100 episodes

Looking for art career inspiration and ideas while you’re working in the studio or schlepping your art across the country? Alyson Stanfield helps you be a more productive artist, a more empowered artist, and a more successful artist.

The Art Biz Alyson Stanfield

    • Arts
    • 4.8 • 123 Ratings

Looking for art career inspiration and ideas while you’re working in the studio or schlepping your art across the country? Alyson Stanfield helps you be a more productive artist, a more empowered artist, and a more successful artist.

    Play Tops Work, Connection Tops Solitude, and Confidence Tops Fear with Willie Cole (#126)

    Play Tops Work, Connection Tops Solitude, and Confidence Tops Fear with Willie Cole (#126)

    There’s always plenty to be learned from artists who have been making a go of it for decades. Just think about how much has changed in 30 years! In this episode of The Art Biz, my guest is Willie Cole, a self-described perceptual engineer with an impressive list of collaborations under his belt and even more in the works. Together we talk about the faith he has in his work as a result of being consistent throughout the years. And why he says work is a bad word and prefers to approach his studio in the spirit of play.
    We discussed his art and why he challenges people to perceive recognizable objects, like shoes and musical instruments, in new ways. You’ll hear how one of his Instagram posts — where he mocked up his art as if to appear on the cover of Vogue — led to collaborations with major fashion brands. Such opportunities continue coming his way, which might be the result of his faith in his practice. Spoiler: Visualizing success plays a role.
    Highlights
    Willie calls himself a perceptual engineer, but what exactly does that mean? (3:12)
    The importance (if any) of showing the materials Willie uses to create his work, including 75 cut-up guitars. (5:35)
    “Planning makes it feel too much like a job.” How Willie approaches his work instead. (11:02)
    A peek inside Willie’s studio. (13:58)
    Work is a bad word, but play can make your business better every day. (15:55)
    Staying in a playful mindset in every stage of production. (19:15)
    The value of improvisation and the value of not knowing everything. (21:08)
    Willie feels like the luckiest business person in America. (23:40)
    The business-minded people that makeup Willie’s team and insights into his collaborations. (25:36)
    Propelling yourself forward in spite of your fears. (35:24)
    The difference between fashion industry collaborations and gallery relationships. (37:51)
    The music on Willie’s current playlist and what is coming up next in his work. (40:28)
     
    Mentioned
    Willie’s collaboration with Tod’s
    Willie’s collaboration with Comme des Garçons
    Armando Cabral
    Money Good by Megan Thee Stallion
    Joan Armatrading concert on YouTube
    Vogue covers by Black artists
     
    The Art Biz Connection
    The Wildly Productive Get Organized Challenge for Your Art Biz
     
    Resources
    Show notes, images, and listener comments
    How to Price Your Art free report
    Art Biz Connection artist membership
     
    Quotes
    “Play is play, and the opposite of play, I guess, would be work.” — Willie Cole
    “It becomes work rather than play when it becomes a money-making business.” — Willie Cole
    “Knowing has limitations because once you find something, you only see it as that.” — Willie Cole
    “I feel like the luckiest business person in America.” — Willie Cole
    “When passion marries intention and it can be monetized, it’s work but it’s also just joy.” — Willie Cole
    “To proceed with confidence and fearlessness, I have to believe that opportunities connect.” — Willie Cole
    “Connections open up so many doors, they keep the fear way behind me.” — Willie Cole
     
    Guest Bio
    Willie Cole calls himself a perceptual engineer. Whether he is using the symbolism of a steam iron or the shapes of high fashion shoes and recognizable musical instruments, he challenges how we look at things. While he has had solo exhibitions at esteemed institutions such as the Museum of Modern Art, Miami Art Museum, and Montclair Art Museum, Willie embraces nontraditional avenues for his work, such as collaborations with major fashion brands. He is represented by Alexander and Bonin Gallery in New York, Maus Contemporary Gallery (Alabama), Gavlak Gallery (Los Angeles/Florida), and Kavi Gupta Gallery (Chicago). Willie lives and works in New Jersey.

    • 50 min
    How to Legally Protect Your Creative Work with Kathryn Goldman (#125)

    How to Legally Protect Your Creative Work with Kathryn Goldman (#125)

    I can’t resist legal cases about art, from thefts and forgeries to copyright infringement to gallery dealers and so-called experts who end up in front of a judge for defrauding collectors. While most artists will never see the inside of a courtroom, you might be concerned with copyright infringement or receive unsettling news that someone is using your creative work without your permission. Every artist (you) should know the basics for protecting their art. In this episode of The Art Biz, I am joined by Kathryn Goldman, an intellectual property and internet law attorney who helps creative professionals protect their work so they can profit from it. She is the founder of The Creative Law Center website and membership program, which offers understandable information, actionable strategies, and easy to use tools for the development of creative businesses. Our conversation focuses around Kathryn’s Four Step Framework to help you identify, protect, monitor, and enforce your creative rights.
    Highlights
    Kathryn is an intellectual property attorney who helps creative professionals protect their copyrights, trademarks and brilliant business ideas. (2:45)
    The four step framework that helps artists know what, when and how to take action. (4:45)
    Copyright 101- identify the rights that a copyright protects and what is not covered. (7:13)
    Protect your artwork with a copyright registration. (12:25)
    Filing in small claims court for infringement can result in $15,000 payout. (15:33)
    Trademarks are source identifiers that protect against consumer confusion. (18:31)
    Keith Haring, Banksy, and other famous artist trademarks. (21:00)
    Does an artist need to register a copyright for every single thing they make? (30:35)
    Protection is the combination of copyright, trademark, and contract. (33:05)
    FARE contracts keep the right to control a piece in the hands of the artist. (35:09)
    Artists with a secondary market stand to benefit greatly from a FARE contract. (39:10)
    Monitoring your work to determine if it’s been stolen is up to you (and your tribe). (41:30)
    How I handled copyright infringement of my writing. (46:24)
    The ladder of enforcement offers options for reaction when someone is stealing your work. (49:55)
    The recipe for registering your most valuable work is essential. (57:07)
    Kathryn’s upcoming programs and workshops. (59:05)
     
    Mentioned
    Copyright Claims Board
    Google Alerts
    FARE Contract
    Kathryn Goldman’s Creative Law Center
     
    The Art Biz Connection
    Grow Your List
     
    Resources
    Show notes, images, and listener comments
    How to Price Your Art free report
    Art Biz Connection artist membership
     
    Quotes
    “I like it when artists understand when they need to take action, what action they need to take, and how to do it effectively and efficiently.” — Kathryn Goldman
    “The right to control those kinds of changes to the art comes from the copyright.” — Kathryn Goldman
    “A lot of working artists have trademarks, especially those who are building a business on licensing their art.” — Kathryn Goldman
    “Copyright is not as strong as trademark, and trademark is not as strong as a good contract.” — Kathryn Goldman
    “With this combination of tools, I think we really are going to start seeing some interesting things happen with contracts in the art world.” — Kathryn Goldman
    “The best infringement protection is going to be your tribe.” — Kathryn Goldman
     
     
    Guest Bio
    Kathryn Goldman is an intellectual property and internet law attorney who helps creative professionals protect their work so they can profit from it. She believes sustainable businesses are built on properly protected creative assets. Kathryn runs the Creative Law Center website and membership program. The Creative Law Center provides innovative creatives with the affordable business and legal resources they need when evolving from artist to entre

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Being an Artist with Geoffrey Gorman (#124)

    Being an Artist with Geoffrey Gorman (#124)

    An artist’s best resource is another artist. And to really know what a real artist’s life looks like on a daily basis, you have to study and talk to those artists. You can read their biographies, watch their videos, and listen to them on podcasts, including this one. In this episode of The Art Biz, I talk with Geoffrey Gorman about what it’s like to be a working artist, an identity he came to later in life and has sustained for nearly two decades. Geoffrey and I discuss his background as a furniture maker, gallery dealer, and artist consultant and how each role has contributed to his life as an artist. He also reveals how he approaches his work, where he finds inspiration, his take on how the art world is changing, and his advice to artists in the rapidly-evolving market.
    Highlights
    “You can make something from anything.” The evolution of Geoffrey’s process. (2:35)
    Journeying back into the arts after a 30-year break. (8:45)
    Geoffrey’s timeline from furniture maker to gallery dealer, artist coach to full-time artist. (11:08)
    What does being an artist look like in Geoffrey’s material-driven world? (16:02)
    Carving a whale and honoring the passing of time. (23:21)
    Tactics for increasing your credibility as an artist. (28:02)
    Evolving with the demands of a constantly changing art world. (31:16)
    Navigating your relationships with dealers. (36:02)
    Feedback worth soliciting as an artist. (38:55)
    The importance of connections as a small business owner. (43:00)
    How can artists utilize social media to find collectors and curators? (48:00)
    A look at where Geoffrey is putting his efforts next. (50:22)
     
    Mentioned
    Geoffrey Gorman
    Geoffrey on Instagram
    Lewallen Galleries
    Allan Houser Estate
    Valley of the Temples in Agrigento, Sicily, Italy
     
    The Art Biz Connection
    Optimize Your Online Marketing
     
    Resources
    Show notes, images, and listener comments
    How to Price Your Art free report
    Art Biz Connection artist membership
     
    Quotes
    “I realized I had to create this world that I was producing.” — Geoffrey Gorman
    “You are the number one expert about your work in the world.” — Geoffrey Gorman
    “A lot of old benchmarks are now gone for artists.” — Geoffrey Gorman
    “There are so many opportunities for us as artists out there.” — Geoffrey Gorman
    “Your best resource is another artist.” — Geoffrey Gorman
     
    Guest Bio
    Geoffrey Gorman was born in Paris, France, but eventually moved to and grew up on an old horse farm in the countryside near Baltimore, Maryland. The dilapidated architecture and abandoned quarries of his childhood influence and inspire the found material sculptures the artist creates today. Gorman has worked as a contemporary furniture designer, gallery dealer, curator, and art consultant before becoming a full-time professional artist. He has exhibited nationally and internationally, including in China and South Korea. Gorman’s work is in public and private collections, including the Racine Art Museum and the University of Colorado.

    • 53 min
    Qualities Galleries Are Looking For in Their Artists with Jeremy Tessmer (#123)

    Qualities Galleries Are Looking For in Their Artists with Jeremy Tessmer (#123)

    If you have ever wanted to shoot the breeze with a gallerist, you will want to pay close attention to this episode of The Art Biz. I’m joined today by Jeremy Tessmer, the gallery director at Sullivan Goss Gallery in Santa Barbara, California. In our conversation, Jeremy shares his views of artist’s professionalism, what he thinks of online platforms, and how he taught himself art history (and why that was important to him).
    Jeremy describes Sullivan Goss as an on-ramp for collectors and artists—one that connects their roster of local, regional, national, and international artists. You’ll hear him discuss 3 qualities that he looks for in artists, two of which are non-negotiable, and how he views the artists in his gallery as a family. He says that “dealers should have some sense of responsibility for the well-being of their artists,” and, as you listen to our conversation, you’ll understand why that has become so important to him.
    Highlights
    The niche that the Sullivan Goss Gallery fills and Jeremy’s role within it. (2:37)
    Sullivan Goss is an on-ramp gallery with the aim of expanding the art world. (7:49)
    The different art world need to become more aware of each other. (10:05)
    Jeremy’s journey from writer and tech specialist to art gallerist. (14:04)
    Is it important for artists to be steeped in art history? (23:34)
    Overcoming the anxiety of influence to connect with other artists. (26:21)
    The 3 qualities Jeremy looks for in the artists he represents. (33:30)
    The responsibility a gallery has for nurturing its artists’ careers. (36:10)
    The value of understanding the long game and defining your real interest in an artist’s career. (41:11)
    Things an artist should never say or do to gain the attention of a gallerist. (46:18)
     
    Mentioned
    Sullivan Goss Gallery
    Alfred Stieglitz’s Gallery- An American Place
    Milton Avery exhibition at The Wadsworth Atheneum
    David Zwirner’s Platform
    Harold Bloom’s Anxiety of Influence
    Susan McDonnell Art
    Sullivan Goss on Instagram @sullivangoss
    Jeremy Tessmer Arts on Instagram @jeremyarts
     
    The Art Biz Connection
    Optimize Your Online Marketing
     
    Resources
    Show notes, images, and listener comments
    How to Price Your Art free report
    Art Biz Connection artist membership
     
    Guest Bio
    Jeremy Tessmer is the Gallery Director and Curator of vintage American art at Sullivan Goss. He has been with the firm almost 20 years, working in every area of the business, including: curation, sales, marketing, and design of everything from exhibition spaces to internal databases and processes. He has special knowledge of the American Modern movement, especially as it occurred on the West Coast. He has also been heavily involved with the gallery’s publication program, helping to produce nineteen books and numerous catalogs, including those on local artists Ray Strong and Hank Pitcher.
     

    • 50 min
    How Do You Know if a Class or Workshop is Right for You? (#122)

    How Do You Know if a Class or Workshop is Right for You? (#122)

    The resources you have for art business and career development are endless. In that respect, you are incredibly fortunate compared to artists of the past who had so little to help them make a go of it. And there is a downside. There are so many choices to grow as a professional artist that it’s difficult to decide where to spend your time and money. 
    How do you decide? How do you know when to invest, and when to save your money?
    Let’s pretend you are my coaching client and you’re debating adding something to your calendar. I caution all students and clients to be judicious about adding more to their already full schedules. 
    This episode is focused on the questions I’d ask to help you decide whether or not a program is right for you. These include ...
    What do you want to get from this program?
    Is this program a shiny distraction?
    Are you in a place to receive the guidance?
    Do you respect the presenters, teachers, or leaders?
    How is this program different?
    Are you willing to devote the time to the lessons and homework?
    See featured artists, read, and leave a comment >> TRANSCRIPT+POST
    MENTIONED
    Optimize Your Online Marketing
    The Art Biz Connection membership community
    Tom Kuegler's LinkedIn Sprint

    • 19 min
    Guaranteeing an Effective Project with Eve Jacobs-Carnahan (#121)

    Guaranteeing an Effective Project with Eve Jacobs-Carnahan (#121)

    We usually start a long-term project with a specific goal or set of expectations in mind. Rarely does the project turn out the way we thought it would. More often than not, it’s better than we had imagined. But before we can get to that point of admitting that the change might have actually led to an improvement in the original plan, we have to struggle, to question our assumptions or to ask for more help or more money. We recognize we can’t continue working in the same fashion as before, and often we are forced to adjust to outside forces, like a worldwide pandemic. In this episode of The Art Biz, I’m joined again by Eve Jacobs-Carnahan. She was a podcast guest over a year ago and has come back to offer an update on her project, Knit Democracy Together, which was developed to discuss the U.S. electoral system within the context of knitting circles.
    Today Eve is sharing a look at how such a long-term project evolves. She outlines the 5 indicators she is using to measure effectiveness, and even if you don’t have an art project focused on making a social impact, these indicators will be useful for appraising the successful reach of your exhibition, event, program, or teaching.
    Highlights
    “It all took on a new significance.” Eve’s project changed after the 2020 election. (4:27)
    The reasons behind improvements in the knitting circle. (8:11)
    The mindset shift that created positive changes to the project format. (10:02)
    Eve’s preparation helped secure her fellowship. (11:41)
    Collaboration changes and letting go of tight control over the project. (13:28)
    The topics that the project covers now are not the same as the initial intended ones. (19:25)
    5 indicators to measure effectiveness in any project. (24:44)
    Applying these tools to measure other areas of success. (31:40)
    A look at what’s coming next for Eve. (36:40)
    The evolution of Eve’s expanded exhibition. (39:11)
     
    Mentioned
    The Art Biz ep. 64: Knit Democracy Together (first interview with Eve)
    Priya Parker’s The Art of Gathering book
    National Arts Strategies Creative Community Fellows
    New England Foundation for the Arts Public Art Grants
    LBJ speech introducing Voting Rights Act in 1965
    Eve Jacobs-Carnahan
    Knit Democracy Together
     
    The Art Biz Connection
    Join Optimize Your Online Marketing starting May 26, 2022
     
    Resources
    Show notes, images, and listener comments
    How to Price Your Art free report
    Art Biz Connection artist membership
     
    Quotes
    “I have definitely let go of some control, and that’s been good.” — Eve Jacobs-Carnahan
    “I realized that I wasn’t going to be as effective by myself.” — Eve Jacobs-Carnahan
    “I’m talking about what people can do to help strengthen the system so we don’t have chaos, all while knitting.” — Eve Jacobs-Carnahan
    “Change can happen step by step, stitch by stitch and with many people working together.” — Eve Jacobs-Carnahan
    “Artists who want to do social impact work definitely can be using these tools.” — Eve Jacobs-Carnahan
    “Think about the people you know, think about your relationships with them, and be willing to ask for help.” — Eve Jacobs-Carnahan
     
    Guest Bio
     
    Eve Jacobs-Carnahan makes mixed media knitted sculpture exploring democracy. She uses the comforting quality of yarn and the charming attraction of birds to tell allegorical stories.
     
    Eve’s work appears in Astounding Knits! 101 Spectacular Knitted Creations and Daring Feats by Lela Nargi and garnered First Place in National Fiber Directions 2015 at the Wichita Center for the Arts. She was named a Creative Community Fellow: New England by National Arts Strategies in 2021.
     
    Eve knit away stress while earning a B.A. in History with Honors from Swarthmore College and a J.D. from the University of Chicago. She lives in Vermont.
    First posted: https://artbizsuccess.com/effective-projects-carnahan-podcast

    • 45 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
123 Ratings

123 Ratings

Justin John ,

You’re missing out if you’re not listening

The topics and information discussed by Alyson and her guests in this podcast are what every artist to stand a chance of making it in this business of art. She breaks subjects down in approachable ways to understand and then go off and tackle.

Thank you for this podcast. It’s one of my go-to’s while I’m in the studio. 😃

Yy26 ,

Love it !

I’ve maybe listened to about six of these podcasts. I’m really loving them and look forward to hearing more ! Very interesting and informative. I highly recommend them

Carriejp ,

Vital information

Alyson’s podcast always provides vital information for the working artist who wants to develop and grow. Thank you Alyson

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