161 episodes

Let's talk about how to start a podcast, and how to grow your audience from there! This show takes you from novice podcaster to confident broadcaster. We talk all about the brilliant world of Podcasting – teaching you how to make, grow and monetise a great show. In this podcast I cover the full range of Podcasting skills, looking at: Podcasting Equipment – what microphones to buy, when to get a mixer, how to set it all up. Podcasting Techniques – recording interviews, recording outside events. Podcast Editing – what software to use, how to create the best audio possible. Podcast Promotion – how to grow your audience, how to market your brand. Podcast Planning – scripting, episode planning, topic generation. Podcast Monetisation – how to make money out of your broadcast without turning off your audience. And more – podcasting environments, events, speaking skills.I'll be bringing on guests from popular podcasts, talking to novices and experts alike, and generally helping you to create the best podcast possible. If you have any suggestions for future episodes, or feedback on the podcast, get in touch on twitter at @thepodcasthost or through the website at The Podcast Host

PodCraft | How to Podcast & Craft a Fantastic Show The Podcast Host

    • Business
    • 4.6 • 92 Ratings

Let's talk about how to start a podcast, and how to grow your audience from there! This show takes you from novice podcaster to confident broadcaster. We talk all about the brilliant world of Podcasting – teaching you how to make, grow and monetise a great show. In this podcast I cover the full range of Podcasting skills, looking at: Podcasting Equipment – what microphones to buy, when to get a mixer, how to set it all up. Podcasting Techniques – recording interviews, recording outside events. Podcast Editing – what software to use, how to create the best audio possible. Podcast Promotion – how to grow your audience, how to market your brand. Podcast Planning – scripting, episode planning, topic generation. Podcast Monetisation – how to make money out of your broadcast without turning off your audience. And more – podcasting environments, events, speaking skills.I'll be bringing on guests from popular podcasts, talking to novices and experts alike, and generally helping you to create the best podcast possible. If you have any suggestions for future episodes, or feedback on the podcast, get in touch on twitter at @thepodcasthost or through the website at The Podcast Host

    Can You Take Care of a Baby AND a Podcast? Podcasting & Parenting

    Can You Take Care of a Baby AND a Podcast? Podcasting & Parenting

    In this episode of Podcraft, Matthew and Colin talk about podcasting and parenting. They discuss the joys of being a new dad, from early morning buggy walks, to "having a good moan" about one's kids.

    Brought to you by Alitu: The Podcast Maker and The Podcast Host Planner
    Parents always think they’re organized and resilient. The same's true for podcasters. Kids are unpredictable, and podcasting can be the same way. The key takeaway from this discussion about podcasting and parenting is to be honest with your audience. 
    Colin recommends that new parents who make podcasts should plan ahead, but stay flexible, and be kind to themselves during this time. 
    They discussed episode release schedules, such as podcasting in seasons, as opposed to publishing episodes at random intervals. Colin recommends lining up some episodes in advance of your child's arrival, then publishing each over time. 
    For parents who can't leave their child unattended, don't try to multi-task. It's better to do one thing well, instead of multitasking a few things, poorly. 
    Don't Wish It Away
    This is a big milestone in one's life. It's worth not trying to do too much for your podcast. When babies are unpredictable and need a lot of care, there's a tendency to, as Matthew says, "wish things forward until the dust settles." Colin adds that parents should try to enjoy the early days while they can. In 13 years or so, your kids will want to do their own thing. You'll have plenty of time for podcasting then. 
    As a dad to two kids, Colin says, "the first year, especially the first three months, are hell." Plus, every kid is different. This isn't a good life stage for the results-oriented. But, he adds, the first six months are when babies sleep the most. Use this to your advantage: grab time for sleep and/or work when you can.  
    Colin adds that when babies are six to twelve months old, since they're more mobile, they need more supervision. They're more likely to grab things, like mixing board sliders. This is the age to child-proof your recording gear.

    Be realistic about your plans. Think of this time as maintenance mode. Again, communicate clearly and positively with your audience. It’s not going to kill your show if you miss an episode.
    Work sessions with shorter periods of time can force you to really focus. Be accepting of the work that you can get done in a shorter amount of time. Colin says, “a task will always expand to fill the time allowed.”  If you only have forty-five minutes while the baby's out for a walk or napping, you can't procrastinate, overthink, or be too much of a perfectionist.
    Rethink your show’s format. How can you bring value in less time, while still being yourself and making the same kind of show?  For example, instead of hour-long interview episodes, can you make fifteen-minute episodes of productive tips? 
    Support the show (https://pod.academy)

    • 49 min
    What Has Changed in Podcasting? How Does It Affect the Average Podcaster?

    What Has Changed in Podcasting? How Does It Affect the Average Podcaster?

    Podcasting news has been hard to keep up with this past year or so. Each week seems to bring a new development in the Apple Vs Spotify saga, a new "must use" tool or platform on the market, or a company buying another company for multiple zillions.

    In this episode, we have a chat about what all of this actually means for the average podcaster.

    It can be hard to keep up with all of this stuff, after all. You can start to think that if you're not totally on the ball with all of this, your podcast is going to vanish into the ether whilst everyone else moves on without you.

    But the same principles apply in podcasting as they did 15 years ago. Know why you're doing it, know who you want to reach, and show up on a consistent basis for your listeners.

    Resources Mentioned


    Alitu - The Podcast MakerHow to Sell Podcast EpisodesHow to Create a Private Podcast FeedPodcast Industry StatsPodland PodcastDeep Questions PodcastSupport the show (https://pod.academy)

    • 54 min
    Create Shareable Clips With Audiograms | PodCraft 1312

    Create Shareable Clips With Audiograms | PodCraft 1312

    Check out the full book - Podcast Growth: How to Grow Your Podcast Audience 

    Audiograms combine images, text, and audio to create a social media post. they are as memorable and attention-grabbing as video, without being as time-consuming or data-heavy. WNYC created an open-source code to accomplish this means of podcast promotion, and there are other options available to you now, too. 
    Type: Short Task
    Time Required: One hour
    Podcast Level: From the beginning 
    The open-source code that WNYC created was intended to be a free resource for podcasters to use to promote their work. It’s great, but it can be confusing for people who don’t know how to code. Fortunately, Headliner has created an app which guides you through the process. The free version lets you make a certain number of audiograms per month. Depending on the social media platform for which you intend to make your audiogram, the size constraints vary. However, you can use the same content with different aspect ratios or time limits for different platforms. 
    Figure out what section of your podcast you want to highlight. Much like quote images, an audiogram is a sample of a moment from your podcast. In this case, instead of a line or two of text, you’re using a few seconds to a few minutes of audio. 
    Decide on the art you want to use. For consistency, you probably want to use your podcast logo. However, you can certainly use whatever art you want, as long as it fits with Headliner’s size requirements. 
    Including closed-captioning is a wise choice. Many people browse social media with the sound turned off, and don’t turn the sound on unless they’re curious about a particular post. If you include closed-captioning (well done: you make your post more accessible), go through and edit it for accuracy. 
    Headliner’s mobile app honestly makes it easy for you to promote your show from your phone. You could do this while you’re waiting for a coffee order or sitting in a park 
    Task List: 
    Go to Headliner’s website and sign up for a free account. Use the Audiogram Wizard and type in your podcast’s name or RSS feed.Select the portion of your podcast episode that you want to share.Follow the Audiogram Wizard instructions to create your audiogram. If you use closed-captions, proofread and edit them for accuracy. Check the audiogram to make sure it’s just right. Download a copy for your archives. Post the audiogram to social media. Make sure that the post includes a link to your podcast website. Encourage your followers to share the post. thepodcasthost.com/audiograms - How to Make and Use Audiograms
    thepodcasthost.com/publishtoyoutube - Publishing Your Podcast on YouTube

    Next season we are running some Q&A episodes - submit your questions here!
    Check out the full book - Podcast Growth: How to Grow Your Podcast Audience 
    Support the show (https://pod.academy)

    • 24 min
    Why Overcast Is One of the Best Places to Advertise Your Podcast | PodCraft 1311

    Why Overcast Is One of the Best Places to Advertise Your Podcast | PodCraft 1311

    Check out the full book - Podcast Growth: How to Grow Your Podcast Audience 

    Overcast is one of the most popular podcast listening apps in the world today. And with good reason – it's a superb app, packed with useful features.
    Overcast is built for podcast listeners. But, they also provide the tools for podcasters to advertise their shows in the app. These ads appear as unobtrusive little banners, which the app’s users see at the bottom of their screen. 
    On these banner ads, you’ll see a podcast’s name, cover art, and a little snippet description tempting the listener to click it. 
    With Overcast ads, 100% of the folks that you reach are podcast listeners. That's why they're looking at Overcast when they see your ad. They're likely either listening to a podcast, or about to hit play on one.
    This means they're literally one click away from browsing your podcast inside their chosen listening app. And one more click away from hitting Play or Subscribe.
    There's no education needed here. There's no “what is a podcast?”, no “find us at…”. It's simply down to the snippet you write when you create your ad. 
    The ads are unobtrusive, yet clearly visible to the user. 
    Costs vary on topic, and on-demand, but you can usually start advertising on Overcast from around $300.
    Type: Short Task
    Time Required: 15 minutes to set up. Runs for 1 month. 
    Podcast Level: 3 episodes or more.
    You need to sign up for an Overcast account at Overcast.fm.
    Overcast is an iOS-only listening app, but anyone can sign up for an account on their computer.
    Once you're in, go to overcast.fm/ads where you'll see the full details. This includes info on current pricing and estimated reach.
    As you'll see, ads are broken out into different categories. Naturally, the cost is higher for the more popular ones. You can see how many slots are available, and which ones are currently sold out. If it's one of the sold out ones you're after, you can ask to be notified when they become available.
    Once you select a category, you'll click through to a page where you can customise your snippet. You’ll want to write a sentence or two that acts as a ‘hook’, to be displayed alongside the podcast name and cover art. 
    If you leave this blank, Overcast will use the start of the description in your feed. It’s much better to write something in there that doesn’t cut off. Try adding “Click here to get started”, if you have the room. 
    Then, you can preview your ad, before reviewing your purchase, and making the payment. It's really simple.
    Task List: 
    Sign up for an Overcast account at Overcast.fm.Select your targeted podcast category.Customise your snippet.Preview your ad.Complete your purchase.Further Reading: Promoting Your Podcast on Overcast
    Check out the full book - Podcast Growth: How to Grow Your Podcast Audience 
    Support the show (https://pod.academy)

    • 23 min
    Market Your Podcast With an Ebook | PodCraft 1310

    Market Your Podcast With an Ebook | PodCraft 1310

    Check out the full book - Podcast Growth: How to Grow Your Podcast Audience 

    When you’ve published a decent amount of episodes, you might consider re-writing your scripts and notes from each one into an ebook. You can give this away as an incentive to people who contribute to you through a fundraising campaign, or as a reward for signing up for your mailing list. You can even publish it and offer it for sale through Amazon’s self-publishing channels.  It’s a good way to encapsulate your information, while also rewarding your audience for their commitment. 
    Type: Big Strategy
    Time Required: One month to plan, compile, re-write, and publish
    Podcast Level: At least ten episodes
    So, you have a basic script of talking points for each episode (or, better yet, you have transcripts). You have your show notes, and you also have any blog posts or visual aids. You also have an audience that’s interested in your show’s topic. 
    For each episode, put together any notes or talking points you used, your transcript if you have one, any visual aids that you might have posted on your website or Instagram, and your show notes and blog post for the episode. 
    Look at this information as a whole. What’s the cohesive narrative? What did you learn about your podcast’s topic, as you went through the process of making this podcast? What have you learned about it from your audience and your guests? This is a good time for you to encapsulate what you’ve learned so far, and what you can share with others. 
    Edit this information into one cohesive document. A reasonable ebook usually runs about 7,000 to 10,000 words. As long as you’re covering the most important points in your information, explaining them clearly, and giving your audience value, length doesn’t matter. 
    It’s always a good idea to have someone unbiased and skilled proofread your document before sending it anywhere. You can find someone who does book editing services on Fiverr, or trade services with a friend. A good designer can make sure your ebook is pleasing to the eye and enjoyable to read. If you prefer the DIY route, you can make a pretty good book cover in Canva. 
    You can save this as one PDF, and give it to your supporters directly. This makes a great gift for the people who have supported you, as well as a good enticement for a new audience. 
    You can also publish it through Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing. This lets you set the price, earn royalties, and publish in either digital or paperback. 
    Task List: 
    Organize your show notes, scripts/talking points, transcripts, visual aids, and blog posts for each episode.  Take note of what you’ve learned through this process. Write a book, using the information you’ve compiled. Get an unbiased, skilled editor to proofread and edit your book. Have a designer make sure your fonts and layout look good, and design a quality cover. Share this book with your supporters. Check out the full book - Podcast Growth: How to Grow Your Podcast Audience 
    Support the show (https://pod.academy)

    • 24 min
    Finding New Listeners at the Bottom of a Pint Glass | PodCraft 1309

    Finding New Listeners at the Bottom of a Pint Glass | PodCraft 1309

    Check out the full book - Podcast Growth: How to Grow Your Podcast Audience 

    Podcast-themed beer mats or coasters! This is a “helpful” way of distributing your podcast logo or branding around pubs and bars in your area. A little cardboard coaster is a useful thing in these places. They help keep the table dry, and some folks even collect them. If your design is intriguing enough, a person resting their glass on one may pull out their phone and subscribe to your podcast there and then. 
    Type: Ongoing task
    Time Required: One month from design through to creation and delivery. Ongoing strategy to distribute. 
    Podcast Level: At any time
    The starting point is your coaster design. What are you going to put on there to catch people’s eye? 
    Your podcast logo can be a good choice here, just like with stickers or magnets. But, unlike those, you have a bit more time with the person looking at your coaster. They’re also up close to it, so it doesn’t need to work in an at-a-glance sort of way.  
    I actually recommend getting yourself 2-4 different designs. A typical bar or pub table sits 4 people, so you can leave 4 different coasters which could even spark some discussion amongst the folks who sit there next. 
    Could you create one using a quote from a podcast review? Or, from yourself or an interview guest on the show? You can use humour or intrigue to make the person looking at it want to find out more. As always, it comes down to your own brand and tone, as well as your target audience. 
    You should always have your podcast’s name on each coaster. Get your URL on there too. Make sure the people who want to find out more, actually can. 
    Cardboard coasters are relatively cheap to have made. Many online printing services offer this service, and you’ll generally pick up bundles of 100 to 250 with each design. 
    Next comes the distribution. I use this guerrilla marketing tactic myself; I’ll shove a stack of them in my jacket pocket if I’m heading on a day out somewhere. Each time I’m in a pub, I’ll stick coasters under all of our glasses at the table. When we leave, other folks will sit there, and who knows? One might even go on to become the show’s biggest fan. 
    You can also harness the power of your listeners by running a competition. Ask them to take a picture of their drinks proudly sitting on your coasters when they’re out somewhere. You can run a hashtag for this so everyone can see each other’s pictures, too. 
    This is a fun way to market your podcast, because you never know who’s going to sit down and start studying your “ad” next. Also, it’s a great excuse to get some friends together and go for a drink one weekend! 
    Task List: 
    Have 2-4 different types of coaster design made. Use your logo, but also consider things like quotes from reviews or from the show itself. Remember to have the podcast name, or even a URL on them. Each time you’re going to be in a cafe, pub, or bar, take some with you. Put them under the glasses or cups on your table as you drink. When you leave, leave them for the next people who’ll sit there. Consider running listener competitions to see how many bars around the world you can get photos of your coasters “in action”. Further Reading: thepodcasthost.com/guerrilla
    Check out the full book - Podcast Growth: How to Grow Your Podcast Audience 
    Support the show (https://pod.academy)

    • 16 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
92 Ratings

92 Ratings

MPenoir ,

100% practical

Listened to the 1000 series on the basics and launched my organization’s podcast with no prior production experience. Huge thanks to Colin and his co-hosts for helping the podcaster community grow and flourish – and for the winning Scottish accents!

SNL&JazzBuff ,

Highly recommended

If you're looking for a great podcast about putting together a podcast, this show is for you.

JBadge91 ,

Speakers of Experience

Unlike other podcasts I’ve listened to, these guys really seem to know what they’re talking about from experience, as opposed to people trying to figure it out, and hoping a lightbulb moment will occur in real-time.

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