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Podcast interviews with genius-level (top .1%) practitioners, scientists, researchers, clinicians and professionals in Cancer, 3D Bio Printing, CRISPR-CAS9, Ketogenic Diets, the Microbiome, Extracellular Vesicles, and more.

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Finding Genius Podcas‪t‬ Richard Jacobs

    • Medicine
    • 4.9 • 372 Ratings

Podcast interviews with genius-level (top .1%) practitioners, scientists, researchers, clinicians and professionals in Cancer, 3D Bio Printing, CRISPR-CAS9, Ketogenic Diets, the Microbiome, Extracellular Vesicles, and more.

Subscribe today for the latest medical, health and bioscience insights from geniuses in their field(s).

    Corona Virus Reactions and Vaccine Ramifications - An In-Depth Examination of the Covid-19 Pandemic with Dr. Ronald Brown

    Corona Virus Reactions and Vaccine Ramifications - An In-Depth Examination of the Covid-19 Pandemic with Dr. Ronald Brown

    Does sodium chloride play a role in how and why our bodies contract viruses? Research may show that its presence can be a significant indicator. Listen up to learn:
    How vaccines are developed in real-time The difference between infection fatality rates and case fatality rates What happens to mRNA after it is used in the vaccine Ronald B. Brown, Ph.D., joins the conversation to discuss his research into the Covid-19 virus and how it interacts with our bodies.
    It can bring more harm than good by overreacting to early Covid-19 reports before understanding and defining statistics. By making hasty decisions on the advice of the World Health Organization, there may be lasting repercussions.
    The human body has a "virome," similar to the gut microbiome, which plays a role in maintaining overall health in the body. By making viruses internally, our bodies produce certain products at different times in the year, affecting our health in different ways.
    Search for Dr. Ronald B. Brown on Google Scholar for more information.

    Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: apple.co/30PvU9C

    • 53 min
    Avoiding the Dangers of Mechanical Ventilation: An Alternative Life-Saving Oxygen Therapy

    Avoiding the Dangers of Mechanical Ventilation: An Alternative Life-Saving Oxygen Therapy

    Over 50 percent of people who are put on mechanical ventilation don’t survive. But for many, there is another option. Dr. Gutierrez explains.
    Press play to learn:
    How the use of high-flow nasal cannulas significantly reduces the concern of aerosolizing the COVID-19 virus and infecting healthcare workers Why it can be so dangerous, if not fatal, to place people on mechanical ventilators How high-flow nasal cannulas can be used as a replacement for mechanical ventilation in treating a number of diseases Dr. Eddy Gutierrez is a critical care specialist at Baptist Medical Center in Florida who joins the show to share his firsthand experience in treating COVID-19 patients, and the benefits of replacing mechanical ventilation with high-flow nasal cannulas.
    When COVID-19 first hit, Dr. Gutierrez and his colleagues were shocked by the high level of mortality and difficulty caring for those with the virus—especially since they always prioritized staying on the cutting edge of medicine and medical technology.
    Initially, the conventional treatment for COVID-19 was to deliver oxygen to patients by putting them on mechanical ventilators. Dr. Gutierrez says it quickly became clear that there weren’t going to be enough ventilators, which led to the use of a life-saving technology called a high-flow nasal cannula.
    And it really is life-saving, considering that the mortality rate of those who need to be intubated and put on a mechanical ventilator is so high, and the complications so numerous.
    The high-flow nasal cannula is placed over the face of the patent and delivers a much higher flow of oxygen to the patient than conventional cannulas, but at the same time allows the patient to continue eating, communicating with loved ones on the phone or video chat, and even walking around in their hospital rooms.
    Someone who is on a ventilator, in contrast, is unable to move, eat, or even breathe on their own, and may experience deadly consequences. 
    Find Dr. Gutierrez on Twitter and Instagram @eddyjoemd and check out his podcast, Saving Lives.

    Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: apple.co/30PvU9C

    • 42 min
    The Brain Cancer Microenvironment and Genetics - An Examination of the Mechanics of Cancer with Xi Huang

    The Brain Cancer Microenvironment and Genetics - An Examination of the Mechanics of Cancer with Xi Huang

    How can cancer cells be understood through a lens other than strictly biological? Mechanical factors may serve a function in the genes never before understood.

    Press play to learn:
    How normal cells respond to stressors on the body If organs as a whole change in response to the presence of cancer How an encapsulated tumor affects surgery Xi Huang, assistant professor in the department of molecular genetics at the University of Toronto, discusses his research on the mechanical aspects of cancer cells.
    Cancer tissue in an organ can alter the rigidity of the tissue around it. A more rigid environment can be conducive to forming new growths of cancer if the pathways in the area allow for it.
    Different stiffnesses in tissue can give clues into the stem cells of that specific cancer. If tumors of the same kind vary in stiffness, they may behave differently or have different impacts on the surrounding area.
    To learn more, visit http://www.moleculargenetics.utoronto.ca/faculty/2015/7/2/xi-huang.

    Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: apple.co/30PvU9C

    • 35 min
    Cancer as a New Cellular Species?—Tough Questions About Cancer, Answered by Professor Henry Heng

    Cancer as a New Cellular Species?—Tough Questions About Cancer, Answered by Professor Henry Heng

    “Cancer…should be defined as a different system, almost like a different animal…cancer as a new system or new cellular species…is very provocative and some people find it hard to accept,” says Professor Henry Heng.
    Tune in to learn more and discover:
    Why some cancers return after primary tumor resection At what point cancer becomes its own “life form” Why genetic heterogeneity might be considered one of cancer’s most powerful strategies for growth and survival Professor Heng is part of the Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics at Wayne State University School of Medicine.
    He joins the show to provide his knowledge and insight on a handful of challenging, compelling questions about cancer. These include whether cancer should be considered as a separate life form, how cancer cells differ genetically from host cells, how cancers and viruses behave in fundamentally different ways, how viruses can cause cancer, why the distinction between cancer stem cells and regular cancer cells is a significant one, and so many more.
    Visit https://www.genetics.wayne.edu/faculty/henry-heng to learn more.

    Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: apple.co/30PvU9C

    • 52 min
    Modern Apothecary Living and Sustainability - A Deep Dive into Living From the Land with Dr. Nicole Apelian

    Modern Apothecary Living and Sustainability - A Deep Dive into Living From the Land with Dr. Nicole Apelian

    How can you begin foraging for your own food? Many resources are available to help you take the first step. Listen in to learn:
    Is foraging for all needs viable globally? If plants are able to communicate Where new research into plant medicines is leading Herbalist and anthropologist, Dr. Nicole Apelian drops in shares her vast experience of living by foraging from the land all over the world.
    Cultures globally have been using the land surrounding them as their grocery stores and pharmacies throughout history. Necessities and holistic remedies can be found in abundance in many biomes and landscapes.
    By collecting information from herbalists, insights into health and the environment can be gained worldwide. Plant medicines may be able to give hope to people with ailments never previously thought to be treatable.
    Visit nicoleapelian.com for more information.

    Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: apple.co/30PvU9C

    • 35 min
    The Nose Knows: Disease-Sniffing Dogs (and Humans?)

    The Nose Knows: Disease-Sniffing Dogs (and Humans?)

    Can you smell disease? Believe it or not, you can, and pretty reliably at that. The problem is, you aren’t good at describing and quantifying what you smell, and definitely not at “diagnosing.” Aromyx is a company that’s doing something incredibly unique to circumvent this problem, while utilizing scent detection for all it’s worth.
    Press play to learn:
    How “smelling” something is actually an act of detecting distinct chemical metabolite signatures from tissues in the body By what percentage dogs have been shown to more accurately and sensitively detect prostate cancer than the status quo, FDA-approved test How the olfactory system could eventually hold the key to therapeutics for a range of diseases  Olfaction (the sense of smell) has been used for hundreds of years to detect disease—even the ancient Greeks practiced it. Josh Silverman is the CEO of Aromyx, a company that’s taking full advantage of this powerful sense.
    So, how are they doing it?
    By developing validated clinical assays for diagnosing disease states, using the same scent and taste receptors that are in your nose and tongue. By cloning those receptors and putting them in a format that be used in the lab to measure responses from individual receptors, Aromyx is effectively hijacking the same information that goes from your nose to your brain when you smell or taste something, and putting it in an objective, readable, and quantifiable format.
    They’re taking a powerful “subjective” experience, and making it a powerful objective measurement of chemical metabolites which indicate the presence of certain diseases. And, the level of detection is orders of magnitude beyond any electronic sensors or other technology currently in existence.
    So far, Aromyx has used this technology to detect prostate cancer, pancreatic cancer, and malaria, and they know that the potential for much wider diagnostic capabilities is well within reach.
    Silverman dives into all the details of this and more.
    Tune in, and check out https://www.aromyx.com/ to learn more.  

    Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: apple.co/30PvU9C

    • 27 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
372 Ratings

372 Ratings

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