56 episodes

SLP Nerdcast offers ASHA CEUs through “podcast learning.” We discuss clinical issues and best practices relevant to speech and language pathologists. We review resources and literature while trying to not bore you to tears.

Who are we? We are two speech language pathologists (one dually certified BCBA) who met several years ago and became kindred spirits in nerdiness and sci-fi fantasy books - but that’s a topic for a different podcast. We enjoy reading, thinking, and discussing speech language pathology topics. We are lifelong learners and clinicians with over 30 years combined experience working with individuals who have complex communication needs across a range of settings including outpatient, private practice, public schools, and private schools. We are NOT PhDs, researchers, or particularly fancy people, but we are clinicians (nerds) who care deeply about the individuals and families we support, and we value using evidence to get us to a place of success.

We will always provide a handful of references or resources and we of course love to get feedback. You can email us anytime at info@slpnerdcast.com. Tell us what you liked, that you think we’re a snooze fest, or if there is a topic you'd like us to cover.

SLP Nerdcast Kate Grandbois, MS, CCC-SLP, BCBA, LABA; Amy Wonkka, MA, CCC-SLP.

    • Education
    • 4.9 • 34 Ratings

SLP Nerdcast offers ASHA CEUs through “podcast learning.” We discuss clinical issues and best practices relevant to speech and language pathologists. We review resources and literature while trying to not bore you to tears.

Who are we? We are two speech language pathologists (one dually certified BCBA) who met several years ago and became kindred spirits in nerdiness and sci-fi fantasy books - but that’s a topic for a different podcast. We enjoy reading, thinking, and discussing speech language pathology topics. We are lifelong learners and clinicians with over 30 years combined experience working with individuals who have complex communication needs across a range of settings including outpatient, private practice, public schools, and private schools. We are NOT PhDs, researchers, or particularly fancy people, but we are clinicians (nerds) who care deeply about the individuals and families we support, and we value using evidence to get us to a place of success.

We will always provide a handful of references or resources and we of course love to get feedback. You can email us anytime at info@slpnerdcast.com. Tell us what you liked, that you think we’re a snooze fest, or if there is a topic you'd like us to cover.

    Get it Write! Why and How to Incorporate Writing into School-Based SLP Practice

    Get it Write! Why and How to Incorporate Writing into School-Based SLP Practice

    Get .1 ASHA CEU here
    Episode Summary:This just in! Students do better when they are engaged and motivated! Okay... maybe that’s not a newsflash for you, but perhaps you haven’t yet thought about the role of engagement and motivation in academics, specifically writing endeavors for students who struggle with language. In this week’s episode, Dr. Robin Danzack of Emerson College in Boston floods the podcast newswaves with her expertise on the role of “authentic” student writing intervention in school-based SLP practice. Tune in to discover why you should be thinking about writing (specifically “authentic” writing) as an SLP and how you can join forces with your fellow educators to integrate meaningful, dual-purpose, curriculum-based, writing interventions into your assessment and support practices. Got any comic book or video game fans on your caseload? You’ll get some great tips to further bolster your existing strength as an SLP in customizing interventions to meet your students’ unique needs and interests while fostering growth in language and literacy, simultaneously. As with many thought-provoking episodes in the Nerdcast library, you won’t take your ear off this one, and I guarantee you’ll leave inspired to weave writing into the fabric of your language intervention, and to spread the news across the virtual or physical break room!
    Learn more about Robin here
    Learning Outcomes
    1. Explain the value of “authentic writing” to promote student engagement, motivation, and sociocultural-linguistic identity. 
    2. Analyze a student writing sample for microstructural vs. macrostructural features.
    3. Connect writing goals to language and speech outcomes, as well as to grade-level curriculum and learning standards.
    References
    Collins, G., & Wolter, J. A. (2019). Morphological awareness strategies to promote academic success at tier 1 through interprofessional collaboration. Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, 4, 781-789.
    Danzak, R. L. (2011). Defining identities through multiliteracies: ELL teens narrate their immigration experiences as graphic stories. Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, 55, 187-196.
    Harris, R. K. (2008). Powerful writing strategies for all students. Paul H. Brookes.
    Kamhi, A. G., & Catts, H. W. (2012). Language and reading disabilities (3rd ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.
    Moll, L. C., Amanti, D., Neff, D., & González, N. (1992). Funds of knowledge for teaching: Using a qualitative approach to connect homes and classrooms. Theory into Practice, 21 (2), 132–141.
    Schuele, C. M., & Boudreau, D. (2008). Phonological awareness intervention: Beyond the basics. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 39, 3-20.
    Ukrainetz, T. A. (2015). Telling a good story: Teaching the structure of narrative. In T. A. Ukrainetz (Ed.), School-age language intervention: Evidence-based practices, pp. 335-377. Austin, TX: Pro-Ed. 
    Westby, C. (2014). A language perspective on executive functioning, metacognition, and self-regulation in reading. In C. A. Stone, E. R. Silliman, B. J. Ehren, & G. P. Wallach (Eds.), Handbook of language and literacy: Development and disorders (2nd ed.), pp. 339-358. New York, NY: Guilford Press.

    Online Resources:
    ASHA Position statement on Reading and Writing in Children and Adolescents: https://www.asha.org/policy/ps2001-00104/
    Self-Regulated Strategy Development (SRSD): https://www.thinksrsd.com/
    Comic Life Software: http://plasq.com/apps/comiclife/macwin/
    Disclosures:
    Robin Danzak Financial Disclosures: Robin is an employee of Emerson College. Robin Danzak non-financial disclousres: Robin is a member of ASHA and the corresonding SIG 14.
    Kate Grandbois financial disclosures: Kate is the owner / founder of Grandbois Therapy + Consulting, LLC and co-founder of SLP Nerdcast.  Kate Grandbois non-financial disclosures: Kate is a member of ASHA, SIG 12, and s

    • 1 hr
    Screening and Progress Monitoring of Language

    Screening and Progress Monitoring of Language

    Get .1 ASHA CEU here
    Episode Summary
    You’re an awesome school-based SLP, the resident language expert, the speech closet hostess with the mostest.  You’re chugging along, doing your assessment thing, determining eligibility here, pushing into the classroom there, pulling kids out, chattin’ with the teacher- you’ve got this! Then BAM!! This episode comes out of nowhere and reveals an unknown blind spot in our educational system, putting a serious snag in your assessment status quo.  No worries, the Nerds and their experts have your back!  
    This week, Dr. Trina Spencer and Dr. Doug Peterson step up once again with an eye-opening follow-up to their previous episodes on dynamic assessment (DA) and Multi-Tiered Systems of Supports (MTSS) for language assessment and intervention in schools. Tune in to go the extra MTSS and DA mile and learn about your essential role in the screening and prevention domain, an area of SLP not often explored, but so essential to a student’s academic success. You’ll drive away with a better understanding of the roles of language assessment beyond eligibility determination, along with (free but fabulous) tools you’ll need to adjust for that screening blindspot and to help your education team set students up for language (and therein, academic) success. There’s free stuff, witty banter, soap boxes, and MacGyvering. Don’t miss out!
    You can learn more about Trina and Doug here.

    Learning Outcomes
    1. List the purpose of assessment and identify those necessary for MTSS.
    2. Describe the characteristics of curriculum-based measures.
    3. Explain how/why oral narrative retells are appropriate for screening and progress monitoring of language.
    Online Resources
    You can access the free CUBED Assessment mentioned in this episode here.
    References
    Petersen, D. B., Spencer, T. D., Konishi, A., Sellars, T. P., Robertson, D., & Foster, M. E. (2020). Using parallel, narrative-based measures to examine the relationship between listening and reading comprehension. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 51(4), 1097-1111. https://doi.org/10.1044/2020_LSHSS-19-00036 
    Petersen, D. B., & Spencer, T. D. (2014). Narrative assessment and intervention: A clinical tutorial on extending explicit language instruction and progress monitoring to all students. Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, 21, 5-21. https://doi.org/10.1044/cds21.1.5 
    Petersen, D. B., & Spencer, T. D. (2012). The Narrative Language Measures: Tools for language screening, progress monitoring, and intervention planning. Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, 19(4), 119-129. https://doi.org/10.1044/lle19.4.119 

    Disclosures:
    Dr. Petersen and Dr. Spencer financial relationships: They are co-authors of the Story Champs curriculum and PEARL dynamic assessment. They receive royalties from the sales of those items.  Dr. Spencer and Dr. Petersen have no financial relationships to disclose.
    Kate Grandbois financial disclosures: Kate is the owner / founder of Grandbois Therapy + Consulting, LLC and co-founder of SLP Nerdcast.  Kate Grandbois non-financial disclosures: Kate is a member of ASHA, SIG 12, and serves on the AAC Advisory Group for Massachusetts Advocates for Children. She is also a member of the Berkshire Association for Behavior Analysis and Therapy (BABAT), MassABA, the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI) and the corresponding Speech Pathology and Applied Behavior Analysis SIG. 
    Amy Wonkka financial disclosures:  Amy is an employee of a public school system and co-founder for SLP Nerdcast. Amy Wonkka non-financial disclosures: Amy is a member of ASHA, SIG 12, and serves on the AAC Advisory Group for Massachusetts Advocates for Children.

    Time Ordered Agenda:
    10 minutes: Introduction, Disclaimers and Disclosures
    20 minutes:

    • 1 hr 2 min
    School Re-entry After a Brain Injury

    School Re-entry After a Brain Injury

    Get .1 ASHA CEU here
    Episode Summary:How common is it for children to acquire a brain injury and what does that have to do with you as a school-based SLP? Tune in this week to find out as pediatric brain injury specialist and SLP, Jenny Traver, shares her expertise in helping children and families transition back to school after brain injury. This episode is a great reminder that although you may not be a “cog-com expert” like Jenny, as an SLP with a neural base in your graduate training, you have the basic tools you need to consider the acquired side, not just the development side, of our field. Jenny shares info and strategies to build on your basics, including: the importance of considering the whole child when determining what supports will be needed for reentry success, the need for regular monitoring and collaboration between the professionals supporting the child and family, and the value of discovering gradual and meaningful ways to get children back into the school environment without over-taxing their systems. Despite the dense nature of this neuro topic, this episode has a wonderful mix of science, practicality, and compassion that will certainly spark your interest and broaden your competence as you are inspired to take a more active role in supporting these vulnerable students as they navigate big life changes.
    Learn more about Jenny here
    Learning Outcomes
    Participants will understand the role of the SLP in supporting clients with brain injuries in returning to school.
    Participants will identify key considerations for clients in the school re-entry planning process.
    Participants will identify at least strategies and resources to support patient/family education on the return to school process.
    Online Resources:
    The Brain Injury Association of America: https://www.biausa.org/
    The CDC Heads Up Campaign: https://www.cdc.gov/headsup/index.html
    Brainline: https://www.brainline.org/
    ASHA Resources on pediatric brain injury: https://www.asha.org/practice-portal/clinical-topics/pediatric-traumatic-brain-injury/
    The Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center: https://msktc.org/
    Disclosures:
    Jenny Traver financial disclosures: She is the founder and owner of Cognitive SLP. Non-financial disclosures: Jenny is a member of ASHA and the Academy of Certified Brain Injury Specialists.
    Kate Grandbois financial disclosures: Kate is the owner / founder of Grandbois Therapy + Consulting, LLC and co-founder of SLP Nerdcast.  Kate Grandbois non-financial disclosures: Kate is a member of ASHA, SIG 12, and serves on the AAC Advisory Group for Massachusetts Advocates for Children. She is also a member of the Berkshire Association for Behavior Analysis and Therapy (BABAT), MassABA, the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI) and the corresponding Speech Pathology and Applied Behavior Analysis SIG. 
    Tracey Callahan financial disclosures: Tracey is an employee of SLP Nerdcast, owns a private practice, and is the owner of an online learning platform called Guest Monster Games. Tracey Callahan non-financial disclosures: Tracey a member of ASHA and the corresponding special interest group (SIG 13) for Dysphagia. You can learn more about Tracey here.

    Time Ordered Agenda:
    10 minutes: Introduction, Disclaimers and Disclosures
    20 minutes: Descriptions of the role of the SLP in supporting clients with brain injuries in returning to school.
    15 minutes: Descriptions of key considerations for clients in the school re-entry planning process.
    10 minutes: Descriptions of strategies and resources to support patient/family education on the return to school process
    5 minutes: Summary and Closing

    Disclaimer
    The contents of this episode are not meant to replace clinical advice.  SLP Nerdcast, its hosts and guests do not represent or endorse specific products or procedures mentioned during our episodes unless otherwise stated.

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Essential Elements of MTSS for Language

    Essential Elements of MTSS for Language

    Get .1 ASHA CEU here
    Episode Summary
    Pssst! SLP! Yep, you over there in the speech closet. Did you know that you are likely the most knowledgeable professional in your school when it comes to language development, assessment, and intervention? Ok, so maybe you already knew that, but do your education colleagues and administrators know? This week’s episode tackles the basics of Multi-Tiered Systems of Supports (MTSS) in schools and provides an incredibly strong argument for why SLP’s need a leadership seat at the MTSS table. Return offenders, Dr. Trina Spencer and Dr. Doug Peterson, lay out the relationship between an SLP’s expertise and the MTSS mission of preventing “dysteachia.” They do this by highlighting the truth: that listening and speaking are the foundation for reading and writing. Not a school-based SLP? If you’re working with kids in any context, this cast will offer some amazing gems to add to your EBP tool-box for supporting kids with language learning differences. Tune in to learn more about why the domain of language needs to be included in MTSS frameworks and walk away with some key actionables to start the conversation and build the foundation on MTSS collaboration for language support in your school’s culture.
    You can learn more about Trina and Doug here.
    Summary Written by Tanna Neufeld, MS, CCC-SLP, Contributing Editor
    Learning Outcomes
    1. Explain why language needs to be included in schools’ MTSS efforts.
    2. Describe what the purpose of MTSS is and its key features.
    3. List the characteristics of language intervention and assessment tools necessary for MTSS.
    Online Resources
    You can access the free CUBED Assessment mentioned in this episode here.
    References
    Petersen, D. B., Mesquita, M. W., Spencer, T. D., & Waldron, J. (2020). Examining the Effects of Multitiered Oral Narrative Language Instruction on Reading Comprehension and Writing. Topics in Language Disorders, 40(4). doi:10.1097/tld.0000000000000227
    Petersen, D., & Spencer, T. D. (2014). Narrative Assessment and Intervention: A Clinical Tutorial on Extending Explicit Language Instruction and Progress Monitoring to All Students. Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations, 21(1), 5-21. doi:10.1044/cds21.1.5
    Spencer, T. D., Petersen, D. B., Slocum, T. A., & Allen, M. M. (2014). Large group narrative intervention in Head Start preschools: Implications for response to intervention. Journal of Early Childhood Research, 13(2), 196-217. doi:10.1177/1476718x13515419
    Spencer, T. D., Petersen, D. B., & Adams, J. L. (2015). Tier 2 Language Intervention for Diverse Preschoolers: An Early-Stage Randomized Control Group Study Following an Analysis of Response to Intervention. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 24(4), 619-636. doi:10.1044/2015_ajslp-14-0101
    Ukrainetz, T. A. (2006). The Implications of RTI and EBP for SLPs: Commentary on L. M. Justice. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 37(4), 298-303. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2006/034)
    Weddle, S. A., Spencer, T. D., Kajian, M., & Petersen, D. B. (2016). An Examination of a Multitiered System of Language Support for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Preschoolers: Implications for Early and Accurate Identification. School Psychology Review, 45(1), 109-133. doi:10.17105/spr45-1.109-132

    Disclosures:
    Dr. Petersen and Dr. Spencer financial relationships: They are co-authors of the Story Champs curriculum and PEARL dynamic assessment. They receive royalties from the sales of those items.  Dr. Spencer and Dr. Petersen have no financial relationships to disclose.
    Kate Grandbois financial disclosures: Kate is the owner / founder of Grandbois Therapy + Consulting, LLC and co-founder of SLP Nerdcast.  Kate Grandbois non-financial disclosures: Kate is a member of ASHA, SIG 12, and serves on the AAC Advisory Grou

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Building AAC Competence through Interdisciplinary Collaboration and Mentorship

    Building AAC Competence through Interdisciplinary Collaboration and Mentorship

    Get .1 ASHA CEU here
    Episode Summary
    Let’s hear a Woot! Woot! (with an emphasis on the OT) for this week’s episode featuring Instagrammers and AAC enthusiasts, Mara Jonet (SLP) and Annabeth Knight (OT) of The Fanny Pack Therapist. This collaborative duo shares their tips and experiences tackling AAC assessment and intervention through the evidence-based practice of interdisciplinary collaboration. Learn how to utilize creative partnerships with your friendly neighborhood OT to fill the gaps in and expand the borders of your scope of competence in AAC service delivery for children with complex needs. Annabeth and Mara are a shining example of “paying it forward” as they describe strategies for creating a mutually beneficial partnership that lends unparalleled benefits for clients and professionals alike. Even Mabel the dog is listening, and so should you! You can learn more about Mara and Annabeth here.
    Summary Written by Tanna Neufeld, MS, CCC-SLP, Contributing Editor
    Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify at least 3 resources which provide evidence supporting an interdisciplinary collaboration approach in evaluation and treatment for children with complex communication needs.
    2. Describe 3 unique roles of each the OT and SLP throughout the AAC and AT service provision process.
    3. Explore gaps in basic competencies for AAC practitioners, and learn at least 4 tangible strategies for enabling practitioner growth through training and collaboration. 
    References
    American Occupational Therapy Association. (2010). Specialized knowledge and skills in technology and environmental interventions for occupational therapy practice American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 64.American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. (2016). Scope of practice in speech-language pathology [Scope of Practice]. Available from www.asha.org/policy/.
    Angelo, J., & Smith, R. (1989). The critical role of occupational therapy in augmentative and alternative communication services. In Technology review 1989: Perspective on occupational therapy practice(pp. 49-53). Rockville, MD: American Occupational  Therapy Association. 
    Brady, N., Bruce, S., Goldman, A., Erickson, K., Mineo, B., Ogletree, B., . . . Wilkinson, K. (2016). Communication services and supports for individuals with severe disabilities: Guidance for assessment and intervention. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 121, 121-138.
    Copley, J., & Ziviani, J. (2007). Use of a team-based approach to assistive technology assessment and planning for children with multiple disabilities: a pilot study. Assistive Technology, 19, 109-125.
    Cunningham, B. (2014). Rethinking occupational therapy’s role with assistive technology. OT Practice,19(11), CE-1-CE-7. 
    Dukhovny, E., & Kelly, E. B. (2015). Practical resources for provision of services to culturally and linguistically diverse users of AAC. Perspectives on Cultural and Linguistic Diversity, 22, 25–39.
    Farber, J.G., & Goldstein, M.K. (1998). Parents working with speech-language pathologists to foster partnerships in  education. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, (29), 24-35.
    Hill, K., & Corsi, V. (2012). Role of speech-language pathologists in assistive technology assessments. In S. Federici & M. J. Scherer (Eds.), Assistive technology assessment handbook (pp. 301–327). Boca Raton. FL: CRC Press.
    Lahm, E.A., Bell, J.K., & Blackhurst, A.E. (2002). Using interdisciplinary teams: University of Kentucky Assistive Technology (UKAT) toolkit. Retrieved from 
    http://edsrc.coe.uky.edu/www/ukatii/resources/index.html 
    Moyers, P.A., & Metzler, C.A. (2014). Health Policy Perspectives-Interprofessional collaborative Practice in care coordination. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 68, 500-505.
    National Joint Committee for the Communication Needs of Persons With Severe Disabilities. (1992). Guid

    • 1 hr 4 min
    AAC Evaluation Basics Part 2:The Feature Matching Process

    AAC Evaluation Basics Part 2:The Feature Matching Process

    Get .1 ASHA CEU here
    Episode Summary
    AAC evaluations got you reaching for the Advil? Breathe, there’s a framework for that! 
    In this week’s episode, learn how to eliminate the guesswork in AAC system decision-making as Kate and Amy tag-team Part 2 of the AAC Evaluation Basics Series. If you are new to AAC evaluations and haven’t listened to Part 1 in this series, you might want to take a quick detour to set your foundation. If your mindset is in the AAC-foundational principles zone already, jump right in to this week’s meaty discussion to broaden your scope of competence as an SLP supporting communication development with AAC. The Nerdcast crew is certainly in their zone here as they unpack tangible tools and tips to help you execute an AAC evaluation that is rooted in evidence based practice and person-centered care. Your challenge if you choose to accept it: learn how to rise above the social media and marketing buzz about the next best AAC craze to hit the app stores by getting a firm grasp on key areas of AAC assessment, invaluable assessment strategies, and the importance of a features versus fad approach to choosing tools for trial.
    Learning Outcomes
    1. Define feature matching and describe its role in the AAC assessment process
    2. Identify at least 3 components of a comprehensive AAC assessment
    3. Identify at least 3 client considerations when conducting a comprehensive AAC assessment
    References
    Gosnell, J., Costello, J., & Shane, H. (2011). Using a Clinical Approach To Answer “What Communication Apps Should We Use?”. Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 20(3), 87-96. doi:10.1044/aac20.3.87
    Light, J. (1989) Toward a definition of communicative competence for individuals using augmentative and alternative communication systems, Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 5:2, 137-144, DOI: 10.1080/07434618912331275126
    Light, J. & McNaughton, D. (2014) Communicative Competence for Individuals who require Augmentative and Alternative Communication: A New Definition for a New Era of Communication?, Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 30:1, 1-18, DOI: 10.3109/07434618.2014.885080
    Schlosser, R. W., Koul, R., & Costello, J. (2007). Asking well-built questions for evidence-based practice in augmentative and alternative communication. Journal of Communication Disorders, 40(3), 225-238. doi:10.1016/j.jcomdis.2006.06.008
    Shane, H., & Costello, J. (1994, November). Augmentative communication assessment and the feature matching process. Mini-seminar presented at the annual convention of the American Speech-LanguageHearing Association, New Orleans, LA.

    Disclosures:
    Kate Grandbois financial disclosures: Kate is the owner / founder of Grandbois Therapy + Consulting, LLC and co-founder of SLP Nerdcast.  Kate Grandbois non-financial disclosures: Kate is a member of ASHA, SIG 12, and serves on the AAC Advisory Group for Massachusetts Advocates for Children. She is also a member of the Berkshire Association for Behavior Analysis and Therapy (BABAT), MassABA, the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI) and the corresponding Speech Pathology and Applied Behavior Analysis SIG. 
    Amy Wonkka financial disclosures: Amy is an employee of a public school system and co-founder of SLP Nerdcast.  Amy Wonkka non-financial disclosures: Amy is a member of ASHA, SIG 12, and serves on the AAC Advisory Group for Massachusetts Advocates for Children. 

    Time Ordered Agenda:
    10 minutes: Introduction, Disclaimers and Disclosures
    20 minutes: Review of feature matching and descriptions of its role in the AAC assessment process
    15 minutes: Review of the components of a comprehensive AAC assessment
    10 minutes: Review of client considerations when conducting a comprehensive AAC assessment
    5 minutes: Summary and Closing

    Disclaimer
    The contents of this episode are not meant to replace clinical ad

    • 1 hr 30 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
34 Ratings

34 Ratings

Start yesterday ,

Amazingly Easy

Love that this is an easy listen to real talk that is really helpful! The energy and relationship between the hosts is just right, and the content lives in the sweet spot, distilling complex concepts through conversation so that there are clinically relevant take-homes. AND FREE/CHEAP CMHs!?!?!

Joanna Hallmark ,

Accessible, Informative, Practical

Thank you for making this excellent, research-based learning opportunity that is both extremely accessible and affordable. This is the best kind of PD: it’s 1 hour at a time so that I can learn and then have time to synthesize and apply; it provides information I can apply to my practice immediately; and I can listen and learn while I drive, fold laundry, etc. Thanks for the research and resources!

oldSLP ,

Best SLP Podcast

Easy to listen to. Super informative. Knowledge can be put to use immediately. Thank you both for doing the research and sharing.

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