52 episodes

Analysing and contextualising podcasts from a Media and Cultural Studies standpoint. Produced and hosted by Dario Llinares (@dariodoublel) and Lori Beckstead (@lbeckste).

The Podcast Studies Podcast (formerly New Aural Cultures‪)‬ Dario Llinares & Lori Beckstead

    • Education

Analysing and contextualising podcasts from a Media and Cultural Studies standpoint. Produced and hosted by Dario Llinares (@dariodoublel) and Lori Beckstead (@lbeckste).

    Robert Gutsche - The J Word Podcast

    Robert Gutsche - The J Word Podcast

    Robert Gutsche, is a leading scholar in the field of Journalism Studies where he applies critical cultural theory to investigate issues of power in journalism. He is a Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) in Critical Digital Media Practice at Lancaster University in the UK and Visiting Professor in the Faculty of Informatics at Vytautas Magnus University in Lithuania. As a journalist, his work appeared in The Washington Post, the Chicago Tribune, the Guardian, and various other regional and local news outlets in the U.S. Gutsche has led digital innovation related to multimedia journalism, including through the use of virtual reality and other immersive media in storytelling and research at Florida International University in Miami, as well as dynamic storytelling at the University of Missouri’s Reynolds Journalism Institute, and non-profit news collaborations with the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Iowa.

    As host and producer of The J-Word Podcast Robert ask, from a range of perspectives, what is journalism? How can we make it better? What does "better" look like? The podcast features discussions with academics and professionals who've published recently in Journalism Practice. The focus of the conversations includes assessing the transformations of advancing digital technologies in journalism, social issues and conditions that journalists (need to) cover, and the future of the field. Articles featured in the episodes are temporarily made free access for citizens, journalists, scholars, and students. While the discussions are rooted in research, they are approached to influence practice.  

    Dario introduces the show by ruminating on what the recent events with regards to Joe Rogan and Spotify. What the discourse might mean podcasting in the nexus of ordinary conversation as free speech, the editorial responsibilities of institutionalised broadcasting, and how popularity and influence can contextualise those issues.


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    • 57 min
    Mack Hagood of Phantom Power: Sound Studies & Scholarly Podcasting

    Mack Hagood of Phantom Power: Sound Studies & Scholarly Podcasting

    Prof. Mack Hagood, author of Hush: Media and Sonic Self Control and producer of Phantom Power, joins Dario to discuss sound studies and scholarly podcasting. Phantom Power is a benchmark academic podcast in terms of acoustic form and scholarly depth. Its focus is on the sonic arts and humanities and the show utilises all the myriad affordances of sound to explore scholarship and sound art. Mack and Dario unpack the joys and labors of academic podcasting, discussing the production process and the relationship between theory and practice which leads to discussion of Mack's chapter "The Scholarly Podcast: Form and Function in Audio Academia" recently published in Saving New Sounds: Podcast Preservation and Historiography edited by Jeremy Wade Morris and Eric Hoyt. 

    A transcript of this episode is available here.

    Mack Hagood is an Associate Professor of Comparative Media Studies at Miami University, Ohio, where he studies digital media, sound technologies, disability, and popular music. Mack has published work on tinnitus, the use of noise-canceling headphones in air travel, the noise of fans in NFL football stadiums, indie rock in Taiwan,  the ontology of Foley and digital film sound, and the forms and functions of scholarly podcasts.

    Show Notes:

    Lori and Dario discuss Professor Steffan Garrero's 'experiment' in gaming the Apple Podcast Charts.

    These episodes of Phantom Power are mentioned in particular:


    Test Subjects with Mara Mills
    For Some Odd Reason with Kate Carr
    R. Murray Schafer: Part 1 and Part 2
    Emotional Rescue

    Mack mentions David Hendy's radio series Noise: A Human History which he uses as a text in his sound studies class.

    Mack also mentions Jennifer Stoever's book The Sonic Color Line: Race and the Cultural Politics of Listening.

    Contact Us:

    Email: podcaststudiespodcast@gmail.com

    Twitter: @podstudiespod

    Send us a voice message: anchor.fm/podcaststudiespodcast/message




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    • 1 hr 8 min
    Peer Review Podcasting Part 2: reflections

    Peer Review Podcasting Part 2: reflections

    How well do podcasts work as a medium for scholarly peer review? In the previous episode, Hannah McGregor and Ian M. Cook provided peer review on Lori Beckstead's draft chapter Context is King: Podcast Packaging and Paratexts. Now we're following up to discuss how well we think this method went. Dario Llinares leads us in a discussion about the affordances and limitations of doing scholarly peer review in the context of a podcast. Jess is also here with recommendations for a peer reviewed and a scholarly podcast.

    Be sure to listen to Peer Review Podcasting Part 1 on our podcast feed.

    A copy of the draft chapter under review can be viewed here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/e/2PACX-1vRIscCkwgjFbvaZMLdfRET-XmaF48x4rxyQj7EQcdtRGXQnWOLwogODRrMbzvyJ3_64XIkcot5IMG1u/pub

    A transcript of this episode is available here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/e/2PACX-1vRUdekT9PzeAYBpXCBm4oX7gbXeb-0jXnsLGa46RWI4qzVGpQaam9qpJ9NReEYX14kvaHXr2ORvSeni/pub

    Show Notes:

    Hannah mentions recently undergoing peer review for Kairos, a refereed online journal exploring the intersections of rhetoric, technology, and pedagogy.

    Hannah mentions speaking to Chris Friend on Hybrid Pedagogy's podcast Teacher of the Ear where they discussed 'ungrading'.

    Ian M. Cook has a book coming out soon called Scholarly Podcasting: An Insurgent, Curious Craft.

    Jess mentions Hannah's project, the Amplify Podcast Network, which is "a collaborative project dedicated to reimagining the sound of scholarship."

    She also mentions Lori's Open Peer Review Podcast which is "a demonstration of using podcasting to conduct open peer review of academic scholarship."

    Jess recommends Ted Rieken's audio piece published in the McGill Journal of Education entitled Mapping the Fit Between Research and Multimedia: A Podcast Exploration of the Place of Multimedia within/as Scholarship.

    Lori recommends also checking out the Peer Reviewer Roundtable Response to Ted Reiken's Scholarly Podcast.

    Jess also recommends the podcast Ologies by Alie Ward.

    Dario & Lori touch on Mack Hagood's chapter The Scholarly Podcast: Form and Function in Audio Academia in Saving New Sounds: Podcast Preservation and Historiography edited by Jeremy Wade Morris and Eric Hoyt.

    Dario mentions the Cinematologists' episode Knowing Sounds: Podcasting as Academic Practice, and Hannah McGregor's Secret Feminist Agenda podcast as examples which explore podcasting, scholarship, and peer review.


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    • 1 hr 1 min
    Peer Review Podcasting Part 1: a real-time peer review of scholarly work

    Peer Review Podcasting Part 1: a real-time peer review of scholarly work

    Host Lori Beckstead submits her draft chapter Context is King: Podcast Packaging and Paratexts for a real-time peer review on this podcast. Peer reviewers Hannah McGregor and Ian M. Cook give their impressions and suggestions, unpacking Lori's theoretical framework looking at the various media surrounding the podcast audio through the lens of Gerard Genette's paratext theory. We've recorded this episode as an experiment to see whether it's feasible to conduct peer review of a written manuscript in the real-time, audio-based forum of a podcast. Be prepared to laugh along the way and hear our unexpected debate when Ian asks, "Why does everyone shit on Joe Rogan?"

    Be sure to listen to the follow-up episode, Peer Review Podcasting Part 2, in which Dario asks Lori, Hannah, and Ian to reflect on the affordances and limitations of this peer review experience.

    A copy of Lori's draft chapter under review can be viewed here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/e/2PACX-1vRIscCkwgjFbvaZMLdfRET-XmaF48x4rxyQj7EQcdtRGXQnWOLwogODRrMbzvyJ3_64XIkcot5IMG1u/pub

    A transcript of this episode is available here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/e/2PACX-1vSDdF-ObzbvuTRttDjqQrgtJCozIcBRBnlxMohvusn6fphbI1Hl6G5ksG6oN1uyqXys8WFCcX8HoiB8/pub

    Hannah mentions Matthew Kirschenbaum's book Mechanisms: New Media and the Forensic Imagination

    Ian mentions Vincent Duclos' article Inhabiting Media: An Anthropology of Life at Digital Speed 


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    • 57 min
    Cross-Disciplinary Student Collaboration: Podcasting about Criminology

    Cross-Disciplinary Student Collaboration: Podcasting about Criminology

    We're excited to share a podcast submitted to us by Robin Davies, Professor of Media Studies at Vancouver Island University. Originally broadcast as a radio program on CHLY FM in Nanaimo, British Columbia, it features a series of short podcasts that were created as a cross-disciplinary assignment between Criminology students taught by Professor Lauren Mayes and Media Studies students taught by Professor Davies. Discussing diverse topics from the over-incarceration of Indigenous Peoples to the stigma surrounding drug users, these short podcasts are interspersed with reflections and feedback from the students who created them. The students tell us how the assignment was more meaningful to them because they were collaborating on work that would be broadcast and distributed as a podcast which would make their work accessible to listeners beyond the classroom. This collaborative practice exemplifies how podcasting can be utilised as a pedagogical tool to engender creative practice, critical thinking and self-reflection.

    A transcript of this episode is available here. 

    If you are interested in submitting a podcast for distribution through the Podcast Studies Podcast feed, contact us at Podcaststudiespodcast@gmail.com. Or reach out to us on Twitter @PodStudiesPod


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    • 1 hr 13 min
    Terry Lee (Fantastic Noise)

    Terry Lee (Fantastic Noise)

    In this episode, Dario talks to Terry Lee. Terry is Senior Tutor in Radio & Audio at the University of Bedfordshire and is also responsible for the award-winning Radio LaB 97.1FM. He has had a long career in independent and commercial radio including managing Norwich's Future radio. In 2018, he started Fantastic Noise a podcast primarily aimed at students studying radio, and featuring the experienced voices of radio professionals and experts. Along with talking about the formation and production of Fantastic Noise, the conversation covers how students of radio approach and understand the use of sound in the digital age, podcast and radio's symbiotic relationship, and the future of audio technology and its impact on media specificity.

    We are also taken around the podcast neighborhood by Jess Schmidt. Her recommendations this week are The Lolita Podcast from iHeart Radio and hosted by writer-comedian Jamie Loftus (My Year in Mensa) that uses the misunderstanding and infamy around Nabakov's classic as a jumping-off point for discussions of false media narratives. Also recommended is Blank Check, a film podcast that reviews successful directors' complete filmographies, getting to the point where they were given free rein to pursue a passion project.

    Lori also discusses a recent talk she gave at the Birmingham Centre for Media and Cultural Research as part of a research seminar on Podcasting, Discoverability, and Listener engagement. You can listen to the full seminar here.

    Terry also recommends The Skewer a Charlie Brooker-esque satirical comedy show with great sound production, and The Offensive, a Mockumentary series like The Office or The Thick of It in tone, but focusing on a fictional premier league football team.




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    • 1 hr 7 min