25 episodes

EWA, the professional organization dedicated to improving the quality and quantity of education coverage in the media, hosts regular interviews and panel discussions with journalists and education professionals.

EWA Radio Education Writers Association

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    • 4.8, 16 Ratings

EWA, the professional organization dedicated to improving the quality and quantity of education coverage in the media, hosts regular interviews and panel discussions with journalists and education professionals.

    Budget Cuts Loom for Education. How Vulnerable Are Your Local Schools?

    Budget Cuts Loom for Education. How Vulnerable Are Your Local Schools?

    With the nation facing a pandemic-driven recession unlike any in generations, public schools are bracing for a big financial hit. Reporter Daarel Burnette II of Education Week shares insights from his school finance coverage during the crisis and a new database that gauges the economic vulnerability of districts from coast to coast.
     
    What is the potential human toll of budget cuts, especially on programs and services for already vulnerable students? What is the likelihood of massive teacher and staff layoffs, as well as the ripple effect on communities where schools are the largest employer? What additional costs are anticipated to meet the unique safety and social-distancing requirements to reopen school buildings for students? What lessons did districts learn from the economic fallout of the last recession a decade ago? Burnette also explains how the economic crisis will likely exacerbate inequalities for low-income students. And he discusses how local reporters can sharpen their coverage of school finance, likely to be one of the biggest education stories for the new academic year.

    • 22 min
    Do Students Have a Right to Literacy?

    Do Students Have a Right to Literacy?

    A federal appeals court recently ruled that the state of Michigan has failed to make sure children in Detroit are adequately educated. The April decision said the city’s schools have suffered from underfunding, poorly maintained and too few qualified teachers. While the state is contemplating an appeal, the decision is still considered a landmark for civil rights advocates mounting similar challenges in state courts across the country.

    Reporter Jennifer Chambers of The Detroit News has covered the case since it was filed four years ago, and has visited dozens of schools over the past few years to observe learning conditions for the city’s students. What’s changed since local control was restored in 2017, following more than seven years of state control of the Detroit district.

    Why are the district superintendent and school board chief urging Gov. Gretchen Whitmer to settle the case What might that settlement look like in terms of funding and resources for schools? Chambers, who has reported from Detroit for 20 years, also offers suggestions for building trust among sources and covering equity issues more broadly. In addition she shares how the switch to remote learning is going for local schools and students, and what it was like to be on furlough from work when the court decision was handed down.

    • 23 min
    “There Are No Invisible Children:” Erica Green of The New York Times

    “There Are No Invisible Children:” Erica Green of The New York Times

    Few, if any, education reporters are tackling tougher issues right now than Erica Green of The New York Times, whose stories often share a common theme of focusing on the unmet needs of marginalized students. She discusses recent coverage, including how school cafeteria workers in Baltimore are feeding an entire neighborhood, concerns about a potential federal waiver that would let districts pause services for students with disabilities, and a rare look inside a juvenile detention center where young adults are being left largely unprotected from COVID-19.
     
    What trends has she noticed in how school districts are responding to the novel coronavirus pandemic? What’s changed in her on-the-ground reporting techniques in the midst of the crisis? Why does she describe herself as a “no surprises” journalist, and how has that served her well in “speaking truth to power” — including to U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos? And what story ideas does she encourage other education reporters to explore as schools struggle in the wake of the pandemic?

    • 30 min
    Higher Ed Goes Remote

    Higher Ed Goes Remote

    With most colleges and universities forced to close campuses in response to the COVID-19 outbreak, postsecondary learning has moved online for millions of students. Doug Lederman, the co-founder and editor of Inside Higher Ed, discusses the fallout of the shift and its potential long-term implications, especially for postsecondary institutions that were already in precarious financial straits. Along with student mental health, what topped a list of concerns among college presidents in a recent survey? Why should education reporters distinguish “remote learning in a pandemic” from less-harried efforts to expand online classes? And what are some ways to approach remote sourcing when the usual shoe-leather approaches are now off-limits?

    • 23 min
    Self-Care for Journalists 101

    Self-Care for Journalists 101

    Education reporters, like everyone else, are struggling to cope with the stress and many day-to-day challenges of life during a pandemic. At the same time, they're working hard under difficult conditions to chronicle the impact on students, schools and families. and pitching in on broader coverage for their newsrooms. What do journalists need to know about protecting their mental health and physical well-being during this challenging time? Kimina Lyall, the deputy director of the Dart Center Asia Pacific, a project of the Columbia Journalism School, shares insights from her 15-year reporting career, which includes covering mass shooting events and surviving the 2004 tsunami in Thailand. Now in the final stage of her training to be a psychologist in her hometown near Melbourne, Australia, Lyall shares strategies for handling challenging assignments, how to set healthy boundaries -- especially when working remotely -- and how to recognize signs that someone might need additional help or support.

    • 28 min
    COVID-19 and New York City Schools

    COVID-19 and New York City Schools

    With more than 1.1 million K-12 students, New York City’s public schools are dealing with the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on a massive scale. While district officials scramble to close the technology gap and get computers to students who need them, teachers are getting a crash course in the “do's and don’ts” of remote instruction. Patricia Willens, the news editor for youth and family reporting at WNYC, the city’s flagship public radio station, discusses her team’s approach to covering the crisis, and what they have discovered in their reporting. How is the crisis exacerbating existing inequities in the city’s public schools? What are the challenges parents and students face with remote learning at home? What do these radio reporters pack in their “go bags” for trips into the community? How can reporters enrich their stories with diverse voices even when “shelter in place” orders make traditional shoe-leather techniques impossible? And what are story ideas for education reporters in the short-term and in the coming months?

    • 20 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
16 Ratings

16 Ratings

Steve_TheStrip ,

Outstanding discussions, invaluable!

Emily Richmond is extremely knowledgeable and her guests are among the nation's top journalists reporting about education issues. The length is just right, too -- about 13-15 minutes. Just enough to get a sense of the topics, many of which you wouldn't have heard about anywhere else. Check it out and get smarter.

LFWDP ,

Unique conversations with journalists

The EWA Radio podcast has carved out a unique niche interviewing journalists about stories on education, one of the issues that matters most to people. Host Emily Richmond is always well-prepared and gets the best from her guests. The topics they tackle range widely, everything from finding high-quality child care to coping with college costs. Definitely worth subscribing!

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