30 episodes

Like a daily audio flash card. This podcast is intended to aid any medical professional preparing for an Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS) class. Each one-to-nine minute Flash Briefing-style episode covers one of the skills needed to recognize a stroke or cardiac emergency and work as a high-performing team to deliver quality care.
Listening to a tip-of-the-day for 14-30 days prior to a class will help cement core concepts that have been shown to improve outcomes in patients suffering a heart attack, cardiac arrest, or stroke. In addition to the chain of survival core concepts and ACLS algorithms, specific information needed to pass the written exam and megacode following the 2020 guidelines is presented.
Healthcare providers that are already ACLS certified may find listening a helpful reminder.
Disclaimer: This podcast is a supplement to your course's approved text book and videos - not a replacement. The information presented is for educational purposes only and is not medical advice. Medical professionals should follow their local laws, agency protocols, and act only within their scope of practice.

Pass ACLS Tip of the Day Paul Taylor

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.7 • 37 Ratings

Like a daily audio flash card. This podcast is intended to aid any medical professional preparing for an Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS) class. Each one-to-nine minute Flash Briefing-style episode covers one of the skills needed to recognize a stroke or cardiac emergency and work as a high-performing team to deliver quality care.
Listening to a tip-of-the-day for 14-30 days prior to a class will help cement core concepts that have been shown to improve outcomes in patients suffering a heart attack, cardiac arrest, or stroke. In addition to the chain of survival core concepts and ACLS algorithms, specific information needed to pass the written exam and megacode following the 2020 guidelines is presented.
Healthcare providers that are already ACLS certified may find listening a helpful reminder.
Disclaimer: This podcast is a supplement to your course's approved text book and videos - not a replacement. The information presented is for educational purposes only and is not medical advice. Medical professionals should follow their local laws, agency protocols, and act only within their scope of practice.

    Medication Review: Calcium Channel Blockers

    Medication Review: Calcium Channel Blockers

    Calcium is one of the ions that move across the cellular membrane during cardiac contraction and relaxation.
    The primary use of calcium channel blockers in ACLS is for the treatment of stable, narrow complex tachycardias refractory to Adenosine and to lower the blood pressure of ischemic stroke patients with severe hypertension.
    Use of calcium channel blockers for SVT refractory to Adenosine and A-Fib or A-Flutter with RVR.
    Contraindications of calcium channel blockers.
    Nicardipine use during the treatment of ischemic strokes.
    For more information on ACLS medications, tachycardia, or stroke check out the pod resource page at passacls.com.
    Connect with me:
    Website:  https://passacls.com
    @PassACLS on X (formally known as Twitter)
    @Pass-ACLS-Podcast on LinkedIn

    Give back - buy Paul a bubble tea here

    Good luck with your ACLS class!

    • 4 min
    Post-Arrest Care & Targeted Temperature Management (TTM)

    Post-Arrest Care & Targeted Temperature Management (TTM)

    The goal of CPR is to keep the brain and vital organs perfused until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) is achieved.
    Post-arrest care and recovery are the final two links in the chain of survival.
    Identification of ROSC during CPR.
    Initial patient management goals after identifying ROSC.
    The patient’s GCS/LOC should be evaluated to determine if targeted temperature management (TTM) is indicated.
    Patients that cannot obey simple commands should receive TTM for at least 24 hours.
    Monitoring the patient’s core temperature during TTM.
    Why we should cool unresponsive post-arrest patients.
    Patients can undergo EEG, CT, MRI, & PCI while receiving TTM.
    Connect with me:
    Website:  https://passacls.com
    @PassACLS on X (formally known as Twitter)
    @Pass-ACLS-Podcast on LinkedIn

    Give back - buy Paul a bubble tea here

    Good luck with your ACLS class!

    • 5 min
    Nitroglycerine Use in ACLS

    Nitroglycerine Use in ACLS

    Nitroglycerine is vasodilator that affects peripheral blood vessels and coronary arteries.
    Because of its widespread dilation effects on blood vessels, nitro can quickly lower a patient’s blood pressure, sometimes to the point of making a patient hypotensive.
    Assessment of vital signs prior to administering nitro is necessary to ensure patient safety.
    Indications for use of nitroglycerine.
    Nitroglycerine's contraindications & considerations for use.
    Effects of nitro on patients taking PDE inhibitors.
    Administration of nitroglycerine to patients with ischemic chest pain.
    Considerations for patients that took their home nitroglycerine.
    Monitoring patient's pain and vital signs after nitro administration.
    Connect with me:
    Website:  https://passacls.com
    @PassACLS on X (formally known as Twitter)
    @Pass-ACLS-Podcast on LinkedIn

    Give back - buy Paul a bubble tea here

    Good luck with your ACLS class!

    • 4 min
    Atrial Fibrillation or Flutter with RVR

    Atrial Fibrillation or Flutter with RVR

    In atrial fibrillation (A-Fib) and atrial flutter (A-Flutter) the electrical impulse for cardiac contraction is in the atria but isn't the normal pacemaker of the heart, the SA node.
    The ECG characteristics of A-Fib and A-Flutter.
    Recognition and treatment of unstable patients in A-Fib/Flutter with rapid ventricular response (RVR).
    Suggested energy settings for synchronized cardioversion of unstable patients with a narrow complex tachycardia.
    Team safety when cardioverting an unstable patient in A-FIB/Flutter.
    Adenosine’s role for stable SVT patients with atrial rhythms.
    Treatment of stable patients in A-Fib/Flutter with RVR.
    For other medical podcasts that cover narrow complex tachycardias, visit the pod resource page at passacls.com.
    Connect with me:
    Website:  https://passacls.com
    @PassACLS on X (formally known as Twitter)
    @Pass-ACLS-Podcast on LinkedIn

    Give back - buy Paul a bubble tea here

    Good luck with your ACLS class!

    • 5 min
    Tablets & Toxins: An H&T Reversible Cause of Cardiac Arrest

    Tablets & Toxins: An H&T Reversible Cause of Cardiac Arrest

    As an ACLS provider you do not need to be familiar with all of the different signs of various types of poisoning.  You should be able to obtain a history and know to order toxicology.
    The majority of toxins don’t have a specific antidote.  There are a few toxins for which we have emergency interventions and ACLS providers should be familiar with.
    Reviewing the patient's medical history for indicators that may lead us to suspect a tablet/toxin cause of cardiac arrest.
    Administration of Narcan for suspected narcotics overdose following the Opioid Associated Emergency algorithm.
    Other common ACLS Tablet Toxin scenarios with possible treatments.
    Medications commonly used to treat specific toxins that are regularly stocked on crash carts or carried in EMS med bags.
    ACLS providers that suspect a specific toxin should consult with their Pharmacy or call Poison Control for treatment directions.
    Poison Myths and Misconceptions Discussion
    Connect with me:
    Website:  https://passacls.com
    @PassACLS on X (formally known as Twitter)
    @Pass-ACLS-Podcast on LinkedIn

    Give back - buy Paul a bubble tea here

    Good luck with your ACLS class!
    The Pharmacist’s Voice ® Podcast: https://www.thepharmacistsvoice.com/podcast/

    • 4 min
    When To Use Which ACLS Algorithm

    When To Use Which ACLS Algorithm

    The ACLS algorithms are designed to make it easier to remember the key interventions we should deliver, and the order in which they should be delivered, to provide the best evidence-based care possible.
    Generally speaking, if there’s a change in a patient’s condition, we should ensure we’re using the correct algorithm.
    Three key points to remember when using ACLS algorithms:
    If a patient’s condition changes, we should do an assessment and use the algorithm that matches the patient’s current state.If an action was already done, we don’t need to repeat it.We only do actions that are clinically appropriate and within our scope of practice.
    Walk through of an example mega code scenario with explanations of when and why we change to a different ACLS algorithm. 
    Connect with me:
    Website:  https://passacls.com
    @PassACLS on X (formally known as Twitter)
    @Pass-ACLS-Podcast on LinkedIn

    Give back - buy Paul a bubble tea here

    Good luck with your ACLS class!

    • 8 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
37 Ratings

37 Ratings

Kim Newlove ,

Love the short episodes!

Pharmacist here. I like these short, informative episodes. The ones featuring drugs are most interesting to me, but my favorite episode had SONG recommendations for CPR…so you can set the pace. Unexpected and awesome! Great podcast!

Flixster usr ,

Great Review of ACLS, easy to understand

These episodes are a great daily review of individual ACLS topics. Accurate to the latest guidelines, easy to understand review for people who don’t have the occasion to practice ACLS regularly. Great info for experienced providers to help remember the details or prep for recert.

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