduous Therapeutics)

    Eliminating Senescent Cells by Activating the Immune System (Robin Mansukhani, Deciduous Therapeutics)

    This week’s episode of Translating Aging features Robin Mansukhani, CEO and Co-founder of Deciduous Therapeutics, a company that aims to positively impact human healthspan by developing medicines which activate the endogenous immune mechanism responsible for the elimination of senescent cells. Today, Robin shares his insights on how senescent cells develop and how Deciduous Therapeutics eliminates them.
    Robin begins by explaining what causes the growth of senescent cells. He explains that not all senescent cells are dangerous and discusses the various kinds of these cells. Although senescent cells are prominent in age-related diseases, Robin explains that they are also found in younger people with autoimmune diseases such as juvenile diabetes. He goes on to talk about Deciduous Therapeutics’ approach in combating senescent cells by activating the NKT cells. He also shares his thinking about the best directions for human trials. The episode concludes with Robin describing the future of Deciduous Therapeutics, and his focus on impacting people globally in a meaningful way.
    In this episode, you’ll learn how senescence arises, traditional senolytic approaches, and the importance of NKT cells in eliminating these pathogenic celss.
    Episode Highlights:
    The origin of senescent cells

    Why are senescent cells highly pathogenic?

    Breaking down the different kinds of senescent cells

    The relationship between senescent cells and age-related diseases

    Senolytics and senostatics: approaches for getting rid of senescent cells

    Deciduous Therapeutics’ approach

    What happens when senescent cells overpower NKT cells?

    The role alpha-galactosyl ceramide on NKT cells

    The current hurdles Deciduous Therapeutics are trying to overcome

    How Robin see Deciduous Therapeutics in five years

    Quotes:
    “Senescent cells are cells that have been irreversibly damaged, and so they exit the cell cycle.”
    “It's not about the age of the person. It's more about the biological age of the organ and tissue. So we see senescence, also, in young people.”
    “If you can take a senescent cell that's pathogenic and make it good again, and make it functional again safely and successfully, that would be very useful.”
    “The approach here and our mindset going into creating this company was: there's a way that nature intended for this to happen, and it is our job to figure that out.”
    “Getting the first indication to work means that you'll have a runway to lots of success. But if your first one does not work, in a lot of cases, it might mean the end of the company or the end of the runway because you simply don't get enough funding for multiple clinical trials at once. So it is critical.”
    Links:
    Email questions, comments, and feedback to podcast@bioagelabs.com
    Translating Aging on Twitter:https://twitter.com/BioAgePodcast ( @bioagepodcast)
    BIOAGE Labs Websitehttps://bioagelabs.com/ ( BIOAGELabs.com)
    BIOAGE Labs Twitterhttps://twitter.com/bioagelabs?lang=en ( @bioagelabs)
    BIOAGE Labshttps://www.linkedin.com/company/bioage-labs/ ( LinkedIn)
    Deciduous Therapeutics Websitehttps://www.deciduoustx.com/ ( DeciduousTx.com)

    • 43 min
    Bringing Talent into the Longevity Industry’s Workforce (Mark Hamalainen)

    Bringing Talent into the Longevity Industry’s Workforce (Mark Hamalainen)

    In today’s episode of Translating Aging, Chris welcomes Mark Hamalainen, the founder and director of LessDeath, to discuss how to encourage the influx of talents into the longevity field. LessDeath is an organization on a mission to support the growth and effectiveness of the longevity industry’s workforce. Today, Mark shares with us his experience in the longevity space, why he founded LessDeath, and what to expect at the upcoming LessDeath Longevity Summer Camp.
    Noting that his experience in the longevity space was propelled by his fascination as a teenager, Mark goes on to share details about leaving his Ph.D. program to get hands-on experience in the longevity world and discover the many talents represented in the industry. He speaks about founding LessDeath, what the organization hopes to achieve, the inaugural LessDeath Longevity Summer Camp and the gap this event is hoping to bridge in the industry. Included in this episode are interviews with Stephanie Dainow and Kia Winslow, camp counselors for the Longevity Summer Camp, in which they share the kinds of talent they expect to attract to the event and the kinds of activities that will take place.
    Episode Highlights:
    How Mark got involved in the longevity space
    The biggest issue in the longevity field
    The different talents prospering in the biotech field
    Why gene delivery and gene therapy require more technological development
    The challenges with getting people into the longevity biotech field
    How LessDeath tackles the talent issue and encourages networking
    The LessDeath Longevity Summer Camp
    Interview with Stephanie Dainow
    How Stephanie got into the longevity space
    Interview with Kia Winslow
    Kia’s story of getting into biotech
    What is next for LessDeath?

    Quotes:
    “I started a Ph.D. at Cambridge working on some gene therapy development. But I quickly got a bit disillusioned with the pace and the amount of extra work involved in grant writing, bureaucracy, and academia.”
    “A lot of people would prefer to work on important problems like longevity, climate change, building a multiplanetary species. But it can be difficult to know where to start, and how to build a sustainable career out of it.”
    “I've never liked the idea of getting older and losing my faculties and physical capabilities.”
    “If you want to invest your time supporting initiatives that drive measurable improvement to the human condition, but you're really not sure where to start, this is the event for you.”
    Links:
    Email questions, comments, and feedback to podcast@bioagelabs.com
    Translating Aging on Twitter:https://twitter.com/BioAgePodcast ( @bioagepodcast)
    BIOAGE Labs Websitehttps://bioagelabs.com/ ( BIOAGELabs.com)
    BIOAGE Labs Twitterhttps://twitter.com/bioagelabs?lang=en ( @bioagelabs)
    BIOAGE Labshttps://www.linkedin.com/company/bioage-labs/ ( LinkedIn)
    LessDeath Websitehttps://www.lessdeath.org/ ( LessDeath.Org)
    Apply for LessDeathhttps://www.lessdeath.org/apply ( Longevity Summer Camp)
    Mark’shttps://www.linkedin.com/in/mark-hamalainen-410ba650/ ( LinkedIn)

    • 34 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
8 Ratings

8 Ratings

Mycophage ,

Finally, a podcast about on longevity science!

I’ve been waiting for a podcast like this one for a long time - a show that reaches out to the people involved in what I think is the most exciting science news story of the 21st century. Looking forward to seeing what they come up with in future episodes!

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