173 episodes

Cancer.Net Podcast features trusted, timely, and compassionate information for people with cancer, survivors, their families, and loved ones. Expert tips on coping with cancer, recaps of the latest research advances, and thoughtful discussions on cancer care

Cancer.Net Podcast American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.8 • 9 Ratings

Cancer.Net Podcast features trusted, timely, and compassionate information for people with cancer, survivors, their families, and loved ones. Expert tips on coping with cancer, recaps of the latest research advances, and thoughtful discussions on cancer care

    Understanding the Role of Chaplains in Cancer Care, with Jane Jeuland, MDiv

    Understanding the Role of Chaplains in Cancer Care, with Jane Jeuland, MDiv

    ASCO: You’re listening to a podcast from Cancer.Net. This cancer information website is produced by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, known as ASCO, the voice of the world's oncology professionals.
    The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guests’ statements on this podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. Cancer research discussed in this podcast is ongoing, so data described here may change as research progresses.
    In this podcast, the Reverend Jane Jeuland discusses what people with cancer should know about the role of chaplains in cancer care, including how chaplains are trained, the type of support they can provide for people with cancer and their family members and caregivers, and how someone with cancer can ask for spiritual support from their health care team.
    Ms. Jeuland received her Masters of Divinity from Yale Divinity School. She is an ordained Episcopal priest. She received her chaplaincy training from Yale New Haven Hospital and is a board-certified chaplain. She has served as an oncology chaplain and was the first palliative care chaplain at Yale New Haven Hospital. She has no relevant relationships to disclose. 
    Jane Jeuland: Hi, my name is Jane Jeuland, and I am the palliative care clinic chaplain at Yale New Haven Hospital. I'm here today to talk a little bit about what I do at Yale New Haven Hospital, and also, what is a chaplain? What is it that we offer and provide? How are we trained? And some other questions that people have for us as chaplains.
    So I'll start by just describing a little bit about what I do at Yale New Haven Hospital in my role. In addition to seeing patients in our clinic, I visit with patients one-on-one through video platforms, phone, and I also visit with patients in person for scheduled appointments. And in those appointments, we get to know each other, we build a rapport and a relationship. And I help people process how they make meaning, find purpose and belonging in their lives, and how that is impacting their cancer care, but also how their cancer is really impacting their meaning, purpose, and belonging. In addition to those individual meetings, I also visit with patients in group settings. I host several groups over Zoom where patients get to talk to one another and share deeply and support each other.
    And last but certainly not least, I also have started a podcast with my patients called In the Midst of It All, which you can find on Apple Podcasts and Spotify. And in that podcast, patients share their stories that they've written about their lives, about their cancer journey, and about their spirituality, and how that has helped them through all that they're going through.
    So, how do chaplains get trained? I think this is one thing that people ask me quite a bit. What is your training like? Our training is pretty extensive. We need to have a 3-year Master's degree, typically a degree of divinity. And then after that, we have a year of training called Clinical Pastoral Education, CPE for short. And in that year of training, we are with a cohort of about 4 to 5 other chaplains in training. And we are supervised by a highly trained supervisor as well who has quite an extensive and long process to get certified to do that. And what our supervisors do is they help us really go out, visit with patients, and then reflect on those visits. We do things called “verbatims.”
    So what is a verbatim? When we write up a verbatim, we're writing up word for word an interaction that we have with a patient. And obviously, we will keep the patient confidential. But we do this with our group and with our supervisor to

    • 23 min
    Returning to Work After Cancer Treatment, with Fay Hlubocky, PhD, MA, FASCO, and Shelly Rosenfeld, Esq.

    Returning to Work After Cancer Treatment, with Fay Hlubocky, PhD, MA, FASCO, and Shelly Rosenfeld, Esq.

    ASCO: You’re listening to a podcast from Cancer.Net (Cancer dot Net). This cancer information website is produced by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, known as ASCO, the voice of the world's oncology professionals.
    The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guests’ statements on this podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. Cancer research discussed in this podcast is ongoing, so data described here may change as research progresses.
    In this podcast, Dr. Fay Hlubocky  and Shelly Rosenfeld discuss what people should know about returning to work after cancer treatment. This podcast is intended for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal or medical advice. 
    Dr. Hlubocky is a licensed clinical health psychologist with an expertise in psychosocial oncology and a health care ethicist at the University of Chicago. She's also the Cancer.Net Associate Editor for Psychosocial Oncology.
    Ms. Rosenfeld is the director of the Disability Rights Legal Center’s Cancer Legal Resource Center, which provides free information and resources about cancer-related issues. 
    View disclosures for Dr. Hlubocky and Ms. Rosenfeld at Cancer.Net.
    Claire Smith: Hi, everyone. I'm Claire Smith, a member of the Cancer.Net team, and I'll be your host for today's Cancer.Net podcast. Cancer.Net is the patient education website of ASCO, the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Today, we'll be talking about what people with cancer should know about returning to work after treatment, including information about the legal protections available to people with cancer in the United States. Our guests today are Dr. Fay Hlubocky and Ms. Shelly Rosenfeld. Dr. Hlubocky is a licensed clinical health psychologist with an expertise in psychosocial oncology and a health care ethicist at the University of Chicago. She's also the Cancer.Net Associate Editor for Psychosocial Oncology. Thanks for joining us today, Dr. Hlubocky.
    Dr. Fay Hlubocky: Thank you, Claire. It's such an honor and a privilege to be with you and Shelly today.
    Claire Smith: Wonderful. Our next guest, Ms. Rosenfeld, is the director of Disability Rights Legal Center's Cancer Legal Resource Center, which provides free information and resources about cancer-related legal issues to members of the cancer community across the U.S. Thanks so much for being here, Ms. Rosenfeld.
    Shelly Rosenfeld: Thank you. I'm honored and grateful to be here today.
    Claire Smith: Before we begin, I should mention that Dr. Hlubocky and Ms. Rosenfeld do not have any relationships to disclose related to this podcast, and you can find their full disclosures on Cancer.Net. So, to start, Dr. Hlubocky, can you talk a little bit about some of the ways that people might think about work differently after an experience like cancer?
    Dr. Fay Hlubocky: Thank you, Claire. That's such an important question to start today's talk with. For many, the thoughts and decision-making surrounding returning to work can be very complex. Perspectives on if, how, and when to return to work will differ from person to person. Although one may feel quite motivated and even inspired to return to work after the cancer experience, the idea to return to work immediately after this post-cancer journey phase may simply seem overwhelming and bring about anxious and worrying thoughts. Thoughts and questions such as, "Am I ready to return to work after all I've been through?" or "Can I do the job like I did before?" are common and expected.
    For some who may experience financial burdens, these individuals feel compelled to return to work with thoughts of, "I have to get back t

    • 27 min
    2023 News and Research in Prostate, Bladder, Kidney, and Testicular Cancer

    2023 News and Research in Prostate, Bladder, Kidney, and Testicular Cancer

    You’re listening to a podcast from Cancer.Net. This cancer information website is produced by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, known as ASCO, the voice of the world's oncology professionals.
    The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guests’ statements on this podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. Cancer research discussed in this podcast is ongoing, so data described here may change as research progresses.
    In this podcast, members of the Cancer.Net Editorial Board discuss the latest research, innovations, and discussions taking place across the field of genitourinary cancers, including prostate cancer, bladder cancer, kidney cancer, and testicular cancer.
    This podcast is led by Cancer.Net Associate Editor for Genitourinary Cancers, Dr. Petros Grivas. Dr. Grivas is the clinical director of the Genitourinary Cancers Program at University of Washington Medicine and a professor in the clinical research division at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. He is joined by Dr. Neeraj Agarwal, Dr. Shilpa Gupta, Dr. Tian Zhang, and Dr. Timothy Gilligan.
    Dr. Agarwal is a Professor of Medicine, and a Presidential Endowed Chair of Cancer Research at the Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah. He directs the Genitourinary Oncology Program and Center of Investigational Therapeutics at the Huntsman Cancer Institute. He is also the Cancer.Net Specialty Editor for Prostate Cancer.
    Dr. Gupta is the Director of the Genitourinary Medical Oncology Program at Taussig Cancer Institute and Co-Leader of the Genitourinary Oncology Program at Cleveland Clinic. She is also the Cancer.Net Specialty Editor for Bladder Cancer.
    Dr. Zhang is an Associate Professor of Internal Medicine at UT Southwestern Medical Center and a medical oncologist at the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center. She is also the Cancer.Net Specialty Editor for Kidney Cancer.
    Dr. Gilligan is a Medical Oncologist, Associate Professor of Medicine, and Vice-Chair for Education at the Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute. He is also the Cancer.Net Specialty Editor for Testicular Cancer.
     View full disclosures for Dr. Grivas, Dr. Agarwal, Dr. Gupta, Dr. Zhang, and Dr. Gilligan at Cancer.Net.
    Dr. Grivas: Hello. I'm Dr. Petros Grivas. I'm a medical oncologist in Seattle, a professor at the University of Washington and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center. I'm really excited and thrilled today to host wonderful superstars in the field of GU Medical Oncology who will share insights about the highlights of kidney cancer, prostate cancer, and bladder, urothelial, urinary tract cancers that happened in 2023. And this highlight aims to inform our great audience about what are the clinically relevant insights, what patients should be aware, what patients should ask for when they go to the clinic, or overall, how they can be most well-informed and have the necessary tools to improve their care and feel well-supported in regards to education. So without further ado, we're going to cover in first prostate cancer, a very important update in this year. So all the people out there that are interested in hearing about prostate cancer will find this very, very useful and insightful. I'm very excited to host Professor, Dr. Neeraj Agarwal from University of Utah. Neeraj, do you want to introduce yourself?
    Dr. Agarwal: Of course. It's such an honor to be here. My name is Dr. Neeraj Agarwal. I'm a professor of medicine and director of genitourinary oncology program at the University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Institute.
    Dr. Grivas: Neeraj, thank you so much for accepting the invitation and being with us. I wo

    • 42 min
    Advanced Cancer Care Planning, with Richard T. Lee, MD, FASCO, Tara Sanft, MD, and Biren Saraiya, MD

    Advanced Cancer Care Planning, with Richard T. Lee, MD, FASCO, Tara Sanft, MD, and Biren Saraiya, MD

    ASCO: You’re listening to a podcast from Cancer.Net. This cancer information website is produced by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, known as ASCO, the voice of the world's oncology professionals.
    The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guests’ statements on this podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. Cancer research discussed in this podcast is ongoing, so data described here may change as research progresses.
    In this Meaningful Conversations podcast, Dr. Richard Lee talks to Dr. Tara Sanft and Dr. Biren Saraiya about what people with advanced cancer should know, including the value of palliative and supportive care and ways to talk with their families and healthcare teams about their health care wishes.
    Meaningful Conversations is a Cancer.Net blog and podcast series that describes the important discussions people may need to have with their providers, caregivers, and loved ones during cancer and offers ways to help navigate these conversations.
    Dr. Lee is a Clinical Professor in the Departments of Supportive Care Medicine and Medical Oncology at City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center and serves as the Medical Director of the Integrative Medicine Program. He is also the 2023 Cancer.Net Associate Editor for Palliative Care.
    Dr. Sanft is a medical oncologist and Chief Patient Experience Officer at Smilow Cancer Hospital, the Medical Director of the Yale Survivorship Clinic, and Associate Professor of Medicine in Medical Oncology at Yale School of Medicine.
    Dr. Saraiya is a medical oncologist at Rutgers Cancer Institute and Associate Professor of Medicine in the Division of Medical Oncology, Solid Tumor Section at the Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.
    Both Dr. Sanft and Dr. Biren are members of the 2023 Cancer.Net Advisory Panel for Palliative and Supportive Care.
    View disclosures for Dr. Lee, Dr. Sanft, and Dr. Saraiya at Cancer.Net.
    Dr. Lee: Hi, my name is Richard Lee. I'm a clinical professor here at City of Hope and also the Cherng Family Director's Chair for the Center for Integrative Oncology. I'm really happy to be here today and talking about the topic of advanced care planning. And I'll have Dr. Tara Sanft and also Dr. Biren Saraiya introduce themselves as well.
    Dr. Sanft: Thanks, Dr. Lee. I'm Tara Sanft. I'm a breast medical oncologist at Yale Cancer Center and Smilow Cancer Hospital in New Haven, Connecticut. I am board certified in medical oncology and hospice and palliative medicine. I do direct the survivorship clinic, which is an appropriate place for advanced care planning that we can touch on today. I'm really happy to be here.
    Dr. Saraiya: Hi, my name is Biren Saraiya. I'm a medical oncologist focused on GU medical oncology and also a board-certified palliative care physician. I'm at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey. My focus is on decision-making. My research interest in decision-making and end-of-life planning for patients with serious medical illnesses. And I do a lot of teaching on this topic at our medical school. And I'm also glad to be here, and I do not have any relevant financial disclosures.
    Dr. Lee: Thank you so much for both of you for being here. I should also add, I don't have any relevant financial or disclosures, conflicts of interest.
    Dr. Sanft: Thank you. I'd like to add that I do not either. Thanks for the reminder.
    Dr. Lee: Yes. Thank you both. And so this is a really important topic that we deal with when we see patients, especially those with more advanced cancer. Could you talk about when we say advanced cancer, what does that really mean?
    Dr. Saraiya: When I think of advanced cance

    • 28 min
    What is the TAPUR (Targeted Agent and Profiling Utilization Registry) Study, with Richard Schilsky, MD, FACP, FASCO

    What is the TAPUR (Targeted Agent and Profiling Utilization Registry) Study, with Richard Schilsky, MD, FACP, FASCO

    ASCO: You’re listening to a podcast from Cancer.Net. This cancer information website is produced by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, known as ASCO, the voice of the world's oncology professionals.
    The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guests’ statements on this podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. Cancer research discussed in this podcast is ongoing, so data described here may change as research progresses.
    ASCO’s first clinical trial is the Targeted Agent and Profiling Utilization Registry, or TAPUR Study. This clinical trial is intended for people with advanced cancer without other treatment options available, and whose cancer has at least one genomic variation that can be targeted with specific drugs.
    In this podcast, Dr. Richard Schilsky discusses the TAPUR study and explains why it is significant. He also discusses what participants can expect. Dr. Schilsky is the Principal Investigator for the TAPUR study. He is also the former Chief Medical Officer for ASCO and Professor Emeritus at University of Chicago.
    View Dr. Schilsky’s disclosures at Cancer.Net.
    Dr. Schilsky: Hi, everyone. My name is Richard Schilsky and I'm the principal investigator of the ASCO TAPUR Study and the former Chief Medical Officer of ASCO. I'm happy to give you an overview and update about the study today. By the way, TAPUR is an acronym that stands for Targeted Agent and Profiling Utilization Registry. Hopefully, the reason for naming it that will become clear as you listen. The TAPUR study was conceived in 2013 and launched in 2016, and was based on the observation that there was a rapid increase in testing the tumors of patients with advanced cancer for gene mutations that might be contributing to the growth of the tumor, so-called genomic profiling, in the hope of finding a genomic alteration that could potentially be treated by a drug that was already FDA-approved for a different tumor type than what the patient had.
    Meaning, in order for the patient to receive the drug, it would have to be prescribed off-label. The challenge with prescribing the off-label use of a drug is that most insurance plans don't cover the cost of treatment. Additionally, even if the patient were able to receive the drug, there was no mechanism for the oncology community to learn from the patient's treatment experience.
    The TAPUR study has managed to address these challenges by providing access to FDA-approved drugs at no cost to the patient and providing treatment results to the oncology community regarding the effects of off-label use of the treatments being studied. Now, TAPUR is a clinical trial, and its primary objective is to describe the anti-tumor activity and toxicity of commercially available targeted anti-cancer drugs prescribed for treatment of patients whose tumors have a genomic alteration known to be a drug target or to predict sensitivity to a drug.
    TAPUR was designed to be simple for providers and patients. It's a phase 2 study, meaning that we're aiming to learn about efficacy and safety. It’s prospective, that is, it enrolls patients going forward. It is not randomized. Everybody gets a treatment based on the genomic profile of their tumor and the available treatments in the study. It's a multi-basket study. That is to say, multiple therapies are available on the study that are targeting multiple genomic alterations. And it's a pragmatic study. TAPUR attempts to replicate routine clinical care. It's exempt from FDA oversight. It provides oral drugs that can be shipped directly to the patient's home after the first visit.
    Now, as I said, the TAPUR study was launc

    • 11 min
    Treatment Options Before and After Surgery for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Treatment Options Before and After Surgery for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ASCO: You’re listening to a podcast from Cancer.Net. This cancer information website is produced by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, known as ASCO, the voice of the world's oncology professionals. 
    The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guests’ statements on this podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. Cancer research discussed in this podcast is ongoing, so data described here may change as research progresses.
    In this podcast, Cancer.Net Associate Editor for Lung Cancer, Dr. Charu Aggarwal, and Cancer.Net Specialty Editor for Thymoma, Dr. Ryan Gentzler, discuss what people with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer should know about their treatment options before and after surgery, called neoadjuvant therapy and adjuvant therapy, respectively.
    Dr. Aggarwal is the Leslye Heisler Associate Professor of Medicine in the Hematology-Oncology Division at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine. Dr. Gentzler is a thoracic medical oncologist and Associate Professor of Medicine in the Division of Hematology/Oncology at the University of Virginia (UVA) Comprehensive Cancer Center.
    View disclosures for Dr. Aggarwal and Dr. Gentzler at Cancer.Net. 
    To begin, Dr. Gentzler will discuss what people with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer should know about neoadjuvant treatment options before lung surgery. Welcome, Dr. Gentzler.
    Dr. Gentzler: Hi, this is Ryan Gentzler from the University of Virginia. We're here to discuss the role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and immunotherapy for the treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. So first, I thought I'd address some of the data and definition of what is neoadjuvant treatment. So when we think about treating lung cancer that is not metastatic, that is earlier stage disease, there typically involves multimodality treatment. Sometimes these lesions or tumors can be very small and can be stage I and treated with surgery alone or perhaps radiation alone and no further treatment is needed. But the vast majority of lung cancers that are considered early stage are in fact either larger tumors, involve lymph nodes, and typically fall into the category of stage II or III lung cancers. And these are cancers that often require multiple treatments beyond the local surgery approach alone.
    When we think about how we deliver that treatment, it can either be given before surgery or after a surgery. If we give treatment before a surgery, we call that neoadjuvant. If it is given after the surgery, we call that adjuvant. And most of the data that we have today in lung cancer uses one or the other of these approaches, and we don't typically give treatments both before and after, at least in terms of the chemotherapy part of that treatment.
    Historically, most of the data exists in the adjuvant treatment of lung cancer going back several decades that showed that the benefit of chemotherapy after a surgery, particularly for those with stage II and stage III lung cancer, derived a clear benefit of survival by giving chemotherapy after surgery. More recently, with the advent of immune therapy, which we have used in patients with stage IV lung cancer as well as those with stage III lung cancer who cannot undergo surgery, those immunotherapy drugs have been shown to improve overall survival and improve clinical outcomes for a wide range of patients with more advanced disease. And so in the last 4 or 5 years, we have really looked at new trials that have added immunotherapy in what we call perioperative space, either before surgery or after surgery for those that have surgically resectable disease

    • 31 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
9 Ratings

9 Ratings

Top Podcasts In Health & Fitness

Scicomm Media
iHeartPodcasts
iHeartPodcasts
John R. Miles
Ten Percent Happier
Peter Attia, MD

You Might Also Like

TED
NPR
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)
JAMA Network
NEJM Group