53 episodes

Fork U(niversity)
Not everything you put in your mouth is good for you.

There’s a lot of medical information thrown around out there. How are you to know what information you can trust, and what’s just plain old quackery? You can’t rely on your own “google fu”. You can’t count on quality medical advice from Facebook. You need a doctor in your corner.

On each episode of Your Doctor’s Orders, Dr. Terry Simpson will cut through the clutter and noise that always seems to follow the latest medical news. He has the unique perspective of a surgeon who has spent years doing molecular virology research and as a skeptic with academic credentials. He’ll help you develop the critical thinking skills so you can recognize evidence-based medicine, busting myths along the way.

The most common medical myths are often disguised as seemingly harmless “food as medicine”. By offering their own brand of medicine via foods, These hucksters are trying to practice medicine without a license. And though they’ll claim “nutrition is not taught in medical schools”, it turns out that’s a myth too. In fact, there’s an entire medical subspecialty called Culinary Medicine, and Dr. Simpson is certified as a Culinary Medicine Specialist.

Where today's nutritional advice is the realm of hucksters, Dr. Simpson is taking it back to the realm of science.

Fork U with Dr. Terry Simpson Terry Simpson

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.8 • 77 Ratings

Fork U(niversity)
Not everything you put in your mouth is good for you.

There’s a lot of medical information thrown around out there. How are you to know what information you can trust, and what’s just plain old quackery? You can’t rely on your own “google fu”. You can’t count on quality medical advice from Facebook. You need a doctor in your corner.

On each episode of Your Doctor’s Orders, Dr. Terry Simpson will cut through the clutter and noise that always seems to follow the latest medical news. He has the unique perspective of a surgeon who has spent years doing molecular virology research and as a skeptic with academic credentials. He’ll help you develop the critical thinking skills so you can recognize evidence-based medicine, busting myths along the way.

The most common medical myths are often disguised as seemingly harmless “food as medicine”. By offering their own brand of medicine via foods, These hucksters are trying to practice medicine without a license. And though they’ll claim “nutrition is not taught in medical schools”, it turns out that’s a myth too. In fact, there’s an entire medical subspecialty called Culinary Medicine, and Dr. Simpson is certified as a Culinary Medicine Specialist.

Where today's nutritional advice is the realm of hucksters, Dr. Simpson is taking it back to the realm of science.

    Rice and Fruit or Carnivore

    Rice and Fruit or Carnivore

    Rice and Fruit or CarnivoreThe rice diet successfully treated malignant hypertension. Today, we have medications that treat malignant hypertension. Before the 1940s, there were no drugs available to treat this disease, resulting in death from untreated malignant hypertension within six months.  Despite the best medical care available, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt died from this disease.
    History of the Rice DietWalter Kempner developed the rice diet to treat malignant hypertension. For example, failing kidneys would be given a reprieve with a diet low in sodium and protein. Then removal of saturated fat would allow some recovery of the heart.
    In a disease that had 100 percent death in six months, Kempner's results were amazing. For example, in Kempner’s original cohort of 192 people, only 25 patients died.  In addition, 107 patients showed significant improvement (from 200/112 mm Hg to 149/96 mm Hg) with the diet. Equally important, heart size decreased in 66 of 72 patients. Moreover, cholesterol was reduced in 73 of 82 patients. Finally, retinopathy improved or disappeared completely in 21 of 33 patients.
    "Therapeutic results are little short of miraculous," noted an editorial in the New England Journal of Medicine.
    The Rice DietPatients were first hospitalized. The diet consisted of white rice, sugar, fruit, fruit juices, vitamins and iron. Total calories were 2,000 with 20 grams of protein and 150 mg of sodium.
    Kempner kept careful records of his patients. Reporting success and failure is a key to academic transparency. Finally, the ability to reproduce the data in other centers provided the final key to Kempner's work.
    Contrast the Carnivore DietThe carnivore diet is popular among young, buff men whose living is made by promoting and coaching this diet. They sell the diet based on classic marketing techniques used for overweight patients.
    Lose weight without tryingNo need to log your foodEat as much as you wantHunger isn't an issue
    Marketing phrases used by hucksters for years to trap people unhappy about their weight.
    No Science in the Carnivore DietThe carnivore diet relies on anecdotes, not evidence. Testimonials rule Facebook and YouTube sites. There are no publications about the diet. Finally, many in the carnivore community push against medicine. Conspiratorial thinking is strong, with phrases like this:
    Doctors want you to be sickThe Medical Community wants to push pillsVegetables have anti-nutrients
    Try to raise a concern about how this diet would increase the risk of heart disease, and they double down with misinformation. They will deny the evidence showing that high cholesterol leads to heart attacks and strokes. Or make the claim that if you are "metabolically healthy," you don't need to worry about cholesterol.
    No Academic ResearchersThere are no academic research scientists following people trying the carnivore diet.
    That means there is no transparency about the results. In addition, there is no accountability for any bad results.
    Those who promote the diet include Paul Saladino, a physician who doesn't see patients and makes his income selling supplements.
    The Liver King, who doesn't follow the diet, was caught using performance-enhancing drugs.
    Shawn Baker is an orthopedic-trained surgeon who lost his medical license and makes his money promoting the carnivore diet. The New Mexico Medical Board ordered the "voluntary and permanent...

    • 13 min
    Grains on the Mediterranean Diet

    Grains on the Mediterranean Diet

    The Benefits of Whole Grains in Your DietI want to take you back in time. While we talk about the Mediterranean diet not being a diet of culture but a pattern of eating – it still had its origins in the Mediterranean.
    The original Mediterranean diet was described as far back as 500 BC in the Ilead. The ancient Greeks ate whole grains, fruits, vegetables, pulses, and a bit of fish. Red meat was rare.
    While red meat may not have been a dietary staple for the Ancient Greeks, it was consumed during feasts, festivals, and special occasions.
    Cows were considered sacred gods, like Zeus, and their slaughter was for religious ceremonies and consumed during feasts
    The majority of the population received protein from fish, poultry, legumes, and whole grains.
    The First OlympicsThis was the diet of the first Olympians, as well as the Romans. Ancient Greeks worshiped the body, as you can see from the statues, as well as our language.
    We get the word gym from the Greek word “gymnasion," which translates to a place to exercise naked. But those gyms not only had a place to train but also schools, where literature, philosophy, math, and music were taught, as well as a social gathering place.
    We also get Diet from the Greeks, which originates from “diaita,” meaning the “way of life” or a manner of living. The Greeks had a balanced approach to health and well-being, emphasizing diet, exercise, and the mind.
    Gym bros and bro science were yet to be invented.
    Ancient GrainsCould those Olympians of old who ate diets filled with whole-grain cereals have been wrong? Or could it be that those grains of the past were different from today’s grains?
    If you’ve ever been on a “low carb” diet, one of the first food groups you eliminate are grains.
    As you dutifully got rid of the last bit of joy in your life, you feel it was the cost to have your weight drop.
    You might have thought – "Grains are evil."
    Low Carb Life Without GrainsEating burgers without the bun, breakfast without toast, no pastries, no bread, no pasta, no rice, and you were losing weight. Lots of confirmation bias.
    Oh those heady early days of a low carb diet, losing weight, feeling better, maybe even noticing cholesterol improved. Hard to sustain though, and did you ever get tired of steak?
    Finding Joy in the Mediterranean DietNow you come here and find the best diet is the Mediterranean diet. Lots of peer reviewed literature to support it.
    Then you wondered what in grains was evil. The first easy thought was that it all breaks down to glucose, and glucose is evil.
    Unless you know biochemistry and realize no, that’s not it. Your body runs on glucose.
    It's the GlutenAnd maybe you read about celiac disease and gluten as its trigger. Maybe some blogger convinced you that wheat in America is filled with gluten, and this is the problem.
    Unable to sustain a low-carb diet, you return to the joy of the morning pastry or dessert, all the while thinking grains are what caused the weight to return.
    Now you come to the Mediterranean Diet, and whole grains, not refined grains, are on the menu.
    Still, you are suspicious, and you think – maybe it was the gluten.
    Celiac DiseaseOr what happens if you come to the Mediterranean diet and have Celiac disease and gluten causes horrific issues?
    But should we all avoid gluten? And can we have a Mediterranean diet if we must be gluten-free?
    Should the ancient Greeks become Carnivores instead of those grizzly men who are on a diet now associated with the healthiest people on planet Earth?
    Clearly not. Eating too much red meat is associated with increasing heart disease and cancer, while the Mediterranean diet is associated with less heart disease and cancer.
    Carnivore's TakeCarnivores like pointing to the ancient...

    • 13 min
    Secrets to Cooking Fish

    Secrets to Cooking Fish

    Learn to Cook FishFish is not only a healthy option but also a versatile ingredient that can be transformed into a myriad of mouthwatering dishes. Whether you're a seafood aficionado or looking to expand your culinary repertoire, mastering the art of cooking fish can elevate your cooking skills to new heights. In this article, we'll explore the techniques and recipes to create delicious fish dishes that will impress even the most discerning palates.
    Cooking Methods:Grilling: Grilling fish over an open flame adds a smoky flavor and beautiful charred marks. Brush the fish with oil to prevent sticking, and cook for a few minutes on each side until opaque and flaky.Baking: Baking fish in the oven is a simple and foolproof method. Place seasoned fish fillets on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and bake at 375°F (190°C) for 10-15 minutes, depending on the thickness of the fish.Pan-Searing: Pan-searing fish in a hot skillet creates a crispy exterior while keeping the inside moist and tender. Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat, then add the fish and cook for 3-4 minutes per side until golden brown.Steaming: Steaming fish is a healthy cooking method that preserves its delicate flavor and texture. Place seasoned fish fillets in a steamer basket over boiling water and steam for 6-8 minutes until cooked through.
    Delicious Fish Recipes:Now that you're familiar with the basics of preparing and cooking fish let's explore some mouthwatering recipes to try at home:
    Lemon Herb Grilled Salmon: Marinate salmon fillets in a mixture of lemon juice, olive oil, garlic, and fresh herbs. Grill over medium heat for 4-5 minutes per side until charred and cooked through. Serve with a squeeze of fresh lemon juice.Baked Cod with Garlic Butter: Place cod fillets in a baking dish and top with a mixture of melted butter, minced garlic, lemon zest, and chopped parsley. Bake in the oven for 15-20 minutes until flaky and tender.Pan-Seared Sea Bass with Mango Salsa: Season sea bass fillets with salt, pepper, and paprika. Sear in a hot skillet for 3-4 minutes per side until golden brown. Serve with a refreshing mango salsa made with diced mango, red onion, jalapeno, cilantro, and lime juice.
    For more great recipes, see terrysimpson.com.

    • 10 min
    Health Benefits of Fish Consumption

    Health Benefits of Fish Consumption

    Health Benefits of Fish ConsumptionFish consumption has been linked to various health benefits due to its rich nutritional profile.  The health benefits of fish consumption include cardiovascular health, brain function, and well-being. Because fish are a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients, they are an important part of a balanced diet.
    Fish, the Most Ancestral FoodFish has long been recognized as a valuable source of essential nutrients beneficial for human health. Seafood is a staple part of the diet across different cultures and regions.  Since most of the first human communities were coastal, fish were a common source of food.
    Cardiovascular Health Exceeds RiskRegular fish intake reduces the risk of cardiovascular diseases, such as coronary heart disease and stroke (Mozaffarian & Rimm, 2006).  That study showed that the benefits of fish intake exceed the potential risks. Even for women of childbearing age, the benefits of modest fish intake, excepting a few selected species, also outweigh the risks.  The heart health effect comes from the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) found abundantly in fatty fish species (Kris-Etherton et al., 2002). These fatty acids exert anti-inflammatory, antiarrhythmic, and vasodilatory effects, lowering blood pressure and triglyceride levels and reducing the formation of blood clots (Calder, 2015).
    Brain FunctionFish consumption has also been associated with improved cognitive (brain) function and a reduced risk of brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. The omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA play a crucial role in brain health (Gómez-Pinilla, 2008). Epidemiological studies have consistently shown a positive correlation between higher fish consumption and better memory (ref). Moreover, research suggests early-life exposure to seafood has long-term brain benefits and decreases age-related cognitive decline (Wurtman et al., 2009).
    Nutrient Profile, Such as Vitamin DBut omega-3 fatty acids are not the only benefit of eating fish. Fish are also a rich source of various essential nutrients vital for human health. Vitamin D, in particular, is naturally abundant in fatty fish and plays a crucial role in bone health, immune function, and mood regulation (Holick, 2007).  These include high-quality protein, vitamins (such as vitamin D and B-complex vitamins), and minerals (such as selenium, iodine, and zinc) (Kris-Etherton et al., 2002). Furthermore, the bioavailability of these nutrients from fish is superior to other dietary sources, including supplements.  Thus, fish consumption is an efficient means of meeting nutritional requirements (Rosell & Appleby, 2006).
    Fish FarmsAquaculture, the farming of fish and aquatic organisms, has undergone significant advancements in recent years, leading to improvements in sustainability, efficiency, and product quality. Fish Farms have had significant problems in the past.  In the last fifteen years, there has been an improvement in environmental management strategies and sustainable farming practices.
    Those practices have changed my mind about seafood. Consequently, you can now buy quality farm-raised seafood, which adheres to the high standards of any food. Hence, I now recommend some...

    • 15 min
    Reducing Dementia with Diet

    Reducing Dementia with Diet

    Three Great DietsThe Mediterranean diet, the DASH diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension), and the MIND diet (Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay) are all great eating patterns. Each diet focuses on different aspects of health.
     
    Mediterranean DietThe Mediterranean diet comes from the traditional dietary patterns of countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea, such as Greece, Italy, and Spain. High in the consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, seeds, legumes, olive oil, fish, and moderate amounts of poultry, dairy, and red wine. Shown to decrease the risk of heart disease and cancer and to improve longevity.
    DASH DietDiscussed in last week's podcast (ref). DASH (Dietary approach to stop hypertension) was developed to prevent and manage hypertension (high blood pressure). Focuses on increasing intake of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, and low-fat dairy products while limiting sodium, saturated fats, and cholesterol.
    MIND DietDeveloped by researchers at Rush University Medical Center as a hybrid of the Mediterranean and DASH diets, with a focus on brain health and reducing the risk of neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease. It also emphasizes the consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, olive oil, fish, poultry, and beans while limiting the intake of red meat, butter/margarine, cheese, pastries/sweets, and fried/fast foods.
     Three Diets are Branches of the Same TreeThe Mediterranean, DASH, and MIND diets share some common elements. All focus on whole foods and plant-based sources of nutrients. The Mediterranean diet emphasizes health and longevity. While the DASH diet targets hypertension and cardiovascular health. Finally, the MIND diet specifically supports brain health to reduce the risk of neurodegenerative diseases.
    1. Rush Memory and Aging Project:A study conducted by researchers at Rush University Medical Center followed over 900 older adults for an average of 4.5 years. Findings showed that individuals who closely adhered to the MIND diet had a substantially lower risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, with a reduction in risk ranging from 21% to 53%, depending on the level of adherence. (ref )
    2. Columbia University Medical Center Study:Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center examined the dietary habits of over 1,000 participants. Individuals who closely followed the MIND diet had a 53% lower risk of developing Alzheimer's disease than those with low adherence to the diet.
    3. Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI):The ADNI study found that adherence to the MIND diet was associated with better cognitive performance and a reduced rate of cognitive decline over time.
    4. Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses:Several systematic reviews and meta-analyses have summarized the findings of multiple studies investigating the association between the MIND diet and dementia risk.  Overall, these reviews reveal that adherence to the MIND diet is associated with a significant reduction in Alzheimer's disease and dementia.
    5. Mechanisms of Action:Components of the MIND diet, such as leafy greens, berries, nuts, whole grains, fish, olive oil, and poultry, have been linked to improved cognitive function and a lower risk of dementia.
    More research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the protective effects of the MIND diet.  Current evidence suggests that...

    • 13 min
    DASH, The Best Diet You've Never Heard Of

    DASH, The Best Diet You've Never Heard Of

    Abstract:The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet is a widely recognized dietary pattern designed to lower blood pressure and promote cardiovascular health. I will attempt to provide an in-depth review of the DASH diet, its origins, key principles, health benefits, and potential limitations. It also explores the scientific evidence supporting its efficacy and applicability in various populations. Furthermore, this paper discusses practical considerations for adopting the DASH diet and its potential future developments in the field of nutrition and health.
    1. IntroductionThe DASH diet, or Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, is a dietary plan primarily developed to combat hypertension (high blood pressure). DASH has since gained recognition for its broader health benefits. Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, including heart disease and stroke. Therefore, the DASH diet is essential to reducing these health risks.
    2. Origins and DevelopmentThe National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) developed the DASH diet in a study known as the DASH-Sodium Study. The primary objective of the DASH-Sodium study was to investigate the effect of dietary patterns on blood pressure, in particular, the effects of sodium intake. Researchers aimed to design a diet that could effectively lower blood pressure without medication. The DASH diet emerged from this study as a dietary pattern rich in nutrients and low in sodium, saturated fat, and cholesterol.
     3. Key Principles of the DASH DietThe DASH diet emphasizes the consumption of nutrient-rich foods while limiting the intake of sodium, saturated fats, and cholesterol. Key principles of the DASH diet include:
     High Consumption of Fruits and Vegetables: The diet encourages individuals to consume a variety of fruits and vegetables, providing essential vitamins, minerals, fiber, and antioxidants.Lean Protein Sources: Lean proteins like poultry, fish, and plant-based options such as beans, lentils, and tofu are recommended to replace high-fat animal proteins.Whole Grains: The DASH diet emphasizes whole grains like brown rice, whole wheat, oats, and quinoa, which are rich in fiber and nutrients.Dairy: Low-fat or fat-free dairy products are included to provide calcium and protein without excess saturated fat.Nuts, Seeds, and Legumes: These foods are encouraged as sources of healthy fats, fiber, and plant-based protein.Limited Sweets and Sugary Beverages: The DASH diet restricts the consumption of sugary foods and beverages, reducing the intake of added sugars.Sodium Restriction: The diet recommends limiting sodium intake to 2,300 milligrams per day (or 1,500 milligrams for individuals with hypertension, certain chronic conditions, or those at high risk).
    4. Health Benefits of the DASH DietThe DASH diet offers a range of health benefits beyond blood pressure reduction:
    Lowering Blood Pressure: Numerous studies have shown that the DASH diet can effectively lower blood pressure, particularly in individuals with hypertension.Cardiovascular Health: The diet is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease, stroke, and other cardiovascular conditions due to its focus on heart-healthy nutrients and reduced saturated fat intake.Weight Management: The DASH diet can help weight loss and weight management due to its emphasis on nutrient-dense, low-calorie foods.Improved Lipid Profile: The diet can lower levels of LDL cholesterol (bad cholesterol) and improve HDL cholesterol (good cholesterol), further reducing the risk of heart disease.Diabetes Management: The DASH diet may help individuals with diabetes manage blood sugar levels, as it encourages a balanced intake of carbohydrates, fiber, and protein
     
    5. Scientific...

    • 11 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
77 Ratings

77 Ratings

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FACTS!

Great, reliable source of information to improve your health.

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I love and appreciate this gift!

Ohio! ,

To short

Love the info. Would like them long enough to do a task or drive home instead of changing every 8-12 minutes. These are more like clips

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