17 episodes

Dead Ideas in Teaching and Learning is a podcast from the Columbia University Center for Teaching and Learning. Our mission is to encourage instructors, students, and leaders in higher education to reflect on what they believe about teaching and learning.

Dead Ideas in Teaching and Learning Columbia University Center for Teaching and Learning

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    • 5.0 • 11 Ratings

Dead Ideas in Teaching and Learning is a podcast from the Columbia University Center for Teaching and Learning. Our mission is to encourage instructors, students, and leaders in higher education to reflect on what they believe about teaching and learning.

    Why Educating for Wholeness, Social Justice, and Liberation Is the Future of Higher Education: A Conversation with Laura I. Rendón

    Why Educating for Wholeness, Social Justice, and Liberation Is the Future of Higher Education: A Conversation with Laura I. Rendón

    Today we speak with renowned teaching and learning theorist and thought leader Laura I. Rendón (https://laurarendon.net/bio/), a Professor Emerita at the University of Texas-San Antonio and author of the book Sentipensante (Sensing/Thinking) Pedagogy: Educating for Wholeness, Social Justice and Liberation (2009). As the pandemic nears its end, Dr. Rendón believes we are now in “nepantla”, or a liminal space of inquiry and possibility, regarding the future of higher education. As we return to campuses and classrooms, we need to deeply question what “normal” should be and make sure our pedagogical choices offer a “better” normal for all students, and especially for underserved populations. We need to ask ourselves what kind of an education students now need to help society and to solve our complex problems. We should be mindful of centering equity and inclusion in all of the learning experiences that students encounter.  Dr. Rendón discusses some of the entrenched beliefs that dictate the current culture of teaching and learning, and how they could be shifted to embrace a new vision of higher education. Transcript available at ctl.columbia.edu/podcast (https://ctl.columbia.edu/resources-and-technology/resources/podcast/)Resources* Sentipensante (Sensing/Thinking) Pedagogy: Educating for Wholeness, Social Justice and Liberation (2009) by Laura I. Rendón* The Four Agreements (1997) by don Miguel Ruiz * Relationship-Rich Education: How Human Connections Drive Success in College (2020) by Peter Felten and Leo M. Lambert * “Dead Ideas: Reflections for Post-Pandemic Learning (https://www.insidehighered.com/advice/2021/06/16/pandemic-has-called-question-host-generally-accepted-teaching-practices-opinion)” (June 2021, Inside Higher Education) by Catherine Ross, Amanda Irvin, and Soulaymane Kachani 

    • 42 min
    Why Dead Ideas? A Conversation with Host Catherine Ross and Ian Althouse

    Why Dead Ideas? A Conversation with Host Catherine Ross and Ian Althouse

    Welcome to Season 3 of Dead Ideas in Teaching and Learning! We begin this season by turning the conversation around: our guest today is Catherine Ross (https://ctl.columbia.edu/about/team/catherine-ross/), Executive Director of the Columbia Center for Teaching and Learning, and host of Dead Ideas. Catherine, interviewed by Ian Althouse (https://ctl.columbia.edu/about/team/althouse/), Senior Assistant Director at the Columbia CTL, shares why she decided to start this podcast—including her own “aha” moment—and what motivates and inspires her to continue the work of unpacking implicit assumptions in teaching and learning in higher education. Catherine also gives listeners a sneak peek of this season’s upcoming guests. In Season 3, we will focus on teaching and learning systems in the academy, and how they need to be changed. Topics include beliefs about rigor, the value of undergraduate education in research universities, how to generate systemic change in institutions, issues of equity, and how faculty are evaluated.  

    • 29 min
    One Year Later: Learning in a Pandemic with Two Columbia Undergraduate Students

    One Year Later: Learning in a Pandemic with Two Columbia Undergraduate Students

    In May 2020, two months after Columbia transitioned to fully remote learning due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we interviewed four Columbia undergrads about their experiences. Now almost a full year out, we wanted to check in again on the student experience and identify what dead ideas have surfaced in this extended period of disruption. In this episode, we speak with Sajan Bar, a junior in the School of Engineering and Applied Science and Michelle Yao, a junior in Columbia College, who both serve as undergraduate teaching and learning consultants as part of the CTL’s Students as Pedagogical Partners initiative. They discuss community building, study practices, grading and assessment, and share what they hope will remain and what will be left behind as we move towards more face-to-face settings. Learn more at ctl.columbia.edu/podcast

    • 38 min
    Community in Teaching: A Conversation with Columbia Graduate Students

    Community in Teaching: A Conversation with Columbia Graduate Students

    In his 1993 article, “Teaching as Community Property: Putting an End to Pedagogical Solitude”, renowned educational psychologist Lee Shulman argued that if teaching were viewed as community property, rather than something that happens behind closed classroom doors, there would be more value placed on teaching and more rigor in the evaluation of teaching. In today’s episode, we unpack this argument and its underlying dead ideas with Columbia doctoral students Thomas Preston, Diana Newby, and Ami Yoon—all who have worked in multiple teaching capacities at Columbia University. They discuss how their experiences have led them to believe that collaboration has a range of benefits in teaching and learning. Learn more at ctl.columbia.edu/podcast

    • 34 min
    What Inclusive Instructors Do with Tracie Marcella Addy, Derek Dube, Khadijah A. Mitchell, and Mallory SoRelle

    What Inclusive Instructors Do with Tracie Marcella Addy, Derek Dube, Khadijah A. Mitchell, and Mallory SoRelle

    What are small steps instructors can take to teach inclusively? Where, when, and how should they be implemented? In today’s episode, we chat with the authors of the new book What Inclusive Instructors Do: Principles and Practices for Excellence in College Teaching (2021). These experts share approaches to conducting inclusive courses that are student-centered, community-based, and transparent, and discuss why these approaches are important—as well as the dead ideas that they debunk. Learn more at ctl.columbia.edu/podcast.
    Authors:



    Tracie Marcella Addy, Associate Dean of Teaching and Learning at Lafayette College (PA)


    Derek Dube, Associate Professor of Biology and Director of the Center for Student Research and Creative Activity at the University of St. Joseph (CT)


    Khadijah A. Mitchell, Peter C.S. D’Aubermont, M.D., '73 Scholar of Health and Life Sciences and Assistant Professor of Biology at Lafayette College


    Mallory SoRelle, Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University

    • 41 min
    Online Teaching and Learning with Roxanne Russell

    Online Teaching and Learning with Roxanne Russell

    What are the benefits of online education? What misconceptions or “dead ideas” do both instructors and students harbor about teaching and learning online? And how can online activities (both synchronous and asynchronous) benefit student engagement, community-building, and inclusion in the classroom? In today’s episode, we speak with Roxanne Russell, Director of Online Education at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, about all things online, including what she has learned from her students and the “aha” moment that inspired her to start her career in online education. Learn more at ctl.columbia.edu/podcast

    • 33 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
11 Ratings

11 Ratings

mindofmoser ,

Great theme

Wonderful theme for an education podcast. It’s great to see CTL director go out and share her expertise and find great guests.

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