100 episodes

Our podcast is here to help humanize Alzheimer’s disease, by speaking with the experts in our community to keep you informed on the latest headlines, research studies, and caregiver resources.

Dementia Matters Wisconsin Alzheimer's Disease Research Center

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.5 • 65 Ratings

Our podcast is here to help humanize Alzheimer’s disease, by speaking with the experts in our community to keep you informed on the latest headlines, research studies, and caregiver resources.

    Caregivers, Care Partners and People with Dementia: Brainstorming New Interventions for Dementia Care

    Caregivers, Care Partners and People with Dementia: Brainstorming New Interventions for Dementia Care

    When talking about dementia caregiving, researchers are often working toward new treatments and strategies for supporting people with Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. But how can we push the topic further and learn how we can better support dementia caregivers themselves? Dr. Eric Larson joins the podcast to discuss possible interventions to support patients with dementia and their caregivers and care partners. Dr. Larson chaired a National Academy of Medicine committee focused on researching dementia caregiving interventions. As part of their report titled “Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward,” the committee found that two models, the Collaborative Care Model and REACH (Resources for Enhancing Alzheimer’s Caregiving Health), had the most evidence of benefits for supporting people with dementia and their care partners and caregivers. Discussing this new report, the recent approval of aducanumab, and the field of geriatrics as a whole, Dr. Larson shines a light on the nuances of dementia research and dementia caregiving.


    Guest: Eric Larson, MD, MPH, Senior Investigator, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute


     


    Questions:


    1:07 - What sparked your interest in becoming a geriatrician and Alzheimer’s disease/dementia researcher?


    2:35 - What would you say to young medical students looking for a specialty, and even considering geriatrics?


    3:33 - Why do you think the field fails to attract younger doctors?


    5:13 - What is the role of the National Academy of Medicine, and why did it conduct and release this report on caregiving?


    7:29 - Can you offer us a brief summary of the findings or the key things that you think our audience should know about?


    10:48 - What are the current limitations of the existing research on dementia care interventions for patients and caregivers, and how can we overcome those limitations?


    12:38 - What is the difference between a care partner and a caregiver as you note in the report?


    14:03 - What are some community, policy, or societal interventions that really should be explored?


    15:46 - Does this report mean that we stop programs with low-strength of benefits, and if not, how do we continue to evaluate these programs and expand on them?


    17:12 - Given the FDA approval of aducanumab, do you worry that more attention and resources will be pulled away from care work and care partner/caregiving that’s needed in research and clinical care toward this medication?


    19:42 - What would you say to someone about to become an Alzheimer’s disease caregiver or care partner?


     


    Show Notes:


    Read Dr. Eric Larson’s bio on the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute’s website.


    Find a free download of the National Academies’ report, “Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward,” here.


    To learn more about the National Academies, find them on their website. For information about their research, publications, and events focused on dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, visit this page from their website.


    Find other resources related to this report by the National Academy of Medicine here:


    Report Highlights

    Press Release

    Recommendations

    • 23 min
    Tackling Stigma and Alzheimer’s Disease within the AAPI Community

    Tackling Stigma and Alzheimer’s Disease within the AAPI Community

    Vince Tien and Dr. Dung Trinh join the podcast to discuss the many ways Alzheimer’s disease affects the Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) community. Vince Tien and Dr. Trinh both work as part of 360 Clinic, a multi-specialty medical group focused on telehealth services. With their experience in healthcare and telehealth services amidst the pandemic, Tien and Dr. Trinh describe the barriers and stigma that discourage the AAPI community from seeking help for dementia and the ways that we can dismantle those barriers. 


    Guests: Vince Tien, co-founder, CEO, 360 Clinic, and Dung Trinh, MD, chief medical officer, 360 Clinic


     


    Episode Topics:


    1:13 Vince Tien, what is your background in healthcare? How did you get involved in Alzheimer's disease and dementia care?


    3:43 Dr. Trinh, what is your experience in caring for people with Alzheimer’s disease and dementia?


    6:06 What are the health-related needs of AAPI communities? And, when it comes to dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, what are these communities’ needs?


    7:44 Is there a certain perception of dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, and cognition within the AAPI community? 


    9:22 How do you find common ground between accessibility issues of technology and the benefits of telehealth?


    13:07 What role does stigma play in the Asian American or Vietnamese communities specifically when it comes to Alzheimer’s disease? How does it affect caregiving and family members?


    14:18 How do we start destigmatizing Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, and cognitive change within the Asian American community?


    16:06 How does healthcare address the cultural, economical, linguistic barriers that Asian Americans experience regarding public health messages and care?


    17:18 How can healthcare systems and organizations provide care for underresourced and underrepresented families who are suffering from dementia-related illnesses?


    19:58 What would be the one thing you’d want the Asian American community to know about Alzheimer’s disease and dementia care?


     


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    Show Notes:


    To learn more about 360 Clinic, find them at their website, Instagram, and Twitter.


    Learn more about Dr. Dung Trinh at his LinkedIn and his Facebook Page.


    Learn more about Vince Tien at his LinkedIn.

    • 25 min
    Creative Care: The Power of Imagination in Dementia Caregiving

    Creative Care: The Power of Imagination in Dementia Caregiving

    What would happen if caregiving strategies were inspired by wonder rather than memory? That’s what Dr. Anne Basting, founder and president of the nonprofit TimeSlips, asked when she began her research into how the arts could be integrated into dementia caregiving. Basting joins the podcast to discuss her caregiving approach rooted in creative engagement and imagination. From storytelling to beautiful questions to performance, Basting describes a new way of caregiving that helps caregivers and families meet patients and loved ones where they’re at to have meaningful connections and spark joy in the later years of life.


    Guest: Anne Basting, PhD, professor of English at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, founder and president of TimeSlips, author of Creative Care


    Episode Topics:


    1:31 - What inspired you to bring the arts and humanities to dementia care?


    4:51 - Why did you write Creative Care, and what do you want readers to leave with?


    7:49 - What are “beautiful questions” and can you offer a few examples?


    14:32 - What is in the Creative Care Imagination Kit and why is each component important to the process?


    15:49 - You’ve staged theater productions in care facilities as part of this process. How do performers in these plays respond to being a part of theater and how does the audience respond to the performances?


    18:43 - How can people get involved in this organization and what do you recommend to people who would like something like this in a local care facility?


    19:48 - What would you say to someone about to embark on the caregiving journey with someone with dementia?


     


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    Show Notes:


    Read Anne Basting’s biography on her website.


    Learn more about Anne Basting’s book, Creative Care: A Revolutionary Approach to Dementia and Elder Care, and her Creative Care Imagination Kit on her website here.


    Learn about Anne Basting’s nonprofit organization, TimeSlips, at its website for information on services, resources, and ways to get involved. Also find TimeSlips on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.

    • 23 min
    Better Now than Never: Quit Smoking to Reduce Your Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease

    Better Now than Never: Quit Smoking to Reduce Your Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease

    Researchers have produced many studies on how smoking affects parts of the body, such as the lungs or heart, but what about the brain? In today’s podcast, Adrienne Johnson, PhD, discusses her research on cigarette smoking and risk for dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. As part of a 2021 study, she found a person’s risk for dementia and Alzheimer's disease can be affected by how recently they’ve smoked. Diving into her research, the effects of smoking on different communities, and resources to support current smokers as they quit, Dr. Johnson details the impact of smoking on the brain and her hopes to develop new interventions to motivate smokers to quit for good.


    Guest: Adrienne Johnson, PhD, assistant scientist at the University of Wisconsin Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention


    Episode Topics:


    1:17 What sparked your interest in studying the effects of cigarette smoking and, particularly, how it affects cognitive decline?


    3:47 What are the effects of smoking on Alzheimer’s disease risk and/or general cognitive decline?


    5:28 Why do you think there’s a difference in risk levels for Alzheimer’s disease and then for dementia?


    6:27 Are there other things you can share about what you have found with your preliminary studies on smoking as a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease?


    8:38 You haven’t found a quantity relationship between the amount a person smokes and their risk for Alzheimer’s disesase, but rather a relationship based on smoking recency. Could you describe that further?


    11:12 You’ve also done work on how there’s more disadvantaged communities that might be suffering from tobacco use compared to others. Can you speak on that?


    13:01 How can caregivers and/or family motivate or support current smokers so that they can quit?


    14:25 Is there a difference in a population that already has cognitive impairment? Do you have different strategies that we might use to support those individuals?


    18:16 What are you looking to study in the future?


    19:21 Can you share some resources where listeners can get help to stop smoking or where they can find resources for a loved one?


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    Show Notes:


    Read Dr. Adrienne Johnson’s biography on the UW Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention (UW-CTRI) website.


    To learn more about the UW Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention (UW-CTRI) and the work they do, find them on their website, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram.


    Find resources on how to quit smoking here:


    Learn more information about smoking, vaping, and how to quit at https://ctri.wisc.edu

    1-800-QUIT-NOW is a national smoking cessation quitline. Though it’s resources vary from state to state, in Wisconsin they can provide callers with free evidence-based evidence-based smoking cessation medications and a free coaching session to help you quit.

    Smokefree.gov is a website with a variety of resources, including texting programs, quit plans, mobile apps, and information on how to quit for specialty populations.

    Talk to primary care providers for prescribed medication and counseling for quitting smoking

    • 22 min
    Dentistry and Dementia: The Importance of Caring for Oral Health

    Dentistry and Dementia: The Importance of Caring for Oral Health

    Elisa Ghezzi, DDS, PhD, joins the podcast to discuss the importance of maintaining oral health throughout one’s life, and especially as one grows older. Discussing the effects of oral health on our systemic health, oral health’s connection to dysphagia, and how caregivers can help dementia patients care for their teeth, Dr. Ghezzi provides insight on how vital it is to care for our oral health as we age.


    Guest: Elisa Ghezzi, DDS, PhD, adjunct clinical assistant professor, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, provider, Voiage Portable Dentistry


     


    Episode Topics:


    1:15 - How did you get interested in oral health in older adults?


    3:28 - Why isn’t there more training or education in general dentistry for an older population?


    4:34 - What are oral diseases, and what are their effects on systemic health?


    6:00 - Is there an association between oral disease and cognition or cognitive impairment?


    8:50 - IDoes inflammation affect oral health?


    10:00 - What can be done to prevent oral conditions?


    13:39 - What can we do to help protect our teeth?


    16:38 - What should older adults and people who are experiencing dementia do about flossing?


    19:05 - For our audience members who might be caring for someone who has dementia,, what recommendations would you offer when the person they are caring for is resistant to the act of having someone brush their teeth?


    22:10 - What is the relationship between oral health, oral disease, and dysphagia?


    28:20 - What is the most pressing issue facing older adults and their oral health care?


     





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    Vote for Dementia Matters in the 2021 Podcast Awards! Voting closes July 31st!

    • 32 min
    Vote for Dementia Matters in the 2021 Podcast Awards!

    Vote for Dementia Matters in the 2021 Podcast Awards!

    Dementia Matters has entered into the 2021 People's Choice Podcast Awards! If you enjoy our show and want to support us, register and vote before July 31st at www.podcastawards.com, and vote for us under the Health and People's Choice categories. We, the Dementia Matters team, hope that by participating, we can continue spreading our message and educate new listeners about Alzheimer’s Disease, Dementia, and brain health.


    Our background music is "Cases to Rest" by Blue Dot Sessions.


    Find Dementia Matters online - https://www.adrc.wisc.edu/dementia-ma...


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    Follow us on Twitter - https://twitter.com/WisconsinADRC


    Vote for Dementia Matters in the Podcast Awards - www.podcastawards.com

    • 1 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
65 Ratings

65 Ratings

Mikep 2 ,

Dementia Matters

This podcast is very helpful to me as a caregiver to my wife as she goes through MCI to now more advanced issues. This podcast helps me to learn and understand cognitive impairment and what I might possibly do to provide better care. We are blessed with quality Family and Memory Doctors. This podcast gives me more understanding and how I might possibly better relate to our Doctors.

Zombie Ho ,

Thanks so much.

Thank you for this. I’m only 23 and helping my grandmother caring for my grandfather through this journey and you’re right, there’s so little on it. I’m a part of the google generation. I’m used to looking something up and finding hundreds of articles, forums, podcasts, YouTube videos, and support communities and there’s surprisingly little on this. Maybe because the google gen isn’t quite dealing with this yet, all the support groups I find are just a few middle age people talking and giving each other tips and support. And also the research itself is really just now taking off and being understood. Either way. I’m very happy for this resource.

Hatchet Right ,

Mindfulness

The least likely of all your podcasts that I think is relevant

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