300 episodes

Download the latest documentaries investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

The Documentary Podcast BBC

    • History
    • 4.4 • 1.3K Ratings

Download the latest documentaries investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

    Coronavirus: Festive celebrations

    Coronavirus: Festive celebrations

    The arrival of winter for many countries brings the threat of increased infections as people gather indoors to escape the cold. It’s also a time for celebrating religious festivals and holidays. Host Nuala McGovern shares conversations with an American family in Indiana about Thanksgiving, and two young women in Gaza relate their experiences of curfew during the pandemic. Plus, three people living in Japan discuss why they think cases are rising, the implications for Japanese New Year and whether the Olympics should still go ahead in 2021.

    • 23 min
    The Mapuche – fighting for their right to heal

    The Mapuche – fighting for their right to heal

    The Mapuche are Chile’s largest indigenous group – a population of more than 2 million people. And, they are fighting for their right to heal. They want Chileans to value their unique approach to healthcare and give them control of land and their own destiny. But, it’s a tough sell when there’s so much distrust and violence between the two communities. Jane Chambers travels to their homeland in the Araucania region in the south of Chile, where she’s given rare access to traditional healers and political leaders.

    Presenter / producer: Jane Chambers
    Producer in London: Linda Pressly
    Editor: Bridget Harney

    (Image: Machi Juana at her home by her sacred altar. Credit: Jane Chambers/BBC)

    • 26 min
    Don't Log Off: Resilience

    Don't Log Off: Resilience

    Throughout the pandemic Alan Dein has been hearing inspiring and moving accounts of how people’s lives have been transformed by the pandemic. Today, Alan connects with Sakie in Myanmar, who tells of a heroic 24-hour journey from his remote village in order to save his mother’s life. He also catches up with Maria Ester in Ecuador, who he first spoke to six months ago when it looked as if her family business was on the verge of collapse. Alan also connects with Mursalina in Afghanistan, Mohammed in Gaza and wildlife photographer Jahawi who describes the wonders of the underwater world.

    • 27 min
    100 Women: The mushroom woman

    100 Women: The mushroom woman

    This is the story of Chido Govera aka The Mushroom Woman. It is a story about her home, Zimbabwe. And it is also a story about mushrooms. It never should have happened. Chido, an orphan, became the provider in her family aged seven. At 10 she was destined to marry a man 30 years older than her. But a chance encounter led her to discover the almost magical science of mushroom cultivation at a local university, and set her life on a very different course.

    • 27 min
    Coronavirus: Mental and physical toll

    Coronavirus: Mental and physical toll

    Women in Ecuador, Peru and Brazil reveal the frightening effect of the pandemic and lockdowns on women in Latin America. Many are living with their aggressors and are unable to escape to a safe place. Many countries are now dealing with a new rise in coronavirus cases. Host Nuala McGovern hears from medical professionals from Madrid, Paris and New York, as they share how the stress of dealing with patients is taking its toll on the mental health of doctors, nurses and paramedics. Plus, two Swedes offer different views on how the outbreak has been handled in their country.

    • 24 min
    Martinique: The poisoning of paradise

    Martinique: The poisoning of paradise

    “First we were enslaved. Then we were poisoned.” That’s how many on Martinique see the history of their French Caribbean island that, to tourists, means sun, rum, and palm-fringed beaches. Slavery was abolished in 1848. But today the islanders are victims again – of a toxic pesticide called chlordecone that’s poisoned the soil and water and been linked by scientists to unusually high rates of prostate cancer. For more than 10 years chlordecone was authorised for use in banana plantations – though its harmful effects were already known. Now, more than 90% of Martinicans have traces of it in their blood. The pollution means many can't grow vegetables in their gardens - and fish caught close to the shore are too dangerous to eat. French President Emmanuel Macron has called it an ‘environmental scandal’ and said the state ‘must take responsibility’. But some activists on the island want to raise wider questions about why the pesticide was used for so long – and on an island divided between a black majority and a small white minority, it’s lost on no-one that the banana farmers who used the toxic chemical and still enjoy considerable economic power are, in many cases, descendants of the slave owners who once ran Martinique. Reporting from the island for Assignment, Tim Whewell asks how much has changed there. Is Martinique really an equal part of France? And is there equality between descendants of slaves and the descendants of their masters, even now?

    Produced and presented by Tim Whewell
    Editor, Bridget Harney

    (Image: Sunset on a beach in Martinique. Credit: DeAgostini/Getty Images)

    • 26 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
1.3K Ratings

1.3K Ratings

Bibiyas ,

Reza’s Story

Your program is so wonderful. Reza’s story has a happy ending but there are so many refugees stuck in Lesbos..when will the governments of our world wake up and stop treating their citizens and especially these refugees as garbage!!??

Jbecker987 ,

Misrepresenting US thinking

Responding to election episode.....I don’t understand why you are giving these conspiracy theorists who are hypocritically interpreting the results of the election which are the mirror image of the result in the trump /Clinton elections this much oxygen. Everything they said is right out of the MAGA handbook 77 M Americans have not been brainwashed by Fox News and Qanon and your lack of meaningful pushback with facts is disappointing. The young lady who finally stood up was the lone breath of fresh air. Need to do better!

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sdweller ,

Real news

This podcast is a breath of fresh air during a time when so much news/info is so biased. Real stories presented in a fair and balanced way, fantastic!

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