10 episodes

Workampers are adventuresome individuals, couples and families who have chosen a wonderful lifestyle that combines ANY kind of part-time or full-time work with RV camping. If you work as an employee, operate a business, or donate your time as a volunteer, AND you sleep in an RV, you are a Workamper! The Workamper Show is a podcast about workamping and the people who enjoy the lifestyle, either full-time or seasonally. It will feature interviews with current and former Workampers, as well as people who hire them to perform a wide variety of jobs. We'll even feature interviews with experienced RVers. The goal of The Workamper Show is to show people that they don't need to be retired to enjoy the RV lifestyle. We'll offer tips on getting started quickly, and making the most of the journey. Opportunities abound all over North America to work full- or part-time jobs. Some people work sales, management or customer service positions at campgrounds, tourist sites, amusement parks, wineries, farms and other public and private companies. Many Workampers accept new jobs every three to six months, which is plenty of time to immerse themselves in the culture of the area they're visiting. It's an excellent opportunity to experience a part of the country that many tourists only zip through on the way to their next destination. Perhaps they'll spend the summer in New England, enjoy the winter in Arizona, and head to the mountains the next year before venturing to Florida. Buckle up, you're about to launch a memorable adventure you've been dreaming about for years. The good news is that The Workamper Show will help you achieve your goal faster and more affordably than you imagined.

The Workamper Show Podcast Greg Gerber

    • Places & Travel
    • 4.8, 10 Ratings

Workampers are adventuresome individuals, couples and families who have chosen a wonderful lifestyle that combines ANY kind of part-time or full-time work with RV camping. If you work as an employee, operate a business, or donate your time as a volunteer, AND you sleep in an RV, you are a Workamper! The Workamper Show is a podcast about workamping and the people who enjoy the lifestyle, either full-time or seasonally. It will feature interviews with current and former Workampers, as well as people who hire them to perform a wide variety of jobs. We'll even feature interviews with experienced RVers. The goal of The Workamper Show is to show people that they don't need to be retired to enjoy the RV lifestyle. We'll offer tips on getting started quickly, and making the most of the journey. Opportunities abound all over North America to work full- or part-time jobs. Some people work sales, management or customer service positions at campgrounds, tourist sites, amusement parks, wineries, farms and other public and private companies. Many Workampers accept new jobs every three to six months, which is plenty of time to immerse themselves in the culture of the area they're visiting. It's an excellent opportunity to experience a part of the country that many tourists only zip through on the way to their next destination. Perhaps they'll spend the summer in New England, enjoy the winter in Arizona, and head to the mountains the next year before venturing to Florida. Buckle up, you're about to launch a memorable adventure you've been dreaming about for years. The good news is that The Workamper Show will help you achieve your goal faster and more affordably than you imagined.

    Lynn Hupp describes her experience in the Dreamer’s Journey class in Episode 080

    Lynn Hupp describes her experience in the Dreamer’s Journey class in Episode 080

    Today we are going to speak with a woman from Florida who just completed the new Dreamer's Journey program, and she’s going to explain what she learned that will help her launch into the Workamping lifestyle.



    A South Carolina native, Lynn Hupp has been living in central Florida since 1980. She has camped in tents for many years and already owns what she calls a bed-in-box, a tiny travel trailer big enough for a bed, an air conditioner, and a power strip – and not much else.



    She has dreamed about the RV lifestyle for many years, and two major life changes earlier this year nudged her to jump out and make that dream a reality. Yet, she still wasn’t quite confident enough in her knowledge or abilities in order to become a full-time RVer.



    So, she enrolled in the Workamper News’ new Dreamer's Journey online course designed for people like Lynn who want to soak up all the information they can about the lifestyle and the opportunities it presents. It required a minimal investment of money and some time, but she knew she’d get enough information to determine if the full-time RV lifestyle was right for her.



    Lynn is planning to launch her journey early next year. Now, she’s gathering information and checking out different types of RVs to find one that would be more suitable for full-time living.



    Ideally, she wants to find jobs that would give her an RV site and a little cash in exchange for work at a national park. She’s also thinking of becoming a certified RV inspector and doing some of those as she travels.



    Lynn describes her favorite parts of the Dreamer's Journey course, and why she found the interactive sessions to be a great way to get her questions answered.



    There was so much information presented, that she opted to renew the course and get another 12 weeks of access to the material so that she can review key parts again.



    I enjoyed listening to Lynn Hupp describe her experience of taking the new Workamper News Dreamer's Journey class. She was one of the first people to complete all 12-weeks of training.



    I really liked the “a ha” moment she described when she realized she had been telling herself that one day she was going to do this, and kept repeating that promise over and over without taking a single step toward that goal. Then, after being confronted with some life changes and an open door, Lynn realized that it was finally time for “someday” to arrive.



    One of the best decisions Lynn made was to start a notebook and jot down information, questions, and ideas she had while sitting through the sessions and talking to people. Now she has instant access to the most important information she needs to act on before going full-time.



    A lot of people may dream of full-time RVing, but as Lynn noted, there is a lot more to doing it the right way than just buying an RV, selling the house and hitting the road.



    She’s still got some questions, like those pertaining to insurance and getting healthcare on the road, and she’d really like to take the Basic RV Maintenance Course offered by the National RV Training Academy in Athens, Texas, just so she can fix problems as they come up.



    Lynn is developing not only a bucket list of places she wants to visit and things she wants to do, but now that she’s completed the Dreamer's Journey course, she is developing a plan to get it all done. The hard thing will be to decide what to do first, and where to go to start her adventure.



    I have no doubt that Lynn’s experience in the RV lifestyle will be tremendously successful and full of positive memories because she took the time to research her options early and to learn from the experiences of others.



    If you’ve been dreaming about the RV lifestyle for quite some time, but still aren’t sure if it would be the right thing for you,

    • 29 min
    In Episode 079, RV guru John Huggins offers tips and advice about RV setup

    In Episode 079, RV guru John Huggins offers tips and advice about RV setup

    Today we are going to talk with an RVing expert who has some tips and suggestions for taking the stress and hassle out of setting up an RV.



    John Huggins and his wife, Kathy, founded the Living the RV Dream group. They were full-time RVers for quite some time and were one of the pioneers in creating online communities.



    The couple also served as Workampers nearly the entire time they were on the road. So, they are very well experienced in setting up and taking down an RV, and getting ready to hit the road again.



    The key is to develop a routine, and that starts with creating a checklist that is specific to your rig and your equipment.



    There are a lot of online gurus who developed checklists, and a quick Google search will point you to several good starters. But, those checklists still need to be customized based on your own equipment.



    Like John says, “It really starts with doing your homework, knowing what you've got, what you're buying, and knowing what else you need to buy in order to be safe.”



    In this interview, John describes the routine he followed in setting up their campsites, but he also shares stories he’s heard from other people.



    Unfortunately, most people have to learn the hard way by making mistakes. It is very easy to get distracted and forget a step or two.



    John offers a lot of great advice, and it starts with talking to future employers about your RV site before you even arrive to start the job.



    His mind is a vault of valuable information, and this is a repeat appearance on The Workamper Show.



    When setting up or tearing down a campsite, the best advice John offered was to take it slowly and develop a system. Don’t let an audience or the clock rush you through your established procedures.



    I’m glad he talked about the dangers of raising an RV during the leveling process so the tires are off the ground. It really is a dangerous practice and it is so easy to get hurt or cause significant damage to the rig if the RV shifts due to wind, soft ground, gravity or movement inside the vehicle.



    Whenever you’re setting up or tearing down a campsite, it’s funny how often people will stop by to chat or distract you in some other way. That can really be problematic if your hooking up any vehicle to be towed. You might forget to attach a cable, ensure the car’s transmission is oiled up, or make sure the tow arm is properly pinned into position.



    John’s advice is to practice, practice, practice. But take time first to fully understand all the equipment you have and how it works. Then develop an itemized checklist to follow until you get the hang of setting up and taking down the RV. Even then, review the checklist every time to ensure that something wasn’t overlooked.



    John and Kathy Huggins wrote two books that are available on Amazon.com. The first, “So You Want to be an RVer,” covers everything you need to know about the RV lifestyle. It goes in to detail the steps needed to set up and take down the rig. The second book is titled, “So You Want to be a Workamper,” and explores the details of living and working from the road.



    I highly recommend both.



    You can also get started in the RV lifestyle the right way with Workamper News’ new RV Dreamers Journey online course and community. For a monthly subscription fee, people can participate in two online webinars every week and join an open question-and-answer session each month. For more information, visit www.rvdreamersjourney.com.

    • 1 hr 7 min
    Phil and Shar Roos describe their A Year to Volunteer mission in Podcast 078

    Phil and Shar Roos describe their A Year to Volunteer mission in Podcast 078

    Today, we are going to talk to the founders of the group A Year to Volunteer about ways Workampers can make a difference by getting involved in restoration projects around the country.



    Phil and Shar Roos founded A Year to Volunteer in 2018, and launched their first project earlier this year. Initially, their goal was to retire and take a year off to volunteer doing something in all 50 states. Since then, their vision has grown to help connect other volunteers with opportunities to help around the country.



    Today, their vision is to encourage everyone to volunteer to do something for 365 days over the span of their lifetimes. I suspect that will morph into something even bigger than Phil and Shar can imagine.



    Most of their work at the moment is centered around restoring trails and fixing parks that were either damaged in storms or run down due to budget challenges. But the need for help is so immense that they’ll have no problem finding projects to complete.



    Members of their group typically provide manpower while the venues supply the materials needed to complete the projects.



    For example, they just finished a six-week renovation project at Bucks Pocket State Park in Alabama. Budget cuts forced the park to close in 2015, but with everyone cooped up at home, officials really wanted to reopen it this year. As you can imagine, there was a lot of work to do to get the campground and trails ready to be reused.



    A Year to Volunteer members came in with chain saws, loppers, pruners, tractors and a skid-steer loader to recondition the park so that it could reopen in June.



    In other projects, volunteers have been involved in landscaping, painting, carpentry, pouring concrete, hanging wallpaper and even painting rocks that are then scattered around the park and on trails for people to find on fun scavenger hunts.



    There aren’t any real qualifications to be a volunteer because there is always something for someone to do that doesn’t require a lot of skill. Some states offer specific training, but most projects are completed by people who have a few hours, a few days, a week or an entire month to devote to making improvements.



    Right now, Phil and Shar just pick an area they’d like to visit, and look for opportunities to do some volunteer work nearby. Once the project is identified, they set up a schedule and alert other volunteers who help spread the word as well.



    I love the premise of A Year to Volunteer, or spending 365 days throughout an entire lifetime giving time back to local communities.



    Most government entities are in a difficult position, whether they are funded at the federal, state, county or local level.  Most agencies have reworked their budgets so that recreation fees and admissions pay for park operations. But, if the parks aren’t in good condition, people tend to stay away, which deprives the park of needed fees to maintain the facilities. The parks get caught in an endless loop of lack of funding and reduced services.



    Phil and Shar Roos are engaged in conversations with various government entities to identify projects that need to be completed. They already have three more projects planned yet this summer, and are talking to officials in three other states.



    After listening to their story, I imagine that word will spread and Phil and Shar will become full-time coordinators to act as liaisons between various projects and volunteer leaders to the point there will be dozens of projects underway at the same time across the country.



    This is a great opportunity for friends to do something together and make a difference for their local area, or for families to tackle projects with their children to get them in the habit of volunteering.



    It often involves working outdoors,

    • 39 min
    Don and Pat Hawes describe their Workamping and RVing experiences on Podcast 077

    Don and Pat Hawes describe their Workamping and RVing experiences on Podcast 077

    Today we are going to talk with a couple who have been RVing for 25 years, and doing so full time for the past four years.



    Don and Pat Hawes are natives of Massachusetts. They started tent camping, then progressed to a popup before getting a travel trailer and finally settling into the 32-foot Jayco Class C motorhome they call home today. They explain why they selected a motorhome and the benefits it provides on the road and while serving as their home.



    As residents of New England, they spend most of their winters Workamping in southern states from Florida to Arizona, but always returned to their northern home in summer to spend time with their children and grandkids.



    They were Workamping 20 years ago before they even knew what it was when they helped in the kitchen and ran special events at a seasonal RV park in New Hampshire in exchange for a free campsite.



    Much of the Workamping jobs they’ve had centered around campgrounds, either as office workers, housekeepers, grounds-keeping or doing general repair. They did spend some time working on a farm, and they’ll describe what that job taught them.



    Don and Pat were the first Workampers hired at the Texan RV Park, the site of the National RV Training Academy. In fact, they built several new RV sites and helped develop some of the processes used today to run the park.



    Through their experiences, the greatest benefit they’ve enjoyed has been the people they have met – either fellow Workampers or campers who were staying at the RV parks.



    They certainly are enthusiastic about the RV lifestyle and the doors it opened for them to see a wide swath of America.



    One thing that Don and Pat did before starting their full-time RV lifestyle was research every aspect of RVing. They listened to podcasts, they joined online groups and they attended classes. They were very well prepared for whatever awaited them on their adventure.



    They are slowing down a bit this fall when they return to Texas where Don needs to have shoulder surgery and spend time recovering from that. Still, they are looking for jobs they can do remotely over the internet. The couple doesn’t need the money, but like Pat noted, they do like to have some extra spending cash.



    They have enjoyed immersing themselves into several different cultures, trying new foods, seeing new places and meeting new people. They have held jobs in one of the most remote parts of Arizona, but also worked near some larger cities, too. Each job offered them a rewarding experience.



    However, they have been very honest with their employers right up front regarding the types of jobs they were comfortable doing and admitting that there were some tasks they just couldn’t physically handle. That transparency worked to nurture close working relationships.



    As experienced campers and RVers, the Hawes’ shared their insight with campground owners who were appreciative of their suggestions regarding ways to improve the RV parks. The jobs also increased Don and Pat’s own skills by challenging them to try doing things they had never done before.



    Like Don said, every place is different, but it's all got something to entice you, something to make you regret leaving. That’s how positive memories are built.



    The biggest lesson they learned was to seek education before even venturing out on their adventure.



    Fortunately, Workamper News can teach you about the RV lifestyle and how to find great jobs. The National RV Training Academy can show you how to fix common problems most RVers will encounter in their own rigs. Both Workamper News and NRVTA can teach you how to start a mobile-based business.



    Don’t forget, if you’re new to the RV lifestyle or even just wondering if it is right for you, the RV Dreamers Journey from Workamper News can t...

    • 44 min
    Jody Duquette discusses creating the ideal Workamper resume on Podcast 076

    Jody Duquette discusses creating the ideal Workamper resume on Podcast 076

    Today, we will continue an interview with the executive director of Workamper News to discuss ways in which Workampers can increase the likelihood of getting their dream jobs.



    Jody Duquette is the executive director of Workamper News. As a Workamper herself, Jody knows that a resume is often the first impression someone makes with a prospective employer.



    Jody suggests that Workampers begin working on creating a resume at least six months before they want to start their first jobs.



    Fortunately, Workamper News offers a number of tools to help people craft their resumes. There are also a number of videos to watch and articles to read to learn how to prepare a resume that really stands out among the crowd of applicants.



    A Workamping resume is different than a traditional resume that people often craft to get a professional job. There is specific information that employers are looking for when reviewing resumes from Workampers, and Jody explains how to ensure that information is included so it draws the attention of an employer.



    Most Workampers take time to create a good resume when they first start out in the RV lifestyle, but they sometimes forget to keep their resumes updated with their most recent work experience. You’ve put in the time to doing a job, you might as well get credit for that experience.



    Including specific keywords to coincide with the types of jobs that employers are looking for is also critically important. While it may sound better to say that you were a domestic engineer for a company catering to itinerant outdoor guests, employers are searching the database for housekeepers.



    Jody Duquette offered some great advice on keeping resumes simple and to the point when listing jobs that are relevant to the position. She was right in noting that not every job someone has had since high school needs to be included unless the experience really pertains to the job they’re applying to get.



    Jody cited an example of a Workamper who literally worked as a NASA rocket scientist, but kept his experience confined to exactly what the employer was looking for, and that ensured he got the job.



    The best advice is to imagine a busy employer having to look through a bunch of resumes to find those people who have the basic qualifications in order to find people to interview. By ensuring that information that is essential to that particular job can be seen quickly as employers are scanning resumes, you greatly increase your chases of being considered.



    Another important point is to ensure that you frequently update your availability date as well as the states in which you want to work. You don’t want to field a bunch of job offers – or give employers false hope – for jobs in states you no longer desire to visit.



    It does not help to indicate that you want to work in 49 states. Employers see that as being someone who lacks focus and is likely to bolt when the first opportunity to work somewhere else opens up.



    One thing that employers also look for in resumes is information about who will be staying with the Workampers, whether it is a spouse, partner, children or even pets. They also look for information about the type of RV that Workampers use.



    It’s all about transparency. If you disclose information up front, there are no surprises later. That goes for employers and Workampers alike. Trying to hide something that will be discovered as soon as people arrive and start working is silly and unprofessional.



    For more information about how to avoid common pitfalls in creating an ideal Workamping resume, visit www.workamper.com. There is a plethora of tools available to help Workampers find great jobs that are ideal fits for their skills, talents, abilities and desires.

    • 43 min
    Jody Duquette describes the variety of jobs available to Workampers on podcast Episode 075

    Jody Duquette describes the variety of jobs available to Workampers on podcast Episode 075

    Today we are going to talk with one of the co-owners of Workamper News about the variety of jobs that are advertised on the platform every year.



    Jody Duquette is the executive director of Workamper News. Among other things, she oversees production of the magazine and online content management.



    In this episode, Jody describes the myriad of short-term jobs that are available to Workampers. They can be part-time or full-time. Some last just a couple of weeks, some an entire season, and some until the Workampers opt to move on to something else.



    While a majority of jobs advertised involve serving as camp hosts or helping out at campgrounds. Jody talks about jobs available at private campgrounds as well as public parks. She explains how national parks work with private concessionaires to run much of the public services provided at the parks. There are a number of hotels and lodges that also hire Workampers.



    Jody touches on a number of other categories, such as amusement parks, water parks, and other tourist-related attractions that would be considered entertainment. For example, people can find work at baseball stadiums and racetracks. Some people are even involved in traveling with musicians to help set up equipment and even perform.



    Retail outlets rely on Workampers to staff restaurants, souvenir stands, truck stops, convenience stores and gift shops. People can sell Christmas trees and are even hired to help set up holiday decorations and displays for businesses, governments and private homes.



    Workampers are hired to sell pumpkins, fireworks and farm produce, too. Whether it is sugar beets, blueberries, and other types of fruits and vegetables, people are hired to help with the harvest.



    Some places hire people to care for animals or help maintain ranches, farms and wineries.



    Not all Workampers are looking for paid positions. Some like to volunteer for a variety of faith-based and social services organizations. Nature preserves seek Workampers to help care for animals and museums seek them to greet visitors, too.



    Jody also talks about some of the small businesses that Workampers operate from their RVs.



    As the daughter of Steve and Kathy Jo Anderson, the owners of Workamper News, Jody practically grew up in the business. As the editor of Workamper News and the person overseeing content creation for the website and magazine, she is intimately familiar with the different types of employers seeking people to fill a variety of short-term jobs.



    Some of the jobs can be very lucrative, like working for the sugar beet harvest or serving as a gate guard controlling access to oil fields.



    Some jobs are in very busy places, like amusement parks and attractions, while others can be isolated in remote parts of the country, like at Army Corps of Engineers properties.



    Some involve working with people while others require Workampers to work with animals or completely on their own.



    Some Workampers operate their own businesses from the road, while others simply work as independent contractors for other companies.



    The bottom line is that there is a lot of opportunity for people to enjoy the RV and travel lifestyle now, and get paid for it.



    All you need is a resume and a list of employers seeking to hire people just like you. Workamper News can help get you started today by visiting www.workamper.com and signing up for a free account. That gives you access to the Workamper Academy and Facebook community so you can learn more about the lifestyle and how it works.



    When you’re serious about finding that first job, then you can become a Diamond or Platinum member to receive access to daily job hotlines,

    • 42 min

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