49 episodes

Astronomy 161, Introduction to the Solar System, is the first quarter of
a 2-quarter introductory Astronomy for non-science majors taught at The
Ohio State University. This podcast presents audio recordings of
Professor Richard Pogge's lectures from his Autumn Quarter 2007 class.
All of the lectures were recorded live in 1000 McPherson Laboratory on
the OSU Main Campus in Columbus, Ohio.

Astronomy 161 - Introduction to Solar System Astronomy Richard Pogge

    • Education
    • 4.9 • 75 Ratings

Astronomy 161, Introduction to the Solar System, is the first quarter of
a 2-quarter introductory Astronomy for non-science majors taught at The
Ohio State University. This podcast presents audio recordings of
Professor Richard Pogge's lectures from his Autumn Quarter 2007 class.
All of the lectures were recorded live in 1000 McPherson Laboratory on
the OSU Main Campus in Columbus, Ohio.

    Welcome to Astronomy 161 for Autumn Quarter 2007

    Welcome to Astronomy 161 for Autumn Quarter 2007

    Welcome to the Astronomy 161 Lecture Podcasts. This is a brief message
    from me explaining the podcasts, and welcoming new and old listeners.
    University. Lectures will begin on Wednesday, 2007 Sept 19, and run
    through Friday, 2007 Nov 30. New lectures will appear shortly before
    6pm US Eastern Time each day there is a regular class. Recorded 2007
    Sep 19 in 4037 McPherson Lab on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State
    University.

    Lecture 01: Introduction to Astronomy 161

    Lecture 01: Introduction to Astronomy 161

    What is Astronomy? What is Science? What is the course all about?
    Brief introductory remarks after going over course mechanics on the
    first day of Astronomy 161 for Autumn Quarter 2007. Recorded 2007 Sep
    19 in 1000 McPherson Lab on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State
    University.

    Lecture 02: Astronomical Numbers

    Lecture 02: Astronomical Numbers

    What are our units of measure in astronomy? To begin our exploration of
    astronomy, we first need to develop a common language for notating large
    numbers, and introduce the basic units of length, mass, and time that we
    will use throughout the quarter. This lecture is a quick review of
    scientific notation and the metric system. For measuring the vast
    distances in astronomy, we need to introduce two special units: the
    Astronomical Unit for interplanetary distances, and the Light Year for
    interstellar distances. We end with a discussion of mass and weight,
    and the distinction drawn in physical measurements that differs (a
    little) from everyday usage. Recorded 2007 Sep 20 in 1000 McPherson Lab
    on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

    Lecture 03: The Starry Night

    Lecture 03: The Starry Night

    What are the constellations? We will review the most basic feature of
    the night sky, the 6000 visible stars sprinkled about the sky, and
    introduce the idea of constellations, reviewing their history and uses
    by various cultures. Recorded 2007 Sep 21 in 1000 McPherson Lab on the
    Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

    Lecture 04: Measuring the Earth

    Lecture 04: Measuring the Earth

    What is the shape and size of the Earth? This lecture traces historical
    ideas about the shape of the Earth, from ancient ideas of a Flat-Earth
    to Aristotle's compelling demonstrations in the 3rd century BC that the
    Earth was a sphere. We then discuss two famous classical measurements
    of the circumference of the Earth by Eratosthenes of Cyrene in the 3rd
    century BC and Claudius Ptolemy in the 2nd century AD. Recorded 2007
    Sep 24 in 1000 McPherson Lab on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State
    University.

    Lecture 05: Mapping Earth & Sky

    Lecture 05: Mapping Earth & Sky

    Where are we? Where is someplace else? And how do I get there from
    here? These are questions we need to answer both on the Earth and in
    the sky to assign a location to a place or celestial object on the
    surface of a sphere. This lecture includes a review of angular units
    and the terrestrial system of latitude and longitude on the spherical
    Earth. We then define the Celestial Sphere, with its Celestial Equator
    and Poles, and begin to define an analogous coordinate system on the
    sky. An important wrinkle is that what part of the sky we see at any
    given time depends on both where we are on the Earth, and what date/time
    it is. This gives us the elements of the coordinate system we will need
    to begin our exploration of motions in the sky in the next lectures.
    Recorded 2007 Sep 25 in 1000 McPherson Lab on the Columbus campus of The
    Ohio State University.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
75 Ratings

75 Ratings

V. Regretful ,

Most informative way to fall asleep ever

I’ve been using this for years and it’s my everything. Even after all this time, I’ll still rewind to the point where I fell asleep.

saperlo ,

The very best of all science podcasts

These lectures really have set the top standard for science podcasts out there, of any discipline. They are packed with accessible information that will often introduce complexity without losing the audience. I have learned so much through these and have now even bought the textbook to just keep it going.
So grateful to professor Pogge for his brilliant and accessible teaching and for putting these podcasts out there.

Mike Kubo ,

Excellent

Truly one of the best podcasts I’ve listened to.

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