11 episodes

Stories on why we find it so hard to save our own planet, and how we might change that.

The Climate Question BBC

    • Science
    • 5.0 • 21 Ratings

Stories on why we find it so hard to save our own planet, and how we might change that.

    Does Africa have a voice on climate?

    Does Africa have a voice on climate?

    Ugandan activist Vanessa Nakate is on a mission to make sure Africa is listened to on climate justice.

    In early 2019 she started taking to the streets of Kampala to protest about climate change. It was a lonely pursuit. She was often on her own, or at best with a couple of her siblings or friends. But she quickly started gaining recognition, and has since spoken at the UN and Davos.

    However, a year ago she was thrust into the spotlight for all the wrong reasons when the Associated Press cut her out of a photo with four other white youth climate activists at an international climate conference. That painful experience has since informed her activism and role within the climate movement: "We will not have climate justice without social and racial justice", she says.

    So, of all the problems the African continent is facing, why did she choose to raise her voice on climate change - and is anybody listening?

    • 24 min
    Jakarta: A warning?

    Jakarta: A warning?

    As sea levels rise due to global warming, what does the future hold for our coasts?

    Already threatened by rising tides, Jakarta, the capital of Indonesia, is in a perilous situation - it is sinking. We join reporter Resty Woro Yuniar on a crumbling sea wall to hear the reality of living under sea level, and speak with the engineer responsible for fighting flooding from both the sea and the mountains. We hear about plans to abandon the city as a capital, and try again on drier land.

    Author Jeff Goddell describes being next to the glacier that could show just how high the oceans could rise. Solutions in the past have involved building our way out of this problem, but some locations will be too expensive to save. Is Jakarta a warning to us all?

    • 26 min
    A year to save the world

    A year to save the world

    Five years ago, there was widespread celebration after world leaders signed up to the Paris Agreement. However, despite pledging to pursue efforts to limit global warming to just 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels, emissions have continued to rise. Many are saying the COP26 conference in late 2021, where world leaders will meet again, is a make-or-break moment to turn words into action. What needs to be achieved? What is the cost of failure? And where are the signs of hope for success?

    Justin Rowlatt and Navin Singh Khadka talk to Laurence Tubiana, CEO of the European Climate Foundation (ECF), who was previously France’s climate change ambassador and special representative for COP21, and a key architect of the landmark Paris Agreement. They are also joined by Christiana Figuerres, who was Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) between 2010 and 2016, and Dr Emily Shuckburgh, director of Cambridge Zero at the University of Cambridge, and reader in environmental data science at the Department of Computer Science and Technology.

    Producer: Zak Brophy
    Researcher: Soila Apparicio
    Editor: Ravin Sampat
    Sound Design: David Crackles

    • 26 min
    2020: A year of extremes

    2020: A year of extremes

    Not only has this year been one of the hottest on record, but there has also been a catalogue of record breaking extreme weather events. From the unprecedented bush fires in Australia to the most active Atlantic hurricane season on record, we pick apart how climate change is impacting weather systems and the lives of millions of people around the world.

    Justin Rowlatt, the BBC’s Chief Environment Correspondent, and Navin Singh Khadkha, the multi-lingual environment correspondent for the BBC’s World Service, are joined by Dr Friederike Otto, associate director of the Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford, and an associate professor in the Global Climate Science Programme; Prof Adam Scaife, the head of long range forecasting at the UK's Met Office; and Laura Meller, a Greenpeace spokeswoman on board their ship the Arctic Sunrise.

    Producer: Zak Brophy
    Researcher: Soila Apparicio
    Editor: Ravin Sampat
    Sound Design: David Crackles

    • 26 min
    Are Catholics ignoring the Pope on climate change?

    Are Catholics ignoring the Pope on climate change?

    In 2015, Pope Francis asked Catholics the world over to protect our planet. But five years on, with emissions and extinctions rising, what difference has it made? And have any other religions followed suit?

    For answers, Neal and Graihagh are joined by two leading voices on the environment: Christiana Figueres, who helped the world reach the Paris Climate Agreement, and Cardinal Peter Turkson, the Pope’s leading climate advisor.

    They’ll hear evidence from Poland, a Catholic country that runs on coal and where Church leaders are not always in step with the Vatican’s teaching on the environment. They’ll also assess the global impact of the Pope’s green push, and talk about the role of faith in fighting climate change.

    Produced by Anna Meisel and Eleanor Biggs
    Editor: Ravin Sampat.
    Sound Design: Tom Brignall

    • 29 min
    The secret solution to climate change

    The secret solution to climate change

    If we educate and empower girls and young women, they are likely to have more control over their fertility. And with fewer people on the planet, it becomes the number one climate change solution. But it’s more complicated than it sounds, and not without controversy.

    Experts: Christina Kwauk, a fellow in the Center for Universal Education at Brookings, and Paul Hawken, founder of Project Drawdown

    Reporter: Ashley Lime
    Producer: Jordan Dunbar
    Researcher: Eleanor Biggs
    Editor: Ravin Sampat
    Sound mixer: Tom Brignell

    • 26 min

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