68 episodes

We invite you to join us on EM Pulse Podcast™ as we delve into current topics in Emergency Medicine through fascinating cases, interviews with authors of groundbreaking research, and discussion with clinical experts in adult and pediatric EM. Let’s learn together from these amazing people who are changing the landscape of clinical care.

EM Pulse Podcast™ UC Davis Emergency Department

    • Medicine
    • 4.9 • 83 Ratings

We invite you to join us on EM Pulse Podcast™ as we delve into current topics in Emergency Medicine through fascinating cases, interviews with authors of groundbreaking research, and discussion with clinical experts in adult and pediatric EM. Let’s learn together from these amazing people who are changing the landscape of clinical care.

    The Alexandria Plan

    The Alexandria Plan

    Ever wondered how the specialty of Emergency Medicine came about? We take it for granted that we have emergency departments staffed 24/7 with board certified EM physicians, but this wasn’t always the case. Join us for a trip down memory lane, with the help of Dr. Brian Zink. Dr. Zink collected stories and audio recordings from some of the founders of our specialty. He shares several of these with us to give us a feel for what it was like in those early days. 



    What did you think of this episode? We’d love your feedback. Connect with us on social media @empulsepodcast, or through our website, ucdavisem.com.



    ***Please rate us and leave us a review on iTunes! It helps us reach more people.***



    Hosts:



    Dr. Julia Magaña, Associate Professor of Pediatric Emergency Medicine at UC Davis



    Dr. Sarah Medeiros, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine at UC Davis



    Guests:



    Dr. Brian Zink, Professor of Emergency Medicine and Senior Associate Dean for Faculty and Faculty Development at the University of Michigan



    Resources:



    Anyone, Anything, Anytime - a History if Emergency Medicine (2nd edition) by Dr. Brian Zink



    In Memory of Dr. Peter Rosen, a Founder of Emergency Medicine. 



    George Podgorny, MD, Advocate and  Architect  of Emergency Medicine 



    Rosen P. The biology of emergency medicine. JACEP. 1979;8(7):280-283. doi:10.1016/s0361-1124(79)80226-9



    Emergency Physicians Gear up for Specialty Approval. Originally published in Hospital Practice in October, 1975

    ***

    Thank you to the UC Davis Department of Emergency Medicine for supporting this podcast and to Orlando Magaña at OM Audio Productions for audio production services.

    • 30 min
    Residency Recruiting in the Time of COVID

    Residency Recruiting in the Time of COVID

    It’s that time of year again - residency recruiting season! But this year, things will look very different, thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic. We talk with Dr. David Barnes, Emergency Medicine Residency Program Director at UC Davis, about some of the challenges for both applicants and residency leadership. He also offers some sound advice for students applying in EM - most importantly, be yourself and be flexible; this format is new to everyone. 



    Do you have questions or concerns about the residency application and interview process this year?  Send us your thoughts on social media @empulsepodcast, or through our website, ucdavisem.com.



    ***Please rate us and leave us a review on iTunes! It helps us reach more people.***



    Hosts:



    Dr. Julia Magaña, Associate Professor of Pediatric Emergency Medicine at UC Davis



    Dr. Sarah Medeiros, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine at UC Davis



    Guests:



    Dr. David Barnes, Professor of Emergency Medicine and Emergency Medicine Residency Program Director Equity at UC Davis



    Resources:



    UC Davis Emergency Medicine Residency Program



    Hammoud MM, Standiford T, Carmody JB. Potential Implications of COVID-19 for the 2020-2021 Residency Application Cycle [published online ahead of print, 2020 Jun 3]. JAMA. 2020;10.1001/jama.2020.8911. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.8911



    ACEP Concensus Statement on the 2020-2021 Residency Application Process for U.S. Medical Students Planning Carter’s in Emergency Medicine in the Main Residency Match

    ***

    Thank you to the UC Davis Department of Emergency Medicine for supporting this podcast and to Orlando Magaña at OM Audio Productions for audio production services.

    • 13 min
    “Less Lethal” Crowd Control

    “Less Lethal” Crowd Control

    “Less Lethal” Crowd Control



    You may have heard of “non-lethal” or “less lethal” weapons used for crowd control. These include things such as pepper spray, tear gas, bean bags, and rubber bullets. But, while these may be less lethal than standard weapons and bullets, they still cause serious harm and even death. As protests raged across the U.S. this summer, we have seen many injuries associated with these methods. Dr. James Chenoweth, an emergency physician and toxicologist, joins us to explain what these weapons are and what kind of damage they can cause, as well as some tips for treating these injuries. Dr. Kara Toles worked as a street medic in the recent protests in Sacramento. She shares her experience, including key supplies she carries in her pack, and what it’s like to be in the middle of a peaceful protest turned violent. As physicians, we should be concerned about the physical injuries these crowd control methods cause, as well as the psychological effects.  



    Have you treated patients with injuries from so called non lethal crowd control methods?  Share your thoughts and experiences with us on social media @empulsepodcast, or through our website, ucdavisem.com.



    ***Please rate us and leave us a review on iTunes! It helps us reach more people.***



    Hosts:



    Dr. Julia Magaña, Associate Professor of Pediatric Emergency Medicine at UC Davis



    Dr. Sarah Medeiros, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine at UC Davis



    Guests:



    Dr. Kara Toles, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine and Director of Diversity Equity and Inclusion for the Department of Emergency Medicine at UC Davis



    Dr. James Chenoweth , Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine and Medical Toxicologist at UC Davis



    Resources:



    This Week in Toxicology Tear Gas, Pepper Spray, and Rubber Bullets: A Primer



    Penetrating Injuries from “Less Lethal” Beanbag Munitions. Correspondence in the New England Journal of Medicine, by Dr. Kristofor A. Olson et al. August 14 2020. 



    Sacramento Street EMS



    Sacramento Anti Police-Terror Project

    ***

    Thank you to the UC Davis Department of Emergency Medicine for supporting this podcast and to Orlando Magaña at OM Audio Productions for audio production services.

    • 36 min
    MIS-C—What do we do???

    MIS-C—What do we do???

    I hope you learned as much as I did from Dr. Nakra. It makes a lot of sense as we figure this illness out to think about MIS-C in kids with other features such as GI symptoms, rashes early in the illness AND to pursue evaluation in those with fever of 5 days without any other symptoms. If you find elevated inflammatory markers with a history of COVID exposure or in areas with high prevalence admit. Also if they are hypotensive give fluids cautiously, consider pressers pearlier than you would in other kids because you might have cariogenic shock.  Transfer to a pediatric center with multi-disciplinary resources. I don’t know about you but that is something new for me and will change the way I approach my kiddos on my next shift. 



    Show notes:



    MIS-C—What do we do???



    Has MIS-C changed the way you approach a febrile child? I know I struggle to understand this new disease. Fortunately Dr. Natasha Nakra, a Pediatric Infectious Disease Specialist, joins us this month to clarify what we know about MIS-C, when we should think about it, and what we should do.



    Have you seen a child with MIS-C? What tipped you off? Send us your answer via on social media, @empulsepodcast, or through our website, ucdavisem.com.



    ***Please rate us and leave us a review on iTunes! It helps us reach more people.***



    Host:



    Dr. Julia Magaña, Assistant Professor of Pediatric Emergency Medicine at UC Davis



    Guest:



    Dr. Natasha Nakra, MS Associate professor of pediatrics, Pediatric Infectious Disease Specialist at UC Davis 



    Resources: 



    Nakra, N.A.; Blumberg, D.A.; Herrera-Guerra, A.; Lakshminrusimha, S. Multi-System Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C) Following SARS-CoV-2 Infection: Review of Clinical Presentation, Hypothetical Pathogenesis, and Proposed Management. Children 2020, 7, 69.



    CDC Multi-inflammatory syndrome: for healthcare providers.



    https://www.cdc.gov/mis-c/hcp/index.html

    • 22 min
    From Ally to Advocate

    From Ally to Advocate

    Welcome back to EM Pulse. It’s no secret that black, indigenous, and people of color are underrepresented in medicine and academics. This is largely due to structural or institutionalized racism, which is a massive topic for another time. While it may be difficult to swallow, white people have benefited from this system, and many of us are still learning just how our my privilege afforded us. This can be unnerving and even embarrassing at times, as we start to really appreciate the struggle our BIPOC friends and colleagues have faced, and continue to face. We want to be allies; we want to do something.



    This month’s heartbeat is geared specifically to people who want to be better allies in this fight. It is absolutely crucial to listen to voices of people of color and follow their lead, but, as we will discuss, it is not our non-white colleagues’ job to educate us! With that in mind, our guest is Dr. Colleen Sweeney, a Professor of biochemistry and molecular medicine at the UC Davis School of Medicine, who recently gave a talk on taking allyship to the next level. 



    We are still learning to be better advocates and welcome your comments and feedback. Connect with us on social media,  @empulsepodcast, or through our website, ucdavisem.com.



    ***Please rate us and leave us a review on iTunes! It helps us reach more people.***



    Host:



    Dr. Sarah Medeiros, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine at UC Davis



    Guest:



    Dr. Colleen Sweeney, Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine at the UC Davis School of Medicine



    Resources:







     



    Ibram X. Kendi, author of How to be an Anti-Racist, Stamped from the Beginning: the Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America, and others books



    Tervalon M, Murray-García J. Cultural humility versus cultural competence: a critical distinction in defining physician training outcomes in multicultural education. J Health Care Poor Underserved. 1998;9(2):117-125. doi:10.1353/hpu.2010.0233



    Award winning documentary From the Community to the Classroom



    AAMC MedEdPortal: Antiracism in Medicine Collection



    AAMC: Racism and Health



    UC Davis Office of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion

    ***

    Register now for the 17th annual Emergency Medicine Update: Hot Topics 2020, November 3rd through 7th at the Fairmont Kea Lani in Maui!



    Thank you to the UC Davis Department of Emergency Medicine for supporting this podcast and to Orlando Magaña at OM Audio Productions for audio production services.

    • 20 min
    Surge – Part 2

    Surge – Part 2

    In the first half of our episode on surge, we heard first hand accounts of how COVID-19 impacted EDs and ICUs in hard hit areas. In the second half, we explore emergency preparedness at a more macro level. Experts, Dr. John Rose and Dr. Dan Colby, join us to discuss how county emergency medical services, hospital administration, and emergency departments are planning for a potential surge of COVID-19 cases. As new infections and hospitalizations are rising across most of the country, they offer some practical advice to help us manage the surge. .



    Has your hospital experienced a COVID surge? How did you handle it, or how are you preparing for a potential surge? Share your thoughts and experiences with us on social media @empulsepodcast, or through our website, ucdavisem.com. And stay tuned for Part 2, when we’ll talk practical preparedness strategies from EMS, administration, and ED operations points of view - coming July 3rd!



    ***Please rate us and leave us a review on iTunes! It helps us reach more people.***



    Hosts:



    Dr. Julia Magaña, Associate Professor of Pediatric Emergency Medicine at UC Davis



    Dr. Sarah Medeiros, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine at UC Davis



    Guests:



    Dr. John Rose, Professor of Emergency Medicine at UC Davis and Medical Director for Yolo Emergency Medical Services Agency (YEMSA)



    Dr. Daniel Colby, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine and member of the ED Clinical Operations Team at UC Davis



    Resources:



    California Hospital Association Emergency Preparedness Hospital Incident Command System (HICS)



    Pediatric Overflow Planning Contingency Response Network (POPCoRN)



    *********************************************************************************************



    Register now for the 17th annual Emergency Medicine Update: Hot Topics 2020, November 3rd through 7th at the Fairmont Kea Lani in Maui!



    Thank you to the UC Davis Department of Emergency Medicine for supporting this podcast and to Orlando Magaña at OM Audio Productions for audio production services.

    • 22 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
83 Ratings

83 Ratings

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Fantastic Podcast

This is one of the best medical podcasts out there. Love the cutting edge topics and the engaging format. A must listen

Tnics ,

Great content. Great audio and production quality.

Truly one of the best produced podcasts in the medical space, with amazing content from great hosts covering a breadth of topics with fantastic guests.

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Excellent

... great speakers w great audio. I like the no wasted space in time, always succinct & informative.
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