185 episodes

Posptartum Depression is real. And it's only part of the story. We dig in to ALL of the stuff that no tells you about, but you NEED to know. Dr. Kat, Psychologist and specialist in perinatal mental health, interviews moms, dads, experts and advocates about how to cope, manage and recover from perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. We talk about postpartum depression, postpartum anxiety and SO MUCH MORE! We get real. We get honest. We put on our stigma crushing boots and address the realities of the transition to motherhood and parenthood. Learn about it before you find out about it the hard way! You don't have to suffer! www.momandmind.com

Mom & Mind Katayune Kaeni, Psy.D.

    • Mental Health
    • 4.9, 136 Ratings

Posptartum Depression is real. And it's only part of the story. We dig in to ALL of the stuff that no tells you about, but you NEED to know. Dr. Kat, Psychologist and specialist in perinatal mental health, interviews moms, dads, experts and advocates about how to cope, manage and recover from perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. We talk about postpartum depression, postpartum anxiety and SO MUCH MORE! We get real. We get honest. We put on our stigma crushing boots and address the realities of the transition to motherhood and parenthood. Learn about it before you find out about it the hard way! You don't have to suffer! www.momandmind.com

    Postpartum Depression, Anxiety, and OCD - Alisa's Story

    Postpartum Depression, Anxiety, and OCD - Alisa's Story

    Perinatal mood and anxiety disorder can leave you feeling lost, alone, and confused by the symptoms. This is why it’s so important that we hear personal stories of others that show us we are not alone.
    Alisa Pastecki is a Sales Executive for a network equipment and services provider that works with telecommunications companies all over the US and Canada. She lives in Batavia, NY--just outside of Buffalo--with her husband Doug, two-year-old daughter Gloria, and their dog Lily. The family spends as much time outdoors as possible, enjoying hiking and camping. After the birth of her daughter, Alisa suffered from postpartum depression, anxiety, and OCD. She has since realized just how important it is to raise our voices in the fight against maternal health stigmas, and she wants to help normalize PMADs for moms in her community.
    Show Highlights:
    How depression and OCD tendencies began for Alisa even before she was pregnant Trying to conceive, an endometriosis diagnosis, surgery, and plans for IVF An unexpected pregnancy just in the nick of time led to insensitive comments by a nurse that escalated Alisa’s anxiety about the pregnancy With an easy pregnancy, Alisa’s daughter was born full-term, but Alisa’s anxiety kept escalating with the pressure of her doubt in second-guessing every decision Midwife and doula plans, induced labor, painful procedures, and a C-section What Alisa wishes she had done differently Why Alisa had never been so scared before as she was during her C-section Problems with breastfeeding and weight loss for her baby How Alisa felt about being constantly bombarded with a black and white approach to each obstacle she faced Problems with OCD, disconnected feelings, and anxiety in the first few postpartum weeks How the anger and rage set in for Alisa and led to irrational fears about her daughter How intrusive thoughts began around three months postpartum How Alisa stumbled onto the PSI (Postpartum Support International) website and found helpful resources How Alisa found a therapist who let her know that she would be OK; now, two years later, she is still working with that therapist who provided her the tools and meds to change her life The difference that therapy and medications made in giving Alisa confidence as a new mom Lessons learned for Alisa: Many medical practitioners aren’t sufficiently educated on postpartum care, so you need to find a doctor who understands PMADs Reach out to peers and a support group who will honestly open up about the bad and ugly of the postpartum experience Be vocal and help break the stigma around mental health issues Resources:
    Alisa Pastecki  
     

    • 53 min
    182: Pediatricians' Important Role in Perinatal Mental Health

    182: Pediatricians' Important Role in Perinatal Mental Health

    We are constantly learning more about the importance of mental health and its impact on the overall health of parents, children, and the entire family. More and more clinicians are getting trained in perinatal mental health, which is exactly what is needed. In today’s show, we get a pediatrician’s perspective of stepping in to help new moms, even though their primary role is to support and care for the child.
    Dr. Natasha Sriraman is a pediatrician and Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Eastern Virginia Medical School. She’s an attending physician, researcher, wife, and mother. Her main areas of research include breastfeeding, postpartum depression, and health disparities. Natasha is a strong advocate who lobbies for breastfeeding support in the workplace and postpartum depression screening within the pediatric setting. She researches, publishes, and speaks around the country about postpartum depression and anxiety, breastfeeding, and the importance of the mother in the fourth trimester. When not working, Natasha enjoys running, boxing, yoga, traveling, reading, and going to the beach with her family. In this episode, Natasha shares her perspective, experience, and knowledge of being a pediatrician who incorporates perinatal mental health awareness and screening into her practice as well as how her own experience prompted her to become a lactation consultant. We’ll touch on how the added stress of COVID-19 is impacting families in receiving necessary care and how pediatricians can play an important role in perinatal mental health.
    Show Highlights:
    Natasha’s practice and focus on perinatal mental health and the “fourth” trimester, based on her experience and difficulties as a mom The unique opportunities that pediatricians have to engage with babies and mothers during the first year of a baby’s life and “bridge the gap” for families Why Natasha is screening moms even before the first six-week checkup for the baby The delicate balance for a pediatrician of navigating the issue of a mom’s mental health when the baby is your patient How to differentiate between normal “new mom nervousness” and postpartum depression and anxiety that requires help New worries from pregnant women and new moms in the time of COVID-19 Extra precautions in the doctor’s office during COVID-19: taking temperatures and wearing masks How Natasha navigates her work as a lactation consultant Why patients should never feel like they have to choose between breastfeeding and getting treatment for anxiety/depression The need for widespread education in perinatal mental health Natasha’s hopeful message: “It’s been wonderful to see moms achieve a level of comfort in talking to their physicians and pediatricians in the fourth trimester. One positive aspect of COVID-19 is increased access to virtual support groups.” Resources:
    Natasha.Mom.MD: Care For Kids, Empowerment for Moms
    Facebook: Natasha Mom MD
    Natasha Mom MD
     

    • 38 min
    181: Fathers and Perinatal Mental Health

    181: Fathers and Perinatal Mental Health

    We have the honor of hearing from Dr. Sheehan Fisher about new fathers, the transitions they may go through when a baby comes along, as well as the challenges and strengths that they may experience.
    There are quite a few gems in our talk today, one of which is how the role of fatherhood is changing and adapting to the times…AND thoughts about navigating that. Dr. Fisher’s take on these transitions is not to be missed. I’m sure you’ll want to share this with the fathers, men and partners of men in your life. PLEASE DO!
    We also discuss:
    - The spectrum of mood changes that fathers might experience postpartum, such as depression, anxiety, anger
    - how it affects them, what they might experience 
    - what their partners might notice 
    - Looking at the family as a system and how family members affect each other
    - What can they do? What kinds of support or therapy, available?
    - Coping suggestions
    - hopeful messages for fathers 
    Connect with Dr. Fisher:
    Twitter: @SheehanDFisher
    Facebook: @SheehanDFisher
    Instagram: @DrChefSheehan 
    Dr. Sheehan Fisher is a clinical psychologist and Assistant Professor at Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, with an appointment at Lurie Children’s Hospital.  His research and clinical interests focus on perinatal mental health, with a subspecialty in father’s mental health and role in the family. His aim is to understand the mechanisms that place mothers and fathers at risk for perinatal mood and anxiety disorders, and the effect of both parents' mental health on infant health outcomes. He also is passionate about increasing fathers' competence in the home and reconstructing views of masculinity.
    For this and all episodes, visit www.momandmind.com
    To join in the discussion and community, find us at 
    https://www.facebook.com/MomandMindPodcast/ 
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/MomandMindConnection/
     

    • 33 min
    180: There's More to My Postpartum Story

    180: There's More to My Postpartum Story

    My goal is for the show to be a mix of personal stories, expert interviews, information, and education. Even though my story isn’t usually at the forefront, I find that it’s powerful and meaningful to share my experiences, and that’s the focus of today’s episode. Join us!
    You know me as Dr. Kat, but my full name is Katayune Kaeni. I’m a psychologist, wife, and mother to two lovely humans. I’m perinatal mental health certified, and my entry into the world of perinatal mental health began ten years ago with the birth of my first child, my daughter. I’m proud of my children, and I look at this podcast as another beautiful creation that I’ve birthed into the world. Just like the motherhood journey, my four-year podcast journey has been full of many mistakes and lots of learning; we’ve covered many topics, but there is so much more to learn! To date, Mom & Mind is heard in 69 countries, with over 356,000 downloads and a horde of social media followers. Welcome to Episode 180!
    Show Highlights:
    For everyone with a perinatal mental health issue, there is always a story behind the pain Why and how my relationship with my body changed and began a different phase in my life How I knew at age 12 that I wanted to be a mental health counselor, even though I already was dealing with anxiety and depression In high school, a skiing accident left me with an ACL injury that required surgery, along with my first concussion In college, risk factors kept building as PMS brought panic attacks and more depression; over the years I tried doctors, diuretics, birth control pills, acupuncture, Chinese medicine, and energy healing In grad school, family stressors brought more depression and anxiety, and I met and married my husband; a biking accident led to my second concussion that wasn’t treated properly As I entered the world of employment, I suffered yet another concussion; other risk factors included anxiety, depression, being a highly sensitive person and a perfectionist, and then---my first pregnancy Because pregnancy brought me relief from PMS and hormonal craziness, I actually felt wonderful--better than I had in many years Ten years ago, in 2010, my daughter was born, and the problems began on Day 1 How I dealt with breastfeeding issues, poor sleep, and intense anxiety; the intrusive thoughts were overwhelming and embarrassing because of their sexual nature Why I never even told my husband how I was feeling--even a year into our daughter’s life As a psychologist, I didn’t want anyone to know that I was suffering, so I lied on a depression screen How I finally decided to make changes, and I started with learning more about perinatal mental health and helping others How getting past the shame, guilt, and embarrassment was a huge obstacle for me How I started accepting clients into my private practice and continued to learn more and more Today, I’m still triggered from time to time, but I can recognize the signs now better than before With my second child, I had similar experiences, but the problems were less intense because I knew what was happening How my PMS symptoms became worse and more difficult to manage after my two children were born How I’m taking measures to manage my mental health Why I want people to have a broader sense of perinatal mental health conditions My goal for myself is to learn to live with it well and have more opportunity for healing My healing isn’t complete, because life brings up things I have to deal with on a daily basis My goal with the podcast is to normalize the fact that we all struggle, and make it OK to reach out and get help Resources:
    Email me: hello@momandmind.com
    Find my website:  Mom And Mind 
     
     
     

    • 33 min
    179: Black Women Birthing Justice

    179: Black Women Birthing Justice

    Have you ever considered how the systemic and institutional racism, implicit bias and disempowerment of women might be played out with birth? This is especially true for Black women, many of whom are experiencing discrimination, bias, racism and/or poor care while pregnant, birthing or postpartum. Today’s show explores these dynamics, the findings of a research project and the recommendations that have come out of that research.  
    We are talking with Professor Chinyere Oparah and Dr. Sayida Peprah, who are part of the Black Women Birthing Justice collective. Today we are discussing some of the research they have done and the report called Battling over Birth. Highlights from our discussion include the power dynamics in the birthing environment for black women, history of sexual survivor issues and how that might impact the birthing experience, empowering Black women in the birth space and some glimpses into what the Battling over Birth report recommends. 
     
    Julia Chinyere Oparah is a social justice educator, collective leader, activist scholar, and experienced community organizer who has spent over two decades producing critical scholarship in the service of progressive social movements.  Oparah is Provost and Dean of the Faculty and professor of Ethnic Studies at Mills College, and she was educated at Cambridge University and Warwick University
     Oparah is the author of Other Kinds of Dreams: Black Women’s Organizations and the Politics of Organization, the only comprehensive history of the black women’s movement in Britain. Her most recent book, Birthing Justice: Black Women, Pregnancy and Childbirth, places Black women at the center of debates around childbirth and highlights their role in the emerging birth justice movement.
    Dr. Sayida Peprah became certified through DONA International Inc., as a Birth Doula and began assisting mothers professionally in their journey of pregnancy, childbirth and breastfeeding.  
    She is currently a Psychologist and founder and director of Diversity Uplifts, Inc. through which she regularly offers cultural competency, mental health and maternal mental health trainings and consultations throughout the US.  Dr. Sayida is also an active member of the Black Women Birthing Justice collective, promoting research, education and community-based services to positively transform birthing experiences in the Black community.
     
    Show Highlights:
    Black Women Birthing Justice: A collective of African-American Caribbean, and multi-racial women who are sharing about the negative experiences they’ve had in their maternal care and childbirth How a negative birth experience can be turned around with a great midwife and doula team How the actions that are being taken by medical providers are disempowering black women How BWBJ began in 2011 with a Research Justice project, with over 100 women being open and honest about their stories Battling Over Birth: a human rights report that unpacks the stories of those 100 women and how they found themselves in conflict with their medical providers Before the sharing circles, some of the women had no idea of what they had missed out on in their birth experiences The comparison with this topic and the sexual survivors of the Me Too movement, and how their birth experiences are re-triggering and re-traumatizing, with further victimization How doctors use fear-based coercion to get the women to do what THEY want The ramifications and implications for these women, along with the potential stress and trauma The opportunity to change the narrative and “do it differently” How to have empowerment in the birth experience, including how providers interact with you for physical exams during labor and birth How the mental health of these women is affected The ways we can make sure this doesn’t keep happening--”This doesn’t have to be normal.” How

    • 46 min
    Linet's Story: Healing from PPD and PPA

    Linet's Story: Healing from PPD and PPA

    Going through a postpartum mental health event can be a transformative experience. Many survivors feel inspired to change the course of their lives and careers and dedicate themselves to supporting and serving others. Such is the case of today’s guest, and her story is a fitting way to round out Maternal Mental Health Month. Join us!
    Linet Madeja-Bravo is a working mom, wife, and the proud daughter of Filipino immigrants. She lives in the Pacific Northwest and is Mommy to two-year-old Isabella. Professionally, Linet has worked for local government for almost a decade and is most passionate about serving those in her community that are most marginalized and furthest from opportunity. Overwhelmed by the unexpected realities of being a new mom, breastfeeding issues, and other life events, Linet decided to seek professional help at eight weeks postpartum. Linet’s experience with postpartum depression and anxiety ignited a passion for helping other new moms and families. She is also passionate about decreasing cultural stigma and reducing barriers to mental health support and resources for those who need it most. Linet continues to work through her postpartum depression and anxiety with a specialized therapist and shares her story as a way of healing. She also hopes to one day become professionally trained to become a therapist or support person who specializes in perinatal mood and anxiety disorders.
    Show Highlights:
    Linet’s story of always wanting to be a mom, getting pregnant soon after their marriage, and an easy pregnancy How she experienced anxiety about the birth process, but then felt overwhelming joy at her daughter’s birth As the difficulties began, Linet found that breastfeeding was the biggest contributor to her postpartum anxiety Why it was hard for Linet to know who to listen to At three days old, her daughter had to go to the hospital due to losing weight; she had to take formula and be treated for jaundice in the NICU How the nurses didn’t explain the problems and treatments to Linet, and she found out later her baby had been weighed incorrectly What Linet learned in the NICU stay: how to pump and how to wash bottles properly How Linet realized that breastfeeding and sleep were her biggest issues, along with an unexpected surgery for her daughter’s tongue-tie issue How LInet realized that everything she tried to control didn’t work out and made things worse How Linet took her daughter to different feeding specialists and therapists, later realizing she was being obsessive How Linet had random crying fits and felt guilty for her postpartum anxiety and suicidal thoughts The breaking point at eight weeks postpartum, when Linet went to the hospital with abdominal pain that turned out to be diverticulitis Why Linet saw a therapist to get help for the first time The unseen pressure in immigrant cultures about mental health How returning to Linet’s faith and her church community helped with her healing The hardest things in Linet’s journey Hopeful words from Linet: “You have everything you need to be a great parent. Your confidence in parenting will ebb and flow, and there will still be hard days. I’ve accepted that parenting is full of hard moments and new things. The most beautiful thing is that I’ve never felt such deep love, passion, and reward. Parents need to prioritize self-care and give themselves grace.”

    • 46 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
136 Ratings

136 Ratings

K@ysie ,

Thank you

I been feeling so lost and out of place with a lot of thought that are not me feeling sad anxious scared and so much more some day are great while others are terrible I’ve been feeling like I’m loosing my mind and going “crazy” I stumbled upon your podcast and I believe it was episode 183 I couldn’t hold back my tears just hearing that I’m not alone and completely out of it thank you so much i hear so much about ppd but never about anxiety and fear thank you

Hanoehdds ,

Thank you

Thank you Dr. Kat for your podcast. Episode 169 is my story . Hearing it made me feel so much better because even Though I went through therapy I always had the guilt that maybe I’m “over reacting “ . This podcast is amazing. I hope for using your podcast to help my continuous healing .

LifeAfterPostpartum ,

Thank You

Dr. Kat. Thank you for your stories you share to the world. I listen to your podcast/episodes and there’s ALWAYS part of me in all of them. Words can not appreciate how much I’m grateful for you.

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