17 episodes

Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (ARD) is an international peer-reviewed journal committed to promoting the highest standards of scientific exchange and education. It covers all aspects of rheumatology, which includes the spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions, arthritic disease, and connective tissue disorders. ARD publishes basic, clinical, and translational scientific research. Concise scientific communication is encouraged and peer-reviewed proceedings of international meetings are featured. ARD is the official journal of EULAR. * The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. The content of this podcast does not constitute medical advice and it is not intended to function as a substitute for a healthcare practitioner’s judgement, patient care or treatment. The views expressed by contributors are those of the speakers. BMJ does not endorse any views or recommendations discussed or expressed on this podcast. Listeners should also be aware that professionals in the field may have different opinions. By listening to this podcast, listeners agree not to use its content as the basis for their own medical treatment or for the medical treatment of others.

ARD podcast BMJ Group

    • Science
    • 5.0, 1 Rating

Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (ARD) is an international peer-reviewed journal committed to promoting the highest standards of scientific exchange and education. It covers all aspects of rheumatology, which includes the spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions, arthritic disease, and connective tissue disorders. ARD publishes basic, clinical, and translational scientific research. Concise scientific communication is encouraged and peer-reviewed proceedings of international meetings are featured. ARD is the official journal of EULAR. * The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. The content of this podcast does not constitute medical advice and it is not intended to function as a substitute for a healthcare practitioner’s judgement, patient care or treatment. The views expressed by contributors are those of the speakers. BMJ does not endorse any views or recommendations discussed or expressed on this podcast. Listeners should also be aware that professionals in the field may have different opinions. By listening to this podcast, listeners agree not to use its content as the basis for their own medical treatment or for the medical treatment of others.

    The dose dependent effect of statins on osteoporosis

    The dose dependent effect of statins on osteoporosis

    Statins are some of the most commonly prescribed cholesterol-lowering drugs. They act by inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase, the main enzyme in the synthesis of cholesterol. Earlier studies have shown that statins have an osteoprotective effect: a recently published paper has shown that there is a dose-dependent relationship between different kinds of statins with diagnosis of osteoporosis. "We could find an underrepresentation of osteoporosis in low-dose and an overrepresentation in high-dose statin treatment," says first author Dr. Michael Leutner, MSc PhD (Department of Internal Medicine 3, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Medical University of Vienna), who discusses the details of his study with Dr. Paul Studenic in this podcast.
    Read the paper: https://ard.bmj.com/content/78/12/1706

    • 12 min
    A prediction score for individuals at risk to develop rheumatoid arthritis

    A prediction score for individuals at risk to develop rheumatoid arthritis

    In this podcast recorded at the ACR meeting 2019, Dr. Caroline Ospelt speaks to Prof. Anca Catrina and Dr. Aase Hensvold both of the Division of Rheumatology at the Department of Medicine located at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm Sweden.
    Hensvold et al. developed a prediction score by combining several clinical and blood-based markers that could be useful in predicting which patients with auto-antibodies and musculoskeletal symptoms develop ultrasound-detectable arthritis. These are the first results of an ongoing study on individuals at-risk for rheumatoid arthritis.

    • 12 min
    Prediction of radiographic progression using synovitis characteristics

    Prediction of radiographic progression using synovitis characteristics

    Dr. Felice Rivellese from the Center of Experimental Medicine and Rheumatology at the Queen Mary University in London discusses the results of his presentation at the ACR 2019 with Dr. Caroline Ospelt. In a subanalysis of the pathobiology of the Early Arthitis Cohort (PEAC), Rivellese at al could show that B cell-rich synovitis is associated with disease severity and radiographic progression, in particular, if B cell infiltrates persist after cDMARD treatment.

    • 10 min
    Six-week treatment with low-dose prednisolone in patients with painful hand osteoarthritis

    Six-week treatment with low-dose prednisolone in patients with painful hand osteoarthritis

    This randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial by Kroon et al has demonstrated a substantial improvement in painful hand OA with signs of inflammation following six weeks of low-dose prednisolone.

    • 3 min
    Highlights from ACR: guselkumab, ixekizumab and secukinumab in SpA

    Highlights from ACR: guselkumab, ixekizumab and secukinumab in SpA

    Atul Deodhar, from the Oregon Health & Science University, provides an overview of recent clinical trial results in the area of seronegative Spondylarthritis. He presented the 24-week data of Guselkumab in active psoriatic arthritis patients in the DISCOVER-1 study and compared the phase 3 trials in non-radiographic SpA patients on Ixekizumab (COAST-X) and Secukinumab (PREVENT) with up to 52 week data available.

    • 14 min
    TULIP 2: Efficacy and Safety of Anifrolumab in Patients

    TULIP 2: Efficacy and Safety of Anifrolumab in Patients

    TULIP 2: Efficacy and Safety of Anifrolumab in Patients with Moderate to Severe Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Results of the Second Phase 3 Randomized Controlled Trial.

    In this second phase 3 trial, the primary endpoint, BICLA, was achieved, and anifrolumab was superior to placebo for multiple secondary efficacy endpoints, including SRI(4), skin disease, and oral corticosteroid tapering.

    • 3 min

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