150 episodes

Cancer.Net Podcast features trusted, timely, and compassionate information for people with cancer, survivors, their families, and loved ones. Expert tips on coping with cancer, recaps of the latest research advances, and thoughtful discussions on cancer care

Cancer.Net Podcast ASCO

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Cancer.Net Podcast features trusted, timely, and compassionate information for people with cancer, survivors, their families, and loved ones. Expert tips on coping with cancer, recaps of the latest research advances, and thoughtful discussions on cancer care

    Research Highlights from ESMO Congress 2022, with David Ilson, MD, PhD, FASCO, Sumanta Pal, MD, FASCO, and Tian Zhang, MD

    Research Highlights from ESMO Congress 2022, with David Ilson, MD, PhD, FASCO, Sumanta Pal, MD, FASCO, and Tian Zhang, MD

    ASCO: You’re listening to a podcast from Cancer.Net. This cancer information website is produced by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, known as ASCO, the voice of the world's oncology professionals.
    The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guests’ statements on this podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. Cancer research discussed in this podcast is ongoing, so data described here may change as research progresses.
    In this podcast, Cancer.Net Editorial Board members discuss new research in gastrointestinal and genitourinary cancers presented at this year’s ESMO Congress, held September 9-13 in Paris, France.
    First, Dr. David Ilson discusses treatment advances in liver, colorectal, and gastric, or stomach, cancers. Dr. Ilson is an attending physician and member at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and a professor of medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College.
    You can view Dr. Ilson’s disclosures at Cancer.Net.
    Dr. Ilson: Hi, I'm Dr. David Ilson from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. I'm a GI medical oncologist, and it's my pleasure today to review some important presentations in GI cancers from the recent ESMO meeting in Paris from 2022. I have no relevant relationships to disclose for this discussion. So, important presentations were made in hepatocellular cancer, in colorectal cancer, and gastric and other cancers, and I'm going to highlight some of the key presentations from the meeting. 
    One of the most anxiously awaited presentations was one in hepatocellular or liver cancer. For patients that have advanced disease who are not candidates for surgery or local treatments, standard therapy now, it used to be lenvatinib and sorafenib, and that's now been replaced by the combination of an immunotherapy drug, atezolizumab combined with the drug bevacizumab. That's the new standard of care. And recently, we had a promising data for another immunotherapy combination using the drug durvalumab combined with tremelimumab.
    So what we saw this year was another important global study looking at the first-line use of immunotherapy in hepatocellular cancer. This trial took 794 patients with advanced hepatocellular cancer and assigned them to a standard treatment with a drug called lenvatinib. Lenvatinib and sorafenib were the old standard treatments for hepatocellular cancer. And lenvatinib alone was compared to a combination of lenvatinib and pembrolizumab, an immunotherapy drug. The primary endpoint was to see whether adding immunotherapy to lenvatinib improved survival. And this was a negative trial. It did not show an improvement in survival for adding pembrolizumab to lenvatinib over lenvatinib alone, and there was really no significant difference in the time that patients were on treatment. The response was slightly higher with the addition of pembrolizumab to lenvatinib, but again there was no survival difference. So this combination will not move forward. And again, as I said earlier, the new standard first-line treatment is atezolizumab plus bevacizumab.
    In colorectal cancer, probably one of the most exciting presentations was the use of immunotherapy treatments in locally advanced colon cancer. There is an important subset of colorectal cancer that has what's called an MSI-high status. MSI-high colon cancers are very responsive to immunotherapy drugs, and there has been a lot of interest in patients with localized colorectal cancer using immunotherapy drugs prior to surgery rather than conventional chemotherapy or radiation. So this important trial looked at 112 patients with localized colorectal cancer. Most of the patients w

    • 28 min
    Making Metastatic Breast Cancer Clinical Trials More Inclusive, with Stephanie Walker, RN

    Making Metastatic Breast Cancer Clinical Trials More Inclusive, with Stephanie Walker, RN

    ASCO: You’re listening to a podcast from Cancer.Net. This cancer information website is produced by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, known as ASCO, the voice of the world's oncology professionals.
    The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guests’ statements on this podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. Cancer research discussed in this podcast is ongoing, so data described here may change as research progresses.
    At the 2022 ASCO Annual Meeting, registered nurse, breast cancer survivor, and patient advocate Stephanie Walker presented the results of the BECOME Research Project, which looked at Black patient participation in metastatic breast cancer clinical trials.
    In this podcast, Ms. Walker shares her story with Dr. Manali Patel, a medical oncologist and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Stanford University, as well as the Cancer.Net Associate Editor for Health Equity. They discuss Ms. Walker’s experience with metastatic breast cancer, how she became involved with patient advocacy and research, and the work being done within the oncology community to make cancer clinical trials more equitable and inclusive.
    View disclosures for Ms. Walker and Dr. Patel at Cancer.Net.
    Dr. Manali Patel: Hello, I'm Manali Patel. I'm a thoracic lung cancer doctor at Stanford University and the VA in Palo Alto. And I'm a researcher that's focused on trying to improve and overcome health disparities and really trying to achieve health equity. I'm also the Cancer.Net Associate Editor for Health Equity. And today it's my great pleasure to talk with Ms. Stephanie Walker. Stephanie is a registered nurse, a survivor of metastatic breast cancer, and a leading patient advocate. She's the lead author of the BECOME Research Project on increasing Black patient participation in metastatic breast cancer clinical trials, which she presented beautifully at the 2022 ASCO Annual Meeting. Stephanie, we can't thank you enough for talking with us today. I'm going to first start off by saying that I am from North Carolina. And Stephanie, I read so much about you over the past few years and noticed that you are living in Tarboro, North Carolina. Is that correct?
    Stephanie Walker: That is correct. I currently live there. We moved here originally in 2012, but this is my, I think, third or even fourth time living in North Carolina, moving back and forth between Thomasville and Durham and now permanently in Tarboro.
    Dr. Manali Patel: Well, I love that we share our Tar Heel roots. I am a Tar Heel born, Tar Heel bred. When I die, I'm a Tar Heel dead. So I can't thank you enough for sharing those roots and then also for sharing your story with us today. You were first diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer in 2015. Can you tell us a little bit about your experience with that diagnosis and what it was like to be diagnosed?
    Stephanie Walker: Well, actually the diagnosis in 2015 was my first diagnosis. I was not an early stager that had a recurrence, so I guess I could say breast cancer was never on my radar regarding family history. I thought maybe kidney disease or hypertension or those kind of things, but never breast cancer. So to say my life derailed at that time, it had. And I don't know if I ever grieved when I was told that I had metastatic breast cancer, I took it and just ran with it. I did not really fall off until many years later when I had to stop working. At the time I was diagnosed, I was working as an on-call nurse for a hospice company. So I was working 7 days on, 7 days off. So on my 7 days on is when I received a call and during my nap time. But yeah, it was very hard.
    But lik

    • 33 min
    2022 Research Round Up: Lung Cancer, Lymphoma, and Childhood Cancers

    2022 Research Round Up: Lung Cancer, Lymphoma, and Childhood Cancers

    ASCO: You’re listening to a podcast from Cancer.Net. This cancer information website is produced by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, known as ASCO, the voice of the world's oncology professionals.
    The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guests’ statements on this podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. Cancer research discussed in this podcast is ongoing, so data described here may change as research progresses.
    In the Research Round Up series, ASCO experts and members of the Cancer.Net Editorial Board discuss the most exciting and practice-changing research in their field and explain what it means for people with cancer. In today’s episode, our guests will discuss new research in lung cancer, lymphoma, and childhood cancer that was presented at the 2022 ASCO Annual Meeting, held June 3-7 in Chicago, Illinois.
    First, Dr. Charu Aggarwal will discuss 3 studies looking at treatment options for people with non-small cell lung cancer.
    Dr. Aggarwal is the Leslye Heisler Associate Professor of Medicine in the Hematology-Oncology Division at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She is also the Cancer.Net Associate Editor for Lung Cancer.
    You can view Dr. Aggarwal’s disclosures at Cancer.Net.
    Dr. Aggarwal: Hello and welcome to this Cancer.Net podcast. I'm bringing you updates from the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, held in Chicago in 2022. I'm Dr. Charu Aggarwal. I'm the Leslye Heisler Associate Professor for Lung Cancer Excellence at the University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center. I will be discussing updates on 3 studies today that offer insights and new advances in the management of patients with non-small cell lung cancer. I don't have any direct relationship with any of these companies or studies, and you can view a list of my disclosures on the Cancer.Net website.
    First off, I would like to talk a little bit about advances in the management of patients with EGFR exon 20 mutations. We know that a lot of advances have been made in the management of patients with non-small cell lung cancer, and much of that has been attributed to the fact that we are now able to deliver targeted therapy for a subset of patients. EGFR mutations form one such subset where we have a lot of oral drugs that are available, and we can offer these that improve survival, and patients can avoid chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and other IV infusional therapies. Within the subset of EGFR mutations lies this unique subset of EGFR exon 20 insertion mutations, which have been historically harder to target with currently available EGFR inhibitors. And over the last 5 years, we have seen tremendous growth of opportunities, targets, and new drugs for this subset of patients. The mutations in this subset forms about 2% to 5% of all non-small cell lung cancers. But now we have 2 FDA-approved drugs in this space, one being intravenously administered, amivantamab, and another that is orally available, mobocertinib. We covered this in a podcast as well as a blog, so please check those out on our Cancer.Net website.
    But building upon that progress, there is now another drug that was reported at ASCO. This drug is called CLN-081. And we saw preliminary activity in a phase 1 and 2 study of this molecule or this drug in patients with EGFR exon 20 insertion mutations. It's an orally available drug. The top line data is that it is safe, it is effective, it was tested in different doses. It was tested at less than 65 milligrams, 100 milligrams, and 150 milligrams, again, as I mentioned, administered o

    • 30 min
    Highlights from the 2022 MASCC Annual Meeting, with Maryam Lustberg, MD, MPH

    Highlights from the 2022 MASCC Annual Meeting, with Maryam Lustberg, MD, MPH

    ASCO: You’re listening to a podcast from Cancer.Net. This cancer information website is produced by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, known as ASCO, the voice of the world's oncology professionals.
    The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guests’ statements on this podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. Cancer research discussed in this podcast is ongoing, so data described here may change as research progresses.
    In this podcast, Dr. Maryam Lustberg discusses highlights from the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer’s 2022 Annual Meeting, held June 23-25 in Toronto.
    Dr. Lustberg is the Director of the Center for Breast Cancer at Smilow Cancer Hospital and Yale Cancer Center; Chief of Breast Medical Oncology at Yale Cancer Center; Associate Professor of Medicine at Yale School of Medicine; and the 2022 President of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer. She is also a member of the Cancer.Net Editorial Board.
    View Dr. Lustberg’s disclosures at Cancer.Net.
    Dr. Lustberg: Hello, everyone. I'm Dr. Maryam Lustberg. I am chief of breast oncology at Yale Cancer Center, co-chair of Symptom Intervention Committee for Alliance Clinical Trials, and the new president of the international society of Multinational Association of Cancer Supportive Care, or MASCC. And I'm here to talk to you about updates from the meeting that happened in Toronto in June of 2022. I have no relationships to disclose relevant to the topics that I will be talking about today.
    And there were 3 broad themes in the meeting that I would like to highlight for you. One theme was a global focus on disparities in the delivery of cancer supportive care. So we do know that even in North America, patients with different socioeconomic backgrounds, different races, different cultural backgrounds, may not have as full access to cancer supportive care services, and that can include access to symptom management, survivorship care, palliative care. The umbrella of cancer supportive care is quite broad, and it's really focused on supporting patients and their families throughout the care continuum in a very multidisciplinary, holistic way. And so what we're finding, unfortunately, similar to cancer treatment, access to the best supportive care in cancer can also face certain disparities in the U.S. and North America. And this is something that we talked quite a bit about in the meeting in terms of recognizing this as well as finding solutions for it. And similarly, globally, we know that access to symptom management strategies, access to palliative care, access to oncology rehab, all of these can be quite restricted in different regions of the world. So the meeting in Toronto was really a call to action to recognize this as a pressing issue for our global community. And we will be forming several task forces to really look towards solutions. And so we look forward in terms of looking at low-hanging fruit interventions that we can both provide in North America as well as globally so that really patients and families could have access to such an important part of cancer care.
    The second theme of the meeting focused on digital technologies as well as the impact of COVID-19 on the delivery of cancer supportive care. We know that the pandemic certainly shook the world, and it also impacted patients' access to supportive care services. These were often the services that were put on hold, understandably, during the resource-lean times and restricted access to services during the pandemic. So this was something that we absolutely recognize that this happened. It impacted

    • 9 min
    2022 Research Round Up: Head and Neck Cancer, Brain Tumors, and Health Equity

    2022 Research Round Up: Head and Neck Cancer, Brain Tumors, and Health Equity

    ASCO: You’re listening to a podcast from Cancer.Net. This cancer information website is produced by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, known as ASCO, the voice of the world's oncology professionals.
    The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guests’ statements on this podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. Cancer research discussed in this podcast is ongoing, so data described here may change as research progresses.
    In the Research Round Up series, ASCO experts and members of the Cancer.Net Editorial Board discuss the most exciting and practice-changing research in their field and explain what it means for people with cancer. In today’s episode, our guests will discuss new research in head and neck cancer, brain tumors, and health equity that was presented at the 2022 ASCO Annual Meeting, held June 3-7 in Chicago, Illinois.
    First, Dr. Cristina Rodriguez will discuss 2 studies on new treatment options for locally advanced head and neck cancer.
    Dr. Rodriguez is a medical oncologist at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, an Associate Professor in the Division of Medical Oncology at the University of Washington, and an Associate Member for solid tumor clinical research at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. She is also the Cancer.Net Associate Editor for Head and Neck Cancers.
    You can view Dr. Rodriguez’s disclosures at Cancer.Net.
    Dr. Rodriguez: Hello. My name is Christina Rodriguez. I'm a medical oncologist with a clinical and research focus on head and neck cancer. And today I'm going to discuss research on head and neck cancer that was presented at the most recent 2022 ASCO Annual Meeting. I don't have any relationship to disclose that pertains to the research that I will talk about today. I'd like to discuss 2 abstracts that I thought were practice changing or practice affirming that really addresses some of the key questions that patients and doctors like me have about the treatment of patients with head and neck cancer. So, as you know, most patients with head and neck cancer present with typically locally advanced disease, and most head and neck cancer patients are treated with the intent of curing them most of the time with the use of radiation either as the main treatment or after surgery. And many clinical trials have shown that when we add a chemotherapy called cisplatin to radiation, we improve curative outcomes for patients.
    But the first abstract that I will talk about, abstract 6003, asks the question "What do we do for patients who are not candidates for cisplatin chemotherapy?" And we know that a significant proportion of our patients will have other medical problems that could make it difficult for us to give chemotherapy and often will result in complications or more toxicity or in side effects for patients. This clinical trial was carried out in India, and it compared radiation alone for patients with head and neck cancer versus radiation given with a non-cisplatin chemotherapy called docetaxel. What's unique about this clinical trial is that it's specifically focused on patients who were not candidates for cisplatin chemotherapy, something that really hasn't been done for this population. Interestingly enough, they found that when we give docetaxel with radiation in these patients, we find that they do better, they live longer, and they feel better based on quality-of-life questionnaires.
    So I will say that this study, abstract 6003, tells us that even in patients who are not candidates for cisplatin to be given with radiation, there is an alternative treatment that we can use, such as docetaxel given with radiation, that might

    • 29 min
    Coping with Cancer Through Exercise, with Sheila Lahijani, MD, and Sami Mansfield

    Coping with Cancer Through Exercise, with Sheila Lahijani, MD, and Sami Mansfield

    ASCO: You’re listening to a podcast from Cancer.Net. This cancer information website is produced by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, known as ASCO, the voice of the world's oncology professionals.
    The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guests’ statements on this podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. Cancer research discussed in this podcast is ongoing, so data described here may change as research progresses.
    Brielle Gregory Collins: Hi, everyone. I'm Brielle Gregory Collins, a member of the Cancer.Net content team, and I'll be your host for today's Cancer.Net podcast. Cancer.Net is the patient information website of ASCO, the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Today we're going to be talking about coping with the mental and emotional challenges of cancer through exercise. Our guests today are Dr. Sheila Lahijani and Sami Mansfield. Dr. Lahijani is an associate clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the medical director of the Stanford Cancer Center Psychosocial Oncology Program. Dr. Lahijani is also an advisory panelist on the Cancer.Net Editorial Board. Thanks for joining us today, Dr. Lahijani.
    Dr. Sheila Lahijani: It's truly my pleasure to be here today, Brielle, with all of you.
    Brielle Gregory Collins: Thank you. Ms. Mansfield is the founder of Cancer Wellness for Life and the director of Oncology Wellness for the Sarah Cannon Cancer Institute at HCA Midwest Health. Thanks for joining us today, Ms. Mansfield.
    Sami Mansfield: Thanks, everybody, for having me. Excited to be here as well.
    Brielle Gregory Collins: Before we begin, we should mention that Dr. Lahijani and Ms. Mansfield do not have any relationships to disclose related to this podcast, but you can find their full disclosure statements on Cancer.Net. Now to start, Dr. Lahijani, how can a cancer diagnosis impact a person's mental and emotional well-being?
    Dr. Sheila Lahijani: Thanks for asking this question, Brielle. Usually, when people want to know the answer to this, what I preface it by saying is that there is a spectrum of responses. Many people find themselves to be quite distressed because cancer continues to have quite a lot of stigma, both in this country and as well as internationally. People oftentimes associate it with feelings of despair, anxiety, and helplessness. Having said that, many of these responses and reactions are normal. Some people can progress to have many more significant emotional responses and reactions that can become more disruptive to their lives and to the roles that they play a part in. We really try to meet patients where they're at to better understand how they've previously coped with past life challenges and/or traumas and to identify what strengths they have, what coping mechanisms they have to help them manage the distress associated with cancer. There are patients who also have a history of past psychiatric diagnoses and problems, in which case getting diagnosed with cancer and undergoing cancer treatment can cause a lot more difficulty. So each person is different. There are a lot of, quote-unquote, "normal" reactions, responses and reactions, that we as providers do validate and reflect back to the patients. And then there are those that can cause many more problems, and those are the ones we really need to address.
    Brielle Gregory Collins: Okay. And getting into some of those problems, what are some of the most common mental and emotional challenges that people face during cancer?
    Dr. Sheila Lahijani: The majority of people feel very anxious. And I've shared this wit

    • 28 min

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