300 episodes

Podcast by Philosophy Talk Starters

Philosophy Talk Starters Philosophy Talk Starters

    • Education
    • 4.0, 45 Ratings

Podcast by Philosophy Talk Starters

    507: Can Streets Disciminate?

    507: Can Streets Disciminate?

    More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/can-streets-discriminate.

    City streets play an important role in our everyday lives. We commute to work, walk our dogs, meet our friends, and stage protests on city streets. In theory, streets are open for anyone to physically access. But do streets, by their design, actually discriminate against certain people? If so, who has less access to city streets? Is the design of our cities a political matter? Can we even talk about cities as being just or unjust by design? Or are they simply inconvenient, or poorly designed, for some? Josh and Ray hit the streets with Shane Epting from the Missouri University of Science and Technology, Co-Director of the Philosophy of the City research group.

    • 9 min
    449: James Baldwin and Social Justice

    449: James Baldwin and Social Justice

    More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/james-baldwin.

    Sometimes, we struggle to tell the truth -- especially when it's the truth about ourselves. Why did James Baldwin, a prominent Civil Rights-era intellectual and novelist, believe that telling the truth about ourselves is not only difficult but can also be dangerous? How can truth deeply unsettle our assumptions about ourselves and our relations to others? And why did Baldwin think that this abstract concept of truth could play a concrete role in social justice? The Philosophers seek their own truth with Christopher Freeburg from the University of Illinois, author of "Black Aesthetics and the Interior Life."

    • 10 min
    506: The Ethical Jerk

    506: The Ethical Jerk

    More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/ethical-jerk.

    Ethics philosophers are more ethical than the average person — right? Well, maybe not. Studies show that philosophy professors are just as biased as the rest of us, and no more generous in their charitable giving. So does that mean they’re not any more ethical too? What’s the point of doing moral philosophy if it’s not to make ourselves more ethical? How can we make ourselves better people? Or are we doomed to moral mediocrity, despite our best efforts to the contrary? Josh and Ray play nice with Eric Schwitzgebel from UC Riverside, author of "A Theory of Jerks and Other Philosophical Misadventures."

    • 10 min
    448: Frantz Fanon and the Violence of Colonialism

    448: Frantz Fanon and the Violence of Colonialism

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/frantz-fanon.

    Frantz Fanon is a thinker who has inspired radical liberation movements in places ranging from Palestine to South Africa to the United States. Most famous for his work "The Wretched of the Earth," Fanon is often understood as a proponent of revolutionary violence. But is this a fair characterization of Fanon, or is it an oversimplification of a deeper and richer body of work? What exactly is Fanon’s philosophy of violence, and how does it relate to his philosophy and psychology of the colonial subject? How has Fanon shaped how we think of identity politics? The Philosophers welcome Nigel Gibson from Emerson College, author of "Fanon: The Postcolonial Imagination."

    • 11 min
    505: Walter Bejamin and the Re-Enchanted World

    505: Walter Bejamin and the Re-Enchanted World

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/walter-benjamin.

    Walter Benjamin was a German Jewish critical theorist, essayist, and philosopher who died tragically during the Second World War. His thoughts about modernity, history, art, disenchantment, and re-enchantment are still discussed today. So who was Benjamin, and what is his intellectual legacy? Why did he believe that Enlightenment values, such as rationality and modernization, brought about disenchantment in the world? Did he think there was a way to find re-enchantment without abandoning these values? And what would he have had to say about social media and its power to distract? The hosts have an enchanting time with Margaret Cohen from Stanford University, author of "Profane Illumination: Walter Benjamin and the Paris of Surrealist Revolution."

    • 9 min
    504: Pet Ethics

    504: Pet Ethics

    More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/pet-ethics.

    Many of us, even the staunchest animal activists, usually take it for granted that keeping a pet is morally acceptable. But regardless of how well we treat our animal “companions,” by keeping pets we are declaring ownership and paternal authority over other living creatures, and confining them to our homes. Is there any good moral justification for the keeping of pets? What makes some, if any, animals suitable as pets but not others? Do we have a special obligation to animal companions that does not extend to other animals? The Philosophers fetch Gary Varner from Texas A&M University, author of "Personhood, Ethics, and Animal Cognition."

    • 9 min

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5
45 Ratings

45 Ratings

idamae poopsnatch ,

Here is the reason you must pay $

I, too, was irked by these teaser shorts. I was even more irked to learn one must subscribe and pay $ to hear full podcasts and access archives. However, I emailed the show and received an explanation: Stanford U doesn’t pay a cent to support this show. Further, there is a restriction on advertising because the show is recorded on the campus. Thus, their only choice was to make it available by subscription. The cost is reasonable in the Scheme of All Things, about $6 to $8 monthly depending on the length you choose. I have blown a lot more on worse things.

Jason S Woodrow ,

Couple Minutes Not Worth It

It hurts me to rate this so poorly. I get that you have to make money and are restricted on advertising. But, c’mon! Find a way to get it done so you can put a full episode up and not just a few minutes. Is the restriction because you record on campus? Then record off campus. Or whatever works. This method of putting up a couple minutes and then wanting us to search elsewhere for a paid download is awful. It adds so much friction to the process that it grinds to a halt. It could be a really interesting podcast, but I’m afraid I’m so discouraged with this process that I’m just deleting it from my playlist. Again, it’s painful because I think the content can be excellent. But I have about ten minutes a week to download a few hours of podcasts, and there’s just too much quality stuff out there that requires a single click and is frictionless.

1sinawhile ,

why no full episodes?

Phil Talk is superb -- but why can't full episodes be downloaded. The short segments are teases.

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