54 episodes

Dead Ideas in Teaching and Learning is a podcast from the Columbia University Center for Teaching and Learning. Our mission is to encourage instructors, students, and leaders in higher education to reflect on what they believe about teaching and learning.

Dead Ideas in Teaching and Learning Columbia University Center for Teaching and Learning

    • Education
    • 5.0 • 20 Ratings

Dead Ideas in Teaching and Learning is a podcast from the Columbia University Center for Teaching and Learning. Our mission is to encourage instructors, students, and leaders in higher education to reflect on what they believe about teaching and learning.

    Passing the Baton: A New Chapter for Dead Ideas

    Passing the Baton: A New Chapter for Dead Ideas

    In today’s episode, we say a bittersweet goodbye to our wonderful podcast host, Columbia Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) Executive Director Catherine Ross (https://ctl.columbia.edu/about/team/catherine-ross/), as she will be retiring from Columbia in June. Catherine sits down with Amanda Irvin (https://ctl.columbia.edu/about/team/amanda-irvin/), Senior Director of Faculty Programs and Services here at the Columbia CTL, who will be taking the helm as our next podcast host, starting in the fall 2024 season. Catherine and Amanda reflect on their “favorite” dead ideas and episodes, as well as dead ideas that have yet to be discussed, and how this podcast has impacted our Center’s work internally. We’d like to thank Catherine for her passion and leadership as our podcast host over the past four years, and for her unfailing dedication to changing higher education teaching!This will be the last episode of Season 8 of Dead Ideas in Teaching and Learning. We will be back in fall 2024 with Season 9. Thank you for listening! 

    • 41 min
    How to Help Adjuncts Not Want to Give Up with Kerry O’Grady

    How to Help Adjuncts Not Want to Give Up with Kerry O’Grady

    In today’s episode we examine the systemic issues and dead ideas that underlie the hiring and supporting of contingent faculty. We speak with Kerry O’Grady (https://business.columbia.edu/staff/people/kerry-ogrady), Director for Teaching Excellence at the Samberg Institute for Teaching Excellence at Columbia Business School. Dr. O’Grady discusses some of the “normalized” practices that often leave adjunct instructors with a lack of resources and support for their teaching. She then provides research-based recommendations that can help adjunct faculty feel more valued and empowered, as noted in her letter to the editor (https://www.chronicle.com/blogs/letters/how-to-help-adjuncts-not-want-to-give-up) in The Chronicle of Higher Education, in response to an article titled, “Adjunct Professors Face a ‘Constant Struggle to Not Give Up,’ Report Says (https://www.chronicle.com/article/adjunct-professors-face-a-constant-struggle-to-not-give-up-report-says),” (October 26, 2023). Resources* “Adjunct Professors Face a ‘Constant Struggle to Not Give Up,’ Report Says (https://www.chronicle.com/article/adjunct-professors-face-a-constant-struggle-to-not-give-up-report-says)” (October 26, 2023, The Chronicle of Higher Education) by Amita Chatterjee* “How to Help Adjuncts Not Want to Give Up (https://www.chronicle.com/blogs/letters/how-to-help-adjuncts-not-want-to-give-up)” (November 29, 2023, The Chronicle of Higher Education) by Kerry O’Grady

    • 29 min
    Notes from the Field: Dead Ideas from Columbia CTL Educational Developers

    Notes from the Field: Dead Ideas from Columbia CTL Educational Developers

    In this episode of 4 mini-interviews, we ask Columbia Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) staff John Foo, Jamie Kim, Rebecca Petitti, and Corey Ptak what’s been on their minds as they go about their work as educational developers. What dead ideas in teaching and learning are they encountering in their day-to-day work with instructors, in their reading and research? What are the underlying systemic issues perpetuating these dead ideas? And how are these developers addressing these challenges? Listen in to hear their responses. Resources* Columbia Science of Learning Research Initiative (SOLER) (https://soler.columbia.edu/)* Columbia Office of the Provost’s Teaching and Learning Grants (https://vptli.columbia.edu/request-for-proposals/)* "The Tyranny of Content: ‘Content Coverage’ as a Barrier to Evidence-Based Teaching Approaches and Ways to Overcome It (https://www.lifescied.org/doi/10.1187/cbe.19-04-0079)" (Petersen et al., 2020) in CBE—Life Sciences Education* “Facilitating Change in Undergraduate STEM Instructional Practices: An Analytic Review of the Literature (https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/tea.20439)” Henderson, Beach, & Finkelstein, 2011) in Journal of Research in Science Teaching * “Four Categories of Change Strategies for Undergraduate STEM (https://ascnhighered.org/ASCN/change_theories/collection/four_quadrants.html)” (Henderson, Beach, & Finkelstein, 2011) in Accelerating Systemic Change in STEM Higher Education * “Chemistry and Racism: A Special Topics Course for Students Taking General Chemistry at Barnard College in Fall 2020” (Babb & Austin, 2022) in Journal of Chemical Education * CTL Teaching Transformations Reflection from Rachel Narehood Austin

    • 36 min
    Why is There No Training on How to Teach Graduate Students? with Leonard Cassuto

    Why is There No Training on How to Teach Graduate Students? with Leonard Cassuto

    In this episode, we continue this season’s examination of graduate education, now looking into how institutions often overlook the need for preparing faculty to teach graduate students and graduate courses. We unpack the dead ideas that underlie this neglect with Leonard Cassuto (https://www.fordham.edu/academics/departments/english/faculty/leonard-cassuto/), professor of English at Fordham University, and author of The Chronicle of Higher Education article “Why is There No Training on How to Teach Graduate Students? (https://www.chronicle.com/article/why-is-there-no-training-on-how-to-teach-graduate-students)” (May 8, 2023).

    • 31 min
    Teaching Development in Doctoral Education: Let’s Ask the Grad Students!

    Teaching Development in Doctoral Education: Let’s Ask the Grad Students!

    In this episode, we continue the conversation from our last episode on the topic of teaching development in doctoral education—this time from the student perspective! With co-host Caitlin DeClercq, Senior Assistant Director of Graduate Student Programs and Services at the Columbia CTL, we are joined by Columbia doctoral students Anirbaan Banerjee, Sara Jane Samuel, and Anwesha Sengupta. They share their experiences, thoughts, and advice on all things teaching development in doctoral education.

    • 30 min
    Teaching Development in Doctoral Education: Where, When, and How?

    Teaching Development in Doctoral Education: Where, When, and How?

    Welcome back to Dead Ideas in Teaching and Learning! In our first episode of Season 8, we speak with Drs. Benjamin Rifkin, Rebecca Natow, Nicholas Salter, and Shayla Shorter about their article in The Chronicle of Higher Education titled “Why Doctoral Programs Should Require Courses on Pedagogy (https://www.chronicle.com/article/why-doctoral-programs-should-require-courses-on-pedagogy)” (March 16, 2023). Drs. Rifkin, Natow, Salter, and Shorter make the case for paying far more attention to developing teaching skills in doctoral programs. They share research they conducted to examine the “disconnect between what we are trained to do in graduate school and what we are expected to do in the college classroom,” and offer four next steps to better prepare Ph.D.s to teach. Benjamin Rifkin is Professor of Russian and Interim Provost at Fairleigh Dickinson University, Rebecca Natow is Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy, and Director of the Higher Education Leadership and Policy Studies program at Hofstra University, Nicholas Salter is Associate Professor of Industrial-Organizational Psychology at Hofstra University, and Shayla Shorter is a Clinical Collaborative Librarian and Assistant Curator for the Medical Library at NYU Grossman School of Medicine. Resource* “Why Doctoral Programs Should Require Courses on Pedagogy (https://www.chronicle.com/article/why-doctoral-programs-should-require-courses-on-pedagogy)” (March 16, 2023, Chronicle of Higher Education) by Benjamin Rifkin, Rebecca Natow, Nicholas Salter, and Shayla Shorter

    • 36 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
20 Ratings

20 Ratings

Tinymenace ,

Inspiring and Thoughtful

As a regular listener, I find the topics that are covered and the speakers who are invited reflect up-to-the-moment concerns in the state of teaching and learning in higher education. The guests—especially students—always elicit new thoughts and stimulate new ideas to eclipse those pernicious “dead” ones. This is definitely worth a regular listen if you are a faculty member, administrator, or graduate student who is involved in teaching and learning in a higher education context.

nyc jloo ,

Well-curated content on teaching and learning

As someone who is a life long learner and who aspires to be the best teacher I can be, these podcasts are inspiring.

mindofmoser ,

Great theme

Wonderful theme for an education podcast. It’s great to see CTL director go out and share her expertise and find great guests.

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