300 episodes

Brilliant solutions to the world’s problems. We meet people with ideas to make the world a better place and investigate whether they work.

People Fixing the World BBC World Service

    • News
    • 4.8 • 199 Ratings

Brilliant solutions to the world’s problems. We meet people with ideas to make the world a better place and investigate whether they work.

    The World Cup of football solutions

    The World Cup of football solutions

    As the World Cup kicks off in Qatar, we look at the initiatives around the world which are using football as a way to solve problems off the pitch.

    We meet the people using the beautiful game to support men with their mental health in the UK, bring people together after conflict in Iraq and build the confidence of girls in the Netherlands.

    Presenter: Myra Anubi

    Reporters: Jo Casserly and Craig Langran
    Series producer: Tom Colls
    Sound mix: Hal Haines
    Editor: Emma Rippon

    Email: peoplefixingtheworld@bbc.co.uk

    Image: Roxanne ‘Rocky’ Hehakaija

    • 24 min
    Jobs for girls

    Jobs for girls

    How hard is it for women to break into male-dominated jobs?
    We look at two projects which are helping women to increase their earnings by training them in forms of work that have traditionally been done by men.
    In Uganda, we meet the woman training girls in careers from mechanical engineering and welding to carpentry and construction
    And in India, we visit the college that trains impoverished women from around the world in the nuts and bolts of solar technology.
    As well as the economic benefits, by challenging the status quo these projects are also aiming to empower women and change society.

    Presenter: Myra Anubi
    Reporter/Producer: Farhana Haider
    India Reporter: Chhavi Sachdev
    Series producer: Tom Colls
    Sound Mix: Hal Haines
    Editor: Penny Murphy

    Email: peoplefixingtheworld@bbc.co.uk

    Image: Smart Girls Uganda students working on a car, Kampala.

    • 25 min
    COP27: Growing a forest the right way

    COP27: Growing a forest the right way

    Tree-planting schemes don’t always work, so what’s the best way to do forest restoration?

    Projects around the world are planting huge numbers of trees as part of the fight against climate change. But not all of these schemes are successful – leaving dead saplings and wasted money in their wake. People Fixing the World works out how to do it right.

    In West Africa, we look at how farmers have reforested and restored huge areas without planting a single seed. In Brazil, we visit a project that has planted more than 600,000 trees in the endangered Atlantic Forest.

    Myra Anubi also hears about new satellite technology which can help us map reforestation across the world, to give a clearer picture of what is and isn’t working when it comes to growing trees.

    Presenter: Myra Anubi
    Reporter: Julia Carneiro
    Producers: Zoe Gelber and William Kremer
    Series producer: Tom Colls
    Sound mix: Hal Haines
    Editor: Penny Murphy

    Email: peoplefixingtheworld@bbc.co.uk

    Image: A sapling (Getty Images)

    • 24 min
    Picking up healthcare with the litter

    Picking up healthcare with the litter

    Would you pick up litter if your life depended on it?

    Around the world, companies and governments are trying to incentivise people to pick up litter and recycle their waste.

    In Nigeria, we visit the tech start-up which encourages people to pick rubbish up off the street – and then swaps the plastic bottles, cartons and metals they collect for potentially life-saving healthcare.

    And in Turkey, we meet the mayor on a mission to get his residents recycling, by exchanging their household waste for points that earn them money.

    Presenter: Myra Anubi
    Reporters: Craig Langran and Kareemot Salami
    Producer: Jo Casserly
    Series producer: Tom Colls
    Sound mix: Hal Haines
    Editor: Penny Murphy

    Email: peoplefixingtheworld@bbc.co.uk
    Image: Recycling in Turkey

    • 23 min
    Albatrosses and oysters fixing the world

    Albatrosses and oysters fixing the world

    Giant seabirds and shellfish are being used to help protect our planet.

    On an tiny island in the remote Southern Ocean, a French researcher wanted to find out why so many birds were being killed by fishing boats.

    By attaching radar loggers to Albatrosses, he inadvertently invented a powerful method for tracking down illegal vessels.

    And in New Orleans in the US, a restaurant owner is recycling tonnes of old oyster shells.

    They’re being put back in the ocean to protect the shoreline and create new reefs so more oysters can grow.

    Presenter: Myra Anubi
    Reporter: Anna Adams
    Producer: Zoe Gelber
    Series producer: Tom Colls
    Sound mix: Hal Haines
    Editor: Penny Murphy

    Email: peoplefixingtheworld@bbc.co.uk
    Image: An albatross (Getty Images)

    • 24 min
    Educating refugees

    Educating refugees

    How do you help young displaced people get a better start in life?

    Young people who become refugees often have their education disrupted – which can have a serious impact on their future prospects. But we find out about two schemes that are trying to help.

    In Jordan, a charity has developed a high school curriculum specifically aimed at young people who are displaced. Amala enables 16-25 year olds to complete their secondary education, and also develop skills that will help their community.

    And when it comes to further education another organisation in Canada has been helping young refugees. The Student Refugee Program run by the World University Service help them to study at Canadian universities and then settle in the country. We speak to a student who’s been through the scheme, and to one of the volunteers who helped them.

    Presenter: Myra Anubi
    Reporter: Lucy Burns
    Additional production: Craig Langran
    Series producer: Tom Colls
    Sound mix: Gareth Jones

    Editor: Penny Murphy

    Email: peoplefixingtheworld@bbc.co.uk

    Image: Amala graduates in Kenya, (Credit: Chol Ghai Angeth)

    • 24 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
199 Ratings

199 Ratings

midwestBlue ,

9.13

fake meat. i have eaten fake meat for a while and then i quit eating it due to the fact it is all so high in sodium. too much sodium. please solve that.

Arlie K ,

Inspiring and Engaging!

I'm obsessed with this show!! Every episode shines a light on positive and empowering concepts from people who are making a difference. Not to mention, the audio design is absolutely top-notch. Highly recommend!

Eme@Kenya ,

Excellent podcast!

Great content. You have been able to present topics that are interesting to me as a parent along with my 11 and 8 year old. We listen to this on the way to school. The content provides me with lots of nuggets for teaching moments for them. For example, the other day we were speaking about supply, demand and prices. The gig workers episode was a perfect way to get them to understand how the 3 impact each other. And I learned a ton myself! Keep up the good work.

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