77 episodes

Our podcast is here to help humanize Alzheimer’s disease, by speaking with the experts in our community to keep you informed on the latest headlines, research studies, and caretaker resources.

Dementia Matters Wisconsin Alzheimer's Disease Research Center

    • Medicine
    • 4.5, 45 Ratings

Our podcast is here to help humanize Alzheimer’s disease, by speaking with the experts in our community to keep you informed on the latest headlines, research studies, and caretaker resources.

    Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative investigates genetic risk of Alzheimer’s disease

    Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative investigates genetic risk of Alzheimer’s disease

    Research data collected from participants around the world has grown our understanding of genetic risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Guest Jessica Langbaum, PhD, is the co-director of the Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative at Banner Alzheimer’s Institute, which conducts clinical trials in people at high risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease. Langbaum discusses some recent findings in genetic predisposition for Alzheimer’s disease, the psychological consequences of learning one’s risk, and testing interventions to delay or prevent the onset of symptoms. Guest: Jessica Langbaum, PhD, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute
    Episode Topics:
    What is the Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative? 3:44
    What is the difference between the APOE gene and the presenilin gene? 6:07
    How are you approaching disclosure of genetic risk to participants? 12:15
    What kind of responses have you received from participants who were told about their genetic risk? 15:32
    What would you recommend to an individual interested in learning their genetic risk? 22:19
    What are your recommendations for preventing dementia? 24:25
    What is the GeneMatch program? 26:35 
    How can individuals find a study to volunteer for? 29:48
    What is the most feasible form of therapy for dementia? 31:06

    • 37 min
    Zip Codes Are More than a Number: Study Finds Link between Neighborhoods and Memory-related Brain Structures

    Zip Codes Are More than a Number: Study Finds Link between Neighborhoods and Memory-related Brain Structures

    A recent study showed that research participants in the most highly disadvantaged neighborhoods had smaller hippocampal areas compared to research participants in more advantaged neighborhoods. The study’s first author explains the results and the tools researchers used to measure neighborhood disadvantage. Guest: Jack Hunt, PhD, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Medical Scientist Training Program
    Episode Topics:
    Association between neighborhood and brain structures: 1:52
    Study findings: 4:01
    Defining neighborhood disadvantage: 4:57
    Who were the research participants involved in the study? 5:42
    Why did you study the hippocampus in your research? 6:10
    Related cardiovascular factors: 8:20
    Using the Neighborhood Atlas to find neighborhood advantage by zip code: 10:22
    Neighborhoods disadvantage and individual socioeconomic status: 13:17
    Future research opportunities: 14:26
    What can people in the community do with the results of this study? 17:36
    Follow-up study: 18:23

    • 21 min
    Caregiver Coping Skills and Communication Strategies for a Pandemic

    Caregiver Coping Skills and Communication Strategies for a Pandemic

    COVID-19 Special Series The pandemic has placed a significant strain on the mental, social, and physical wellbeing of many caregivers, as well as individuals with cognitive decline. Our guest discusses COVID-19’s impact on underserved communities, offers communication tips, and reminds people to practice self-care. Guest: Andrea Gilmore-Bykovskyi, PhD, RN, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Nursing 
    Episode Topics: 
    Caregiver considerations for a pandemic. 2:31
    Self Care for caregivers. 6:05
    How the pandemic is affecting caregivers from underserved communities. 10:55
    Recommendations for caregivers when planning a trip to a medical facility. 13:51
    Advice for families trying to communicate with loved ones who are hospitalized. 15:36
    Tips for communicating with loved ones in a care facility. 17:43
    What caregivers should know for the future. 21:05 
    Show Notes: All of the important issues happening right now cannot be fully covered, so we strongly encourage you to go to trusted sources for specific information, such as the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, your state and local health department websites, and the Alzheimer's Association. You can also find resources on our website, and that of the Wisconsin Alzheimer's Institute. For other interesting and important stories on the COVID-19 pandemic, I would recommend my colleague at UW Health Jonathan Kohler, MD, MA, of the Surgery Sett podcast who has a special series called The Frontlines of COVID.

    • 23 min
    Mindfulness: What Is It, What Are the Benefits, Where to Begin

    Mindfulness: What Is It, What Are the Benefits, Where to Begin

    COVID-19 Special Series Stress, fear, and anxiety are common responses to the uncertainty during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, with the regular practice of mindfulness, the meditative process of bringing your attention to your body in the present moment, has been seen to help calm the worry. Our guest joins us to discuss using mindfulness methods to maintain and mange an overall wellbeing. Guest: Vincent Minichiello, MD, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health
    Episode Topics:
    How do you define mindfulness? 2:55
    How does mindfulness affect our body? 5:15
    Is it common to feel muscle relaxation while practicing mindfulness? 8:24
    What are mindfulness-based interventions? 9:54  
    Can mindfulness be health focused? 13:36
    Where do you see mindfulness fitting into healthcare, especially during the pandemic? 14:01
    How can mindfulness be useful during the COVID-19 pandemic? 16:11
    Can mindfulness be beneficial for individuals with cognitive impairments and caregivers? 18:21
    Where should you begin with a mindfulness practice? 20:20
    How helpful are online or phone apps for mindfulness practices? 22:50
    What are you doing to maintain your wellbeing during the COVID-19 pandemic? 25:18
    Show Notes: For listeners local to Madison, the UW Health Mindfulness Program offers in-person classes. They have also expanded to online classes due to the pandemic. Another great resource is The Center for Healthy Minds at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Apps our guest recommends are Mindfulness Coach, Calm, Buddhify and Headspace. A good starter book is Wherever You Go, There You Are by Jon Kabat-Zinn. All of the important issues happening right now cannot be fully covered, so we strongly encourage you to go to trusted sources for specific information, such as the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, your state and local health department websites, and the Alzheimer's Association. You can also find resources on our website, and that of the Wisconsin Alzheimer's Institute. For other interesting and important stories on the COVID-19 pandemic, I would recommend my colleague at UW Health Jonathan Kohler, MD, MA, of the Surgery Sett podcast who has a special series called The Frontlines of COVID.

    • 28 min
    Long Distance Caregiving and Connecting: How to Remain in Close Contact with Your Loved Ones while Following Physical Distancing Recommendations

    Long Distance Caregiving and Connecting: How to Remain in Close Contact with Your Loved Ones while Following Physical Distancing Recommendations

    COVID-19 Special Series As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic visiting and communicating with people living with memory loss, whether at home or in a care facility, has become more difficult. Our guest joins us to outline the different ways to communicate remotely, how rural communities are adapting to this change and methods to help caregivers cope. Guest: Becky DeBuhr, MS, Program Director, Alzheimer’s & Dementia Alliance of Wisconsin.
    Episode Topics:
    Ways for caregivers to connect with loved one:o    Technology 3:02o    Window visits 4:41o    Mail 6:00
    What can families reasonably ask of professional caregiving staff? 9:22
    How can family members communicate their support remotely? 12:45
    How are caregivers in rural communities being affected? Is there a difference in urban communities? 15:09
    Methods to help caregivers cope now and post-pandemic. 17:40
    Key tips for caregivers at home or in a facility. 20:21
    Show Notes: To learn more about the Alzheimer’s & Dementia Alliance of Wisconsin call 888-308-6251 or email support@alzwisc.org. The Wisconsin Department of Health Services provides guidance for all long-term care facilities, assisted living facilities, and facilities serving people with developmental disabilities in Wisconsin caring for patients who are elderly and/or have chronic medical conditions that place them at higher risk of developing severe complications from COVID-19. All of the important issues happening right now cannot be fully covered, so we strongly encourage you to go to trusted sources for specific information, such as the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, your state and local health department websites, and the Alzheimer's Association. You can also find resources on our website, and that of the Wisconsin Alzheimer's Institute. For other interesting and important stories on the COVID-19 pandemic, I would recommend my colleague at UW Health Jonathan Kohler, MD, MA, of the Surgery Sett podcast who has a special series called The Frontlines of COVID.

    • 26 min
    The Ins & Outs of Telemedicine: Quick Tips for Patients

    The Ins & Outs of Telemedicine: Quick Tips for Patients

    COVID-19 Special Series The field of telemedicine offers a diverse range of medical support services through telecommunication. Under the global pandemic, many providers have moved to telemedicine to assist their patients. Our guest discusses the advantages and disadvantages to using video and phone doctor visits and offers tips for best use of the services. Guest: Steve Barczi, MD, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health
    Episode Topics:
    What is telemedicine? 3:25
    Benefits of telemedicine 8:04
    Downside of telemedicine? 11:05
    Is telemedicine covered by insurance? 13:30  
    How has COVID-19 changed the utilization of telemedicine? 18:27
    Key takeaways 24:20
    Telemedicine tips for people with cognitive impairments and older adults 25:05
    How to prepare for a telemedicine visit 28:14
    Best practices for a telemedicine visit 30:45
    Show Notes: All of the important issues happening right now cannot be fully covered, so we strongly encourage you to go to trusted sources for specific information, such as the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, your state and local health department websites, and the Alzheimer's Association. You can also find resources on our website, and that of the Wisconsin Alzheimer's Institute. For other interesting and important stories on the COVID-19 pandemic, I would recommend my colleague at UW Health Jonathan Kohler, MD, MA, of the Surgery Sett podcast who has a special series called The Frontlines of COVID.

    • 34 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
45 Ratings

45 Ratings

Zombie Ho ,

Thanks so much.

Thank you for this. I’m only 23 and helping my grandmother caring for my grandfather through this journey and you’re right, there’s so little on it. I’m a part of the google generation. I’m used to looking something up and finding hundreds of articles, forums, podcasts, YouTube videos, and support communities and there’s surprisingly little on this. Maybe because the google gen isn’t quite dealing with this yet, all the support groups I find are just a few middle age people talking and giving each other tips and support. And also the research itself is really just now taking off and being understood. Either way. I’m very happy for this resource.

Hatchet Right ,

Mindfulness

The least likely of all your podcasts that I think is relevant

John Bellone ,

Great Podcast

As a geriatric neuropsychologist, I’m always looking for ways to broaden my knowledge base and stay up to date about new findings in the field. The topics have been really interesting and the guests have been top notch. The podcast is relevant for clinicians, researchers, and the general public, which is a hard balance to strike. Keep the great content coming!

Top Podcasts In Medicine

Listeners Also Subscribed To