500 episodes

Podcast by Philosophy Talk Starters

Philosophy Talk Starters Philosophy Talk Starters

    • Education
    • 4.1 • 50 Ratings

Podcast by Philosophy Talk Starters

    547: The Changing Face of Antisemitism

    547: The Changing Face of Antisemitism

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/changing-face-antisemitism.

    Antisemitism is an old problem with roots that reach back to medieval Europe. While earlier forms focused more on religious bigotry, antisemitism in the modern period became increasingly racialized and politicized. So what is the connection between older ideas about Jews and Judaism, and contemporary antisemitic tropes and stereotypes? How are conspiratorial fears about Jewish invisibility and global control related to the emergence of finance capitalism? And what can history teach us about how to confront antisemitism today? Josh and Ray ask historian Francesca Trivellato from the Institute for Advanced Study, editor of "Jews in Early Modern Europe" (forthcoming), in a program recorded live at the Stanford Humanities Center.

    • 12 min
    396: Jean-Paul Sartre

    396: Jean-Paul Sartre

    More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/sartre.

    Jean-Paul Sartre was one of the first global public intellectuals, famous for his popular existentialist philosophy, his works of fiction, and his rivalry with Albert Camus. His existentialism was also adopted by Simone de Beauvoir, who used it as a foundation for modern theoretical feminism. So what exactly is existentialism? How is man condemned to be free, as Sartre claimed? And what’s so hellish about other people? John and Ken speak in good faith with Thomas Flynn from Emory University, author of "Sartre: A Philosophical Biography."

    • 11 min
    490: Conscious Machiness

    490: Conscious Machiness

    More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/conscious-machines.

    Computers have already surpassed us in their ability to perform certain cognitive tasks. Perhaps it won’t be long till every household has a super intelligent robot who can outperform us in almost every domain. While future AI might be excellent at appearing conscious, could AI ever actually become conscious? Would forcing conscious robots to work for us be akin to slavery? And could we design AI that specifically lacks consciousness, or is consciousness an emergent property of intelligence? Josh and Ken welcome Susan Schneider, Director of the AI, Mind and Society Group at the University of Connecticut and author of "Artificial You: A.I. and the Future of Your Mind."

    • 10 min
    546: The Scandalous Truth About Memoir

    546: The Scandalous Truth About Memoir

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/scandalous-truth-about-memoir.

    A memoir is a personal narrative written about a pivotal time in the author’s life. While the story is told from a particular perspective, the events recounted are supposed to be fact, not fiction. But what exactly counts as truth in memoir? Is the distinction between “literal truth” and “emotional truth” just a way of shirking responsibility for fabricating falsehoods? What other ethical responsibilities does the memoirist have—for example, when it comes to exposing other people’s secrets? And why should anyone read—or write—memoirs in the first place? Josh and Ray take a trip down memory lane with Helena de Bres from Wellesley College, author of "Artful Truths: The Philosophy of Memoir."

    • 11 min
    489: The Allure of Authoritarianism

    489: The Allure of Authoritarianism

    More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/allure-authoritarianism.

    In George Orwell’s 1984, the party’s “final, most essential command” was “to reject the evidence of your eyes and ears.” Authoritarian regimes call on us to accept as fact whatever they tell us; or worse, as Hannah Arendt says, they get us to a point where we no longer know—or care about—the difference between fiction and reality. So why are so many so willing to reject the evidence of their senses and deny basic, confirmable truths? Is there something about human psychology that makes us susceptible to totalitarian propaganda? And as the appeal of authoritarian leaders grows around the world, how do we guard against such radical thought manipulation? Josh and Ken lure Michael Lynch from the University of Connecticut, author of "Know-It-All Society: Truth and Arrogance in Political Culture."

    • 11 min
    482: J.S. Mill and the Good Life

    482: J.S. Mill and the Good Life

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/mill-and-good-life.

    John Stuart Mill was one of the most important British philosophers of the 19th century. As a liberal, he thought that individuals are generally the best judges of their own welfare. But Mill was also a utilitarian who thought that there were objectively lower and higher pleasures and that the good life was one which maximized higher pleasures. So is there a way to reconcile Mill’s liberal project with his utilitarianism? Is the good life for Mill one in which individuals determine their own paths? Or should those who know better still try to nudge others to live better lives? John and Ken fulfill their potential with David Brink from UC San Diego, author of Mill's Progressive Principles.

    • 11 min

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5
50 Ratings

50 Ratings

idamae poopsnatch ,

Here is the reason you must pay $

I, too, was irked by these teaser shorts. I was even more irked to learn one must subscribe and pay $ to hear full podcasts and access archives. However, I emailed the show and received an explanation: Stanford U doesn’t pay a cent to support this show. Further, there is a restriction on advertising because the show is recorded on the campus. Thus, their only choice was to make it available by subscription. The cost is reasonable in the Scheme of All Things, about $6 to $8 monthly depending on the length you choose. I have blown a lot more on worse things.

Jason S Woodrow ,

Couple Minutes Not Worth It

It hurts me to rate this so poorly. I get that you have to make money and are restricted on advertising. But, c’mon! Find a way to get it done so you can put a full episode up and not just a few minutes. Is the restriction because you record on campus? Then record off campus. Or whatever works. This method of putting up a couple minutes and then wanting us to search elsewhere for a paid download is awful. It adds so much friction to the process that it grinds to a halt. It could be a really interesting podcast, but I’m afraid I’m so discouraged with this process that I’m just deleting it from my playlist. Again, it’s painful because I think the content can be excellent. But I have about ten minutes a week to download a few hours of podcasts, and there’s just too much quality stuff out there that requires a single click and is frictionless.

1sinawhile ,

why no full episodes?

Phil Talk is superb -- but why can't full episodes be downloaded. The short segments are teases.

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