22 episodes

The aim of the podcast is to address common nursing questions and pitfalls with the help of doctors, nurses, and other healthcare staff.

Up My Nursing Game Annie

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.8 • 30 Ratings

The aim of the podcast is to address common nursing questions and pitfalls with the help of doctors, nurses, and other healthcare staff.

    #22 Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    #22 Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    What do you do when you notice that your patient has obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)? Hospitalist James Thomas MD PhD, discusses what OSA is, risk factors, its relationship with heart disease, and how to navigate management of OSA in the hospital setting.

    Click here to obtain one FREE hour of continuing education credit (1.00) from VCU Health.

    Buy tickets (virtual and in-person) for the upcoming Nurses PodCon in Nashville, TN on Nov. 20, 2021 here.

    • 46 min
    #21 Vancomycin and Oral Diabetic Agents

    #21 Vancomycin and Oral Diabetic Agents

    Listen in as I pick Victoria Arsenault's, PharmD, brain about two totally unrelated topics: vancomycin and oral diabetic agents.

    Learn more about emergency pharmacy at TILEmergencyPharmacist   *TIL= Today I Learned* Residents & students of @ChillaPharmD  posting the things they are learning on their emergency medicine pharmacy rotation.

    Use the promo code UMNG10 to get 10% off your order from Stoggles.

    Up My Nursing Game is partnering with VCU Health Continuing Education to offer FREE continuing education credits for registered nurses. Click here to obtain nursing credit (1.00).

    See the show notes at upmynursinggame.com.

    • 1 hr 1 min
    #20 Neutropenic Fever

    #20 Neutropenic Fever

    Neutropenic fever is a common hospital presentation for oncology patients. Dr. Darien Reed explains what neutropenic fever is, who is at risk for getting it, important assessment findings, and how we work these patients up.

    Use the promo code UMNG10 to get 10% off your order from Stoggles.

    Up My Nursing Game is partnering with VCU Health Continuing Education to offer FREE continuing education credits for registered nurses. Click here to obtain nursing credit (1.00).

    See the show notes at upmynursinggame.com.

    • 48 min
    #19 Interventional Radiology for Nurses

    #19 Interventional Radiology for Nurses

    Dr. Amrit Hansra, interventional radiologist, gives an overview of imaging modalities as well as key nursing takeaways for common IR procedures such as G-tubes, biliary drains, and nephrostomy tubes.

    Use the promo code UMNG10 to get 10% off your order from Stoggles.

    Up My Nursing Game is partnering with VCU Health Continuing Education to offer FREE continuing education credits for registered nurses. Click here to obtain nursing credit (1.00).



    ObjectivesListeners will be able to describe the differences between the various modes of medical imaging, including their advantages, limitations and indicationsListeners will be able to explain the the differences between PEG tubes and G-tubes, including how each are inserted as well as important difference in nursing managementListeners will be able to identify tunneled v. non-tunneled catheters and where to apply pressure after catheter removal.Listeners will be able to describe what biliary drains are, when they are indicated, and how nurses can effectively manage them

    • 57 min
    #18 Critical Care Transport

    #18 Critical Care Transport

    Patients require transportation for many reasons: to an increased level of care, a decreased level of care, a procedure, or for imaging. Katherine Stradling, BSN, RN, CCRN, TCRN discusses the science of transport, what it's like in the ambulance, and what bedside nurses can do to facilitate safe transport.



    ObjectivesListeners will be able to describe the difference between basic life support (BLS) transfer vs. critical care transport (CCT)Listeners will be able to explain the physiologic demands placed on patients during transportListeners will be able to describe how the sending nurse can prepare the patient for safe transportBLS v. ALS v. CCT


    Note: Protocols differ by county and organization


    BLS transport is for stable patients who will not require cardiac monitoring or medications during transport. It is typically a team of two or more EMTs. ALS transport includes a paramedic who can perform cardiac monitoring, chronic ventilators, and administer some medications. As Katherine explained, this set up is often unavailable, and thus patients who qualify for ALS transport often are transported by CCTCCT is a team including a critical care RN and two EMT. Their scope includes, but is not limited to cardiac monitoring, medication administration and titration, airway management. CCT is for patients who are not stable and will require intervention during transport.The Science of Patient Transport


    Increase O2 demandIncrease ICPNauseaIncreased sympathetic responseVariable BP changesHow the sending nurse can help facilitate safe transport


    Pre-medicate:this often means for pain and nauseaHave paperwork ready to goPull more meds than you think you need. Transportation is often delayed due to variable like traffic.Make room for the CCT crew to come in with their stretcherSpike hard-to-spike meds ahead of time (this is difficult to do on a bumpy ride!)Provide the receiving facility a complete and honest report. Make sure that they have all of the equipment the patient will need.Tip: If you're saying to yourself "the patient should be fine", just remember that the ambulance has finite supplies and team members. It's just the RN and EMTs out there on the road or in a helicopter, so give them more medications and supplies than you'd think and get your patient as stable as possible before they go.


    Relevant Links


    Hands to Hearts is a volunteer organization who believes that no one should die of treatable medical emergencies due to lack of education and resources. The organization helps build the first response system and offer life support courses in developing areas across rural Mexico. 

    • 54 min
    #17 What Happens During Dialysis?

    #17 What Happens During Dialysis?

    Dialysis isn't simply hooking up a patients to a machine for 3-4 hours. Veteran dialysis nurse, Jameisha Rogers RN, talks us through what happens during dialysis starting from reviewing orders to decannulation.

    Up My Nursing Game is partnering with VCU Health Continuing Education to offer FREE continuing education credits for registered nurses. Click here to obtain nursing credit (1.00).
    What does dialysis do?
    Dialysis eliminates waste, corrects electrolyte deficiencies, and corrects fluid imbalances.
    Inpatient v Outpatient Dialysis
    Inpatient
    Dialysis is often a part of a treatment plan for another medical issue, surgery or situationLabs are drawn for every dialysis timeOutpatient
    A patient’s labs may be drawn about 2-3x/monthFocuses more on the holistic care of the patient, including: Fluid statusElectrolyte balanceAnemiaMBD (mineral bone disease)VaccinationsCase managementDifferent Types of Dialysis Access
    Fistula: A surgical connection between a patient's own artery and vein.  Considered the "gold standard" for dialysis access.Graft: Similar to the AV fistula, a graft is a surgical connection between a patient's vein and artery, however the connection is made with a synthetic tube.CVC: A central line that terminates right above the right atrium. Due to the risk of infection, this is mostly used as temporary dialysis access until a fistula or graft has matured. A trialysis catheter falls into this category: it is a short-term catheter that is both a power PICC and dialysis access.Blood Pressure During Dialysis
    BP can increase or decrease based on the patient's baseline, what/when medications were taken prior to dialysis, and the dialysis machine settings.
    What is UF (ultrafiltration)?
    Ultrafiltration is the mechanism for which fluid is removed from the blood during dialysis. Ultrafiltration occurs when fluid passes across a semipermeable membrane (the dialyzer) to an area of lower pressure (the dialysate).
    A high UF volume means that a large volume of fluid will be removed from the patient. A high UF rate means that fluid will be removed from the patient quickly.
    Strategies to increase BP during dialysis?
    Decrease the UF rate (amount of fluid removed divided by the hours)ADD volumeMedication support such as albumin, midodrine, or vasopressersAnemia in ESRD
    The kidneys play a primary role in RBC production by secreting the hormone erythropoietin. Patients will often receive exogenous Epogen, iron, and vit D to help stimulate RBC production on dialysis days
    Miscellaneous
    Q: When should we be taking off dialysis dry dressing? 
    A: Around 4 hours after dialysis has ended (don't leave until the next day)
    Q: Why are patients tired afterwards?
    A: We are doing in 3-4 hours what the body does 24 hours a day -- fluid balance, removing toxins, electrolyte replacement to name a few.  The decrease in kidney function itself along with anemia and other comorbid issues contribute to fatigue.
     
     

    • 1 hr 3 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
30 Ratings

30 Ratings

Swellecat ,

Just what I am looking for!

I really enjoy this podcast and have already learned a lot. I appreciate that this nursing podcast actually talks about clinical subjects, vs other nursing podcasts out there. I feel myself becoming a "better hospital citizen" already. Thank you!

skushRN ,

Thank you!!! This is the best!

I am so glad I found this podcast! It has been so helpful and addresses real life problems and situations in a clear, practical, thorough, not overwhelming way. The dialogue between a nurse and their perspective and a doctor and their perspective was one I always wished I could have time for so this is so helpful. I look forward to more of the same!

ShCol ,

Great topics and I love the depth

Sometimes I find myself listening to podcasts for physicians because I’m looking for nuts and bolts medical podcasts, but then I find myself in the weeds because those are geared for providers. I love that this podcast is built for nurses, but aims to go into more depth on specific topics. I love that a variety of medical professionals are interviewed because it’s so helpful to look through the lens of a different specialty. My only teeny tiny critique would be to get new theme music. I really do not enjoy the current start to the show. But truly, such a valuable podcast and I look forward to future episodes!

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