165 episodes

This podcast is produced by pharmacy faculty to supplement study material and provide relevant drug and professional topics. We're hoping that our real-life clinical pearls and discussions will help you stay up-to-date and improve your pharmacy knowledge.

HelixTalk - Rosalind Franklin University's College of Pharmacy Podcast Sean P. Kane, PharmD; Khyati Patel, PharmD

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.9 • 583 Ratings

This podcast is produced by pharmacy faculty to supplement study material and provide relevant drug and professional topics. We're hoping that our real-life clinical pearls and discussions will help you stay up-to-date and improve your pharmacy knowledge.

    151 - Deep Dive into Diltiazem: Pharmaceutics, Medicinal Chemistry, the FDA Orange Book, and More!

    151 - Deep Dive into Diltiazem: Pharmaceutics, Medicinal Chemistry, the FDA Orange Book, and More!

    In this episode, we “deep dive” into diltiazem, describing its most important drug facts, pharmacology and medicinal chemistry, pharmaceutics, AB compatibility, and important medication safety issues.
    Key Concepts
    Diltiazem is a non-dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker (CCB). This type of CCB reduces both heart rate and blood pressure whereas dihydropyridine CCBs only reduce blood pressure. Diltiazem has numerous dosage forms (IV, immediate release tablets, and extended-release products). Extended-release products are always dosed once or twice daily. Historically there were a significant number of extended-release capsules with a variety of brand names and AB-compatibility. Today, only a few branded products still exist in the US market (Cardizem CD, Cartia XT, Cardizem LA, Tiazac, Taztia XT). The FDA Orange Book describes “AB” compatibility, which outlines whether one formulation is therapeutically equivalent to another formulation. Depending on state law, pharmacists can use AB compatibility codes to automatically substitute formulations without notifying the prescriber. The numerous dosage forms of diltiazem is a medication safety issue. Remember that immediate release diltiazem is always dosed TID/QID (3-4 times per day) whereas extended-release formulations are always dosed once daily. A twice-daily extended-release product was previously on the market but has since been discontinued.

    • 34 min
    150 - Keep on Going Strong: A Reflection of 150 HelixTalk Episodes Through the Years

    150 - Keep on Going Strong: A Reflection of 150 HelixTalk Episodes Through the Years

    In this episode, the hosts of the HelixTalk reflect back on the history and making of HelixTalk to commemorate the 150th episode. We review each of our three favorite episodes and with a brief reflection on the episode content. We have come a long way from where we began and it is all thanks to the wonderful listeners and contributors who have a common thing in mind: a quest and thirst for knowledge!
    Links to Previous Episodes:
    #50 - Three shocking recommendations from CHEST 2016 that will blow your mind (https://www.rosalindfranklin.edu/academics/college-of-pharmacy/helixtalk/helixtalk-episode-50--three-shocking-recommendations-from-chest-2016-that-will-blow-your-mind/) #29, 30, and 31 - Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (https://www.rosalindfranklin.edu/academics/college-of-pharmacy/helixtalk/helixtalk-episode-29--therapeutic-drug-monitoring-i/, https://www.rosalindfranklin.edu/academics/college-of-pharmacy/helixtalk/helixtalk-episode-30--therapeutic-drug-monitoring-ii/, https://www.rosalindfranklin.edu/academics/college-of-pharmacy/helixtalk/helixtalk-episode-31--therapeutic-drug-monitoring-iii/) #111 - The Basics of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors for Non-Oncology Healthcare Providers (https://www.rosalindfranklin.edu/academics/college-of-pharmacy/helixtalk/helixtalk-episode-111-the-basics-of-immune-checkpoint-inhibitors-for-non-oncology-healthcare-providers/) #51 - Pharmacists to the rescue! (https://www.rosalindfranklin.edu/academics/college-of-pharmacy/helixtalk/helixtalk-episode-51--pharmacists-to-the-rescue/) #124 - The ABCs of EUAs: Understanding FDA Emergency Use Authorizations (https://www.rosalindfranklin.edu/academics/college-of-pharmacy/helixtalk/helixtalk-episode-124-the-abcs-of-euas-understanding-fda-emergency-use-authorizations/) #123 - Dr. Rosalind Franklin: Beyond Photo 51 (https://www.rosalindfranklin.edu/academics/college-of-pharmacy/helixtalk/helixtalk-episode-123-dr-rosalind-franklin-beyond-photo-51/) #137 - It’s Time for PBM Reform: How PBMs Have Hurt Pharmacies and Increased Drug Costs (https://www.rosalindfranklin.edu/academics/college-of-pharmacy/helixtalk/helixtalk-episode-137-it-s-time-for-pbm-reform-how-pbms-have-hurt-pharmacies-and-increased-drug-costs/)

    • 46 min
    149 - Replenishing the Missing Element: A Complete Review of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    149 - Replenishing the Missing Element: A Complete Review of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    In this episode, we will cover a complete overview of definition, diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of iron deficiency anemia (IDA).
    Key Concepts
    Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common type of nutritional anemia. The most common risk factors are insufficient dietary intake, malabsorption, and increased requirement states like pregnancy or blood loss. Serum ferritin serves as the most confirmatory lab test for diagnosis of IDA. A low serum ferritin level usually indicates the presence of IDA. Other iron studies and CBC can be helpful in diagnosing IDA as well.  Generally oral iron therapy is a well-accessible, inexpensive, safe, and effective approach for IDA treatment. Almost all PO options are equally effective and safe. Gastrointestinal adverse effects are common and can sometimes limit further dosing.  Intravenous iron therapy is generally reserved for patients who are refractory or intolerant to PO treatment, have malabsorption of PO iron therapy, or have other health conditions such as chronic kidney disease, cancer, upcoming surgery, etc. Available IV options are equally effective and selection of an agent depends on insurance coverage, formulary inclusion, patient preference for test dose, frequency of dosing, etc. 

    • 58 min
    148 - Grit, Determination, and Entrepreneurship: A Pharmacist’s Career Path to Starting an Independent Pharmacy

    148 - Grit, Determination, and Entrepreneurship: A Pharmacist’s Career Path to Starting an Independent Pharmacy

    In this episode, we interview Hetal Patel, PharmD and RFUMS COP Alumni, regarding her career path that eventually led her to open Lebanon Family Pharmacy in TN in 2021. We discuss the challenges and opportunities of starting a new independent pharmacy and what the future of independent pharmacy looks like.
    Key Concepts
    Starting a new, independent pharmacy requires substantial planning 8 to 12 months before the pharmacy’s doors even open. New pharmacy owners need to consider a variety of factors such as location, type of building, a business plan with financial analysis, a variety of building and pharmacy inspections, paperwork and government approvals, and so much more. PSAOs (pharmacy services administrative organizations) can be helpful, especially for new pharmacy owners, to serve as a liaison between the pharmacy and PBMs (pharmacy benefit managers) to negotiate reimbursement contracts. As owners gain more experience, there may be financial advantages to not using PSAOs and negotiating with PBMs directly. Companies like “Health Mart” have a franchise-like model to provide products, services, documentation, policies and procedures, and more to independent pharmacies. These companies reduce the workload associated with running a pharmacy so that the pharmacy owners can focus their time and attention on the business itself and providing exceptional customer service. There are a number of challenges to independent pharmacies – some of these challenges involve PBMs (DIR fees and MAC pricing) as well as unrestricted dispensaries in primary care clinics. References
    Lebanon Family Pharmacy. https://lebanonfamilypharmacy.com/

    • 52 min
    147 - Key Recommendations from the 2022 AHA/ACC/HFSA Heart Failure Guidelines

    147 - Key Recommendations from the 2022 AHA/ACC/HFSA Heart Failure Guidelines

    In this episode, we review new updates and key concepts from the 2022 AHA/ACC/HFSA Guideline for the Management of Heart Failure. This guideline is newly published (April 2022) and is a full update of the 2013 guidelines and the 2017 focused update for heart failure.
    Key Concepts
    Heart failure is classified as HFrEF (heart failure with reduced ejection fraction 40%), HFmrEF (ejection fraction 41% to 49% with increased LV filling pressures), and HFpEF (preserved ejection fraction >= 50% with increased LV filling pressures). Most drug therapy recommendations are similar for HFrEF, HFimpEF, and HFmrEF whereas HFpEF therapies are different. The 2022 AHA/ACC/HFSA heart failure guidelines now recommend SGLT2 inhibitors, such as dapagliflozin and empagliflozin, in patients with HFrEF, HFmrEF, and HFpEF. The 2022 AHA/ACC/HFSA heart failure guidelines continue to prefer ARNi, such as sacubitril/valsartan (Entresto), over ACE inhibitors and ARBs in patients with HFrEF. Based on the PARAGON-HF trial, ARNi is also recommended in those with HFpEF albeit with a weak recommendation. Avoiding excessive dietary sodium is reasonable to reduce congestive symptoms in patients with heart failure; however, guidelines do not recommend a specific maximum intake nor does data support clinical outcome benefit with dietary sodium restriction. References
    Heidenreich PA, Bozkurt B, Aguilar D, et al. 2022 AHA/ACC/HFSA Guideline for the Management of Heart Failure: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Joint Committee on Clinical Practice Guidelines [published online ahead of print, 2022 Apr 1]. Circulation. 2022;101161CIR0000000000001063. doi:10.1161/CIR.0000000000001063. https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIR.0000000000001063 Ezekowitz JA, Colin-Ramirez E, Ross H, et al. Reduction of dietary sodium to less than 100 mmol in heart failure (SODIUM-HF): an international, open-label, randomised, controlled trial. Lancet. 2022;399(10333):1391-1400. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(22)00369-5

    • 48 min
    146 - New Drugs for Bad Bugs: Six Newer Antibiotics for Multidrug Resistant Pathogens

    146 - New Drugs for Bad Bugs: Six Newer Antibiotics for Multidrug Resistant Pathogens

    In this episode, we discuss six newer antibiotics that target multidrug resistant gram negative bacteria with Dr. Christie Bertram, PharmD, BCIDP. We review common resistance mechanisms, particularly to carbapenems, and highlight the current role in therapy for the following antibiotics: ceftolozane/tazobactam (Zerbaxa®), ceftazidime/avibactam (Avycaz®), meropenem/vaborbactam (Vabomere®), imipenem/cilastatin/relebactam (Recarbrio®), cefiderocol (Fetroja®), and eravacycline (Xerava®). Key Concepts
    Ceftolozane/tazobactam (Zerbaxa®) is primarily used for multidrug resistant Pseudomonas; it does not cover carbapenemase-producing organisms and (despite the tazobactam) needs metronidazole for intra-abdominal anaerobic coverage. Ceftazidime/avibactam (Avycaz®) is primarily used to cover CRE (Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacterales) but also has activity for many other gram negatives except Acinetobacter. Meropenem/vaborbactam (Vabomere®) has similar coverage to Avycaz® but may provide coverage for certain KPCs (Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase). Vaborbactam does not restore activity for meropenem-resistant Pseudomonas. Imipenem/cilastatin/relebactam (Recarbrio®) has similar coverage to Avycaz® and Vabomere®; true niche in therapy is not yet well defined. Cefiderocol (Fetroja®) uses a unique mechanism to enter gram negative bacteria and has a broad spectrum of activity against carbapenemase-producing bacteria and many other multidrug resistant gram negatives. It has no gram positive activity. Eravacycline (Xerava®) is a tigecycline-like tetracycline with a broad spectrum of activity against carbapenemase-producing gram negative, gram positive, an anaerobic bacteria EXCEPT it lacks coverage for Pseudomonas. References
    Yusuf E, Bax HI, Verkaik NJ, van Westreenen M. An Update on Eight "New" Antibiotics against Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria. J Clin Med. 2021;10(5):1068. Published 2021 Mar 4. doi:10.3390/jcm10051068 CDC Antibiotic Resistance Threats in the United States, 2019 report. https://www.cdc.gov/drugresistance/pdf/threats-report/2019-ar-threats-report-508.pdf

    • 39 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
583 Ratings

583 Ratings

mpazdr1 ,

Great review podcast

I love this podcast for great clinical review of meds and treatments for specific disease states. Keep up the good work!

Zorcron ,

Informative and Digestible

This is a great podcast for reviewing clinical topics I’m rusty on since pharmacy school and it makes new literature so digestible.

lysdur ,

Informative

This is exactly what I have been searching for. I am a retail pharmacist that has been out of school for a few years now and I have been looking for something extra to keep me informed. This podcast is informative and very well explained. I also appreciate the recap at the end. Thank you for sharing your knowledge!

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