100 episodes

Workampers are adventuresome individuals, couples and families who have chosen a wonderful lifestyle that combines ANY kind of part-time or full-time work with RV camping. If you work as an employee, operate a business, or donate your time as a volunteer, AND you sleep in an RV, you are a Workamper! The Workamper Show is a podcast about workamping and the people who enjoy the lifestyle, either full-time or seasonally. It will feature interviews with current and former Workampers, as well as people who hire them to perform a wide variety of jobs. We'll even feature interviews with experienced RVers. The goal of The Workamper Show is to show people that they don't need to be retired to enjoy the RV lifestyle. We'll offer tips on getting started quickly, and making the most of the journey. Opportunities abound all over North America to work full- or part-time jobs. Some people work sales, management or customer service positions at campgrounds, tourist sites, amusement parks, wineries, farms and other public and private companies. Many Workampers accept new jobs every three to six months, which is plenty of time to immerse themselves in the culture of the area they're visiting. It's an excellent opportunity to experience a part of the country that many tourists only zip through on the way to their next destination. Perhaps they'll spend the summer in New England, enjoy the winter in Arizona, and head to the mountains the next year before venturing to Florida. Buckle up, you're about to launch a memorable adventure you've been dreaming about for years. The good news is that The Workamper Show will help you achieve your goal faster and more affordably than you imagined.

The Workamper Show Podcast Greg Gerber

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.7 • 15 Ratings

Workampers are adventuresome individuals, couples and families who have chosen a wonderful lifestyle that combines ANY kind of part-time or full-time work with RV camping. If you work as an employee, operate a business, or donate your time as a volunteer, AND you sleep in an RV, you are a Workamper! The Workamper Show is a podcast about workamping and the people who enjoy the lifestyle, either full-time or seasonally. It will feature interviews with current and former Workampers, as well as people who hire them to perform a wide variety of jobs. We'll even feature interviews with experienced RVers. The goal of The Workamper Show is to show people that they don't need to be retired to enjoy the RV lifestyle. We'll offer tips on getting started quickly, and making the most of the journey. Opportunities abound all over North America to work full- or part-time jobs. Some people work sales, management or customer service positions at campgrounds, tourist sites, amusement parks, wineries, farms and other public and private companies. Many Workampers accept new jobs every three to six months, which is plenty of time to immerse themselves in the culture of the area they're visiting. It's an excellent opportunity to experience a part of the country that many tourists only zip through on the way to their next destination. Perhaps they'll spend the summer in New England, enjoy the winter in Arizona, and head to the mountains the next year before venturing to Florida. Buckle up, you're about to launch a memorable adventure you've been dreaming about for years. The good news is that The Workamper Show will help you achieve your goal faster and more affordably than you imagined.

    In Episode 155, health coach Allen Lundy offers tips on how to develop or maintain a healthy lifestyle on the road

    In Episode 155, health coach Allen Lundy offers tips on how to develop or maintain a healthy lifestyle on the road

    Knowing that many people often start a new year with resolutions to eat better and get into shape, today I will interview a full-time RVer who works as a health coach. He’ll offer tips on what people can do to enjoy a healthier lifestyle while RVing.



    Allen Lundy has been RVing with his wife, Margie, for nearly 12 years. They raised three children while RVing and were one of the pioneers proving people could live and work from their RVs while roadschooling their kids and supporting a full-time travel lifestyle.



    They operated several businesses during that 12-year period, including an online scrapbooking company and worked as eBay resellers. However, Allen said the most lucrative and fulfilling business the Lundy’s developed was when they became health coaches.



    The couple teaches people how to use proper nutrition to lose weight and get healthy. Part of that involves showing people how to make minor changes to their diet, like better portion control, and to embrace more nutritious food rather than relying upon the convenience of fast food and processed foods.



    Even with smaller RV kitchens, people can make delicious meals and snacks. The Lundy’s share healthy recipes with their Facebook community all the time.



    The key to weight loss is not to have three big, healthy meals, but to be regularly eating something every two-and-a-half to three hours. Allen explains the benefits of adopting that kind of meal plan. He noted a diet mindset actually works against people trying to achieve a weight goal by simply controlling what they eat because they often slip back into old habits and pack on more pounds once the diet ends.



    Eating is just one aspect of a healthy lifestyle. The other involves exercise. Allen talks about his all-time favorite exercise, which is walking, as well as simple stretching exercises people can do to keep their muscles toned and flexible. He describes how he uses a TRX device to help him exercise wherever he may be.



    It is way too easy to eat garbage every day. I’m guilty of it as well. In fact, I have friends visiting from Wisconsin for the past six weeks and I’ve gained about 15 pounds just because I was knocked off my routine. Even though I gained some extra weight, I’m not nearly as heavy as I was after three years of full-time RVing.



    During that time, my weight ballooned to nearly 275 pounds. Thanks to Allen and his program which helped me develop a healthier lifestyle, I was able to lose more than 70 pounds from April to September in 2017. I am glad I did because I experienced a stroke a year later which would have had devastating consequences had I not taken the weight off.



    Allen also spoke about an often-neglected aspect to healthy living and that is ensuring people get a good night’s sleep. That starts with getting rid of a mattress that came with an RV and replacing it with something much more comfortable, like a memory foam mattress. He also offered some tips on ways to improve the bedroom environment for optimum sleep.



    I think people would be shocked at how simple it really is to adopt a healthier lifestyle and how much better they feel after shedding some tonnage and eating foods that give them energy rather than sapping their strength.



    If you would like some extra help in developing a healthy lifestyle, I encourage you to contact Allen on Facebook or Instagram. His Facebook profile is allenlundy, all one word, and you’ll find him at allenlundy17 on Instagram. You can also connect through his website at www.unlocating.com.



    All the Lundy’s coaching takes place online and, best of all,

    • 34 min
    In Episode 154, Adrian Mudd describes opportunities to work in New York at Six Flags Darien Lake

    In Episode 154, Adrian Mudd describes opportunities to work in New York at Six Flags Darien Lake

    Today I will speak with a representative from Six Flags Darien Lake, which is an amusement park, water park, hotel, campground and amphitheater located in western New York state.



    Adrian Mudd is a human resources supervisor for Six Flags Darien Lake. He has been with the company for almost five years and oversees the park’s on-site work programs that recruit Workampers and international students to spend a season performing a variety of jobs.



    Six Flags needs ride operators, food and beverage workers, people to sell tickets and work at the front gates, staff retail stores, run games and provide other support services, such as cleaning the park. At the hotel and campground, the park needs front desk staff to check guests in an out, and also to serve as housekeepers, groundskeepers and camp hosts.



    There are 60 RV sites set aside for use by Workampers, so Adrian is hoping to hire between 100 and 120 people this coming season. The jobs are open to couples, solo Workampers and teenagers traveling with their parents.



    Workampers are expected to put in at least 35 hours per week and they are paid for every hour starting at $15 per hour. Overtime is sometimes available at a time-and-a-half rate.



    Six Flags Darien Lake has been using Workampers since 2014 and the park has regularly expanded the number of opportunities available to Workampers every year since then. Adrian likes using Workampers because they are a tremendous help in getting the park ready for the season and they can work when traditional high school and college-age employees are not available because they’re either in class or heading back to school.



    Adrian likes employing older Workampers because they often have an interesting work history and lots of experience. Consequently, they tend to serve as mentors for younger folks. In fact, he said some of the younger workers return for several years just because they want to work with specific Workampers. Last year, employees ranged from 14 all the way to 94 years of age.



    Adrian is hiring people now to work this season. The park opens on May 6th, but only on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays until late June when schools are out for the summer break. Then, the park is open seven days a week until Labor Day, when it scales back to weekends once again until the end of October. At that time, the park hosts a super-fun Freight Fest event for Halloween to close out the season.



    This is an ideal opportunity for Workampers because, for six weeks in the spring and again in the fall, they only need to work weekends when the park is open. That gives them plenty of time to explore the region, which includes Niagara Falls, which is an hour away, and the gorgeous Finger Lakes region, which is about two hours east.



    Cleveland, Ohio, is about three and a half hours away and there are a lot of big museums in that city. If you want to experience a different culture, Toronto is only two and a half hours away. Western New York is a night-to-day difference between the busyness of the big cities of eastern New York, like New York City. And don’t forget about Lake Ontario and Lake Erie because there are a lot of coastal or water-related things to do around those Great Lakes.



    But, you don’t even have to travel far to have fun because Workampers get free admission to Six Flags Darien Lake, and there is enough going on at the park to keep them busy in the summer when they don’t have as much time off.



    A big attraction at the park is the Ride of Steel, which is 208 feet tall and reaches speeds up to 75 miles per hour. There are dozens of other rides to enjoy as well as live shows, concerts, restaurants and a full-size water park. There you can enjoy wet-and-wild tube rides, a wave pool or simply float along a lazy river.



    Either way, there are plenty of things to do when Workamping a...

    • 32 min
    Author Larry Jorgensen describes a unique money-making opportunity for Workampers in Episode 153

    Author Larry Jorgensen describes a unique money-making opportunity for Workampers in Episode 153

    This week I will be interviewing an author who wrote a history book about Coca-Cola and is looking for Workampers to encourage bookstores to buy the book as well as sell them at local events.



    Larry Jorgensen has been a big fan of Coca-Cola for many years, but he was amazed at the network of companies that helped to make it one of the world’s most widely-recognized brands. In 2017, he wrote The Coca-Cola Trail: People and Places in the History of Coca-Cola to capture and retain stories behind how the company grew from one man’s secret recipe into a multi-national corporation.



    It’s a book that focuses not so much on the corporation itself, but on interesting and historic places to visit that pertain to Coca-Cola, as well as the people who played a role in growing the company. For example, it describes a place in Vicksburg, Miss., where Coca-Cola was first put in a bottle. The building still exists and people can see old equipment used to first bottle the beverage. It’s now a museum of sorts, but it’s just one example of what people will read about as they venture along The Coca-Cola Trail.



    These are out-of-the-way places RVers may like to visit on their journeys. But, people who simply like history would enjoy reading the book, too.



    Larry is looking for Workampers who would like to sell the book independently to other people, like RVers, or by encouraging stores to carry copies. The outlets may include stores at campgrounds, bookstores, souvenir shops, museums, travel centers, etc. They can also sell books at local fairs, flea markets and community events.



    Workampers can buy the book at deeply discounted wholesale prices, then resell them while keeping the difference. Larry said they could make up to $10 per book.



    The best part is that Workampers don’t have to inventory a lot of books. They might want to keep a box handy for when they are traveling around and talk to someone who might want to read the book, or they visit a business where it would be a good tie-in to products they’re already selling.



    But, if they make a sale for a large order, Workampers simply call Larry and he can have a case shipped directly to the business. When businesses send in their payments, the Workampers receive a commission on the sale.



    So, there are two ways to make money. Buying books at wholesale and selling them at retail prices, or earning a 20% commission for simply taking an order and allowing Larry to ship it to whomever ordered the copies.



    Larry developed some point-of-sale literature that Workampers can use to entice people to buy the book. Like he said, people who travel a lot, such as full-time RVers, will encounter others would like to read the book or businesses that would like to include the book in their inventory.



    As an example, Larry described the many businesses along Route 66 that cater to history buffs and people who want to relive the golden years of travel. These communities made a name by serving travelers during the time when Coca-Cola was developing into a brand people liked to drink at soda fountains, restaurants, gas stations, theaters and travel centers.



    Many people have fond memories that include Coca-Cola, and they would be ideal prospects for buying the book. Because the book describes interesting Coke-related things to see all around America, people who like traveling will likely enjoy reading it, too.



    Larry actually wrote two books, the other is titled The Return to the Coca-Cola Trail, so he could add more stories about people and places he uncovered after the first book was published. Workampers have an opportunity to sell or get orders for both books.



    This opportunity is ideal for a history buff with a special interest in learning more about Coca-Cola and sharing that information with others.

    • 37 min
    RV refrigeration repair expert Roger Ford offers advice which could save RVers hundreds of dollars on Episode 152

    RV refrigeration repair expert Roger Ford offers advice which could save RVers hundreds of dollars on Episode 152

    Today I will speak with an RV refrigeration repair expert who addresses a problem that many RVers will encounter at some point during their ownership experience: Should the refrigerator be repaired or replaced?



    Roger Ford is the founder and co-owner of Ford’s RV Refrigeration Training Center in Benton, Ky., along with his wife, Onna Lee. Roger started specializing in RV refrigerator repair in 1984. At that time, he was hearing stories from RV owners saying repair centers were telling them their refrigerator could not be repaired and it had to be replaced.



    Yet, when Roger looked at the problem more closely, he discovered he could repair about 98% of the units instead.  He thought it was a local problem of RV technicians not knowing how to fix broken refrigerators. But, as he started training techs on the procedures to properly diagnose and fix refrigerators, he learned it was a widespread, global problem.



    The reason repair centers often recommend replacing refrigerators is two-fold. First, they don’t know how to fix them and, second, Roger said there is likely a brand-new refrigerator sitting in a storage area which the business wants to unload.



    The most common problem he sees with RV refrigerators is when they work on electric mode, but not on LP mode. In those cases, most of the time it often means the orifice, burner or flue needs to be cleaned. It is a simple, do-it-yourself repair.



    On the flip side, if the refrigerator works in LP mode, but not when plugged into electricity, it’s broken because the unit isn’t putting out the correct wattage. Roger said that’s also an easy, do-it-yourself repair any RV owner could complete.



    In fact, Roger said many RV refrigeration repairs are do-it-yourself with proper training. For example, changing a heating element or anything related to the unit’s controls or ventilation can be performed by RVers themselves. As long as RV owners are not doing anything with the tubing on back of a refrigerator, repairs can be completed with common household hand tools.



    For those unusual instances in which tubing needs to be replaced and gas re-inserted into the system, Roger explained that RV owners can still take it to a certified RV refrigeration repair specialist to get that job done for significantly less money than replacing the entire refrigerator.



    RV owners can save hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars by fixing their own RV refrigerators rather than replacing them. Like Roger said, why fill up landfills with perfectly good RV refrigerators when it just needs a new part or to be cleaned to get it back into working order?



    While Ford RV Refrigeration Training Center has trained people in person since its founding, COVID required the school to adapt and take all instruction online via a series of videos pertaining to the two primary refrigeration brands: Dometic and Norcold. Doing so opened the door for RV owners to learn to repair their own refrigerators.



    For just $25, RVers can watch all the brand-specific videos an unlimited number of times for a year. Then, RV owners don’t even have to go into a repair center to diagnose a problem. It can be done by watching a video or two and doing it themselves.



    When the interview was recorded, Roger mentioned people could view the videos for a week for $5. However, with parts availability being difficult this year, the company made a change a month ago to allow unlimited viewing for an entire year for just $25.



    The videos provide the specific steps for troubleshooting and repairing the refrigerators, while other videos apply to the unit’s cooling system as well.



    Even if people are uncomfortable doing diagnosing and repairing units by themselves, Roger said watching videos will educate RV owners so they can avoid being taken advantage of by unscrupulous RV service...

    • 27 min
    In Episode 151, online influencer Ashley Logsdon reveals advice on preparing families for a full-time RV lifestyle

    In Episode 151, online influencer Ashley Logsdon reveals advice on preparing families for a full-time RV lifestyle

    Today, I have a special guest. I will be interviewing a woman who travels full-time with her husband and three daughters, ages 9 to 14. She is an influencer who runs several businesses from her RV, has her own podcast and has developed some online classes for people contemplating the RV lifestyle.



    Ashley Logsdon started RVing with her family in 2016. Within two years, they had visited all 48 lower states. Now that’s moving! Today, they have a new adventure to serve as volunteers in every Florida state park.



    Before they started RVing, the family was living the American dream. They were making a six-figure income and living in a home with a white picket fence. When they started looking for a bigger home, the family took a hard look at their lifestyle, their long-term goals and what it would take to maintain it all.



    They watched close friends and relatives as their relationships fell apart, their health declined and they had forgotten how to have fun. The Logsdons had always dreamed of full-time travel “someday,” and finally decided to put a date on that. Then they started creating a lifestyle where they could truly enjoy each other and take part in some fabulous adventures.



    The family started RVing slowly by opting to try it for 90 days before making a permanent decision to sell everything and jump in full time. The experiment worked. The girls adopted well to being roadschooled. The family transitioned from a 1,450-square-foot home into a 230-square-foot RV with everyone on top of each other. However, they learned to set boundaries and to take breaks from each other when necessary. Today, they truly enjoy each other’s company with strong relationships among all family members.



    The plan required a transition away from Nathan’s six-figure real estate income to live frugally on Ashley’s income working remotely for her father’s company. Her father is Dan Miller, who is the author of 48 Days to the Work You Love, and developed an entire business around that philosophy, including webinars, coaching and online courses.



    Ashley became a coach herself and launched her own website at www.mamasaysnamaste.com to help others create a thriving mobile family life. She explains how she finds and services clients on the road. She also describes some of the online courses she created to help RVers and full-time families adjust to the lifestyle.



    Not only has she built a thriving online business, but she offers some very good advice for RVers and people considering the lifestyle.



    Her advice to try full-time RVing for 90 days before selling your home is a very good suggestion. The reality of RV life may be vastly different from the ideal you had envisioned for many years.



    You also need to explore the why behind your desire to hit the road, and it’s different for each person. One might want to travel to see a lot of things, others to meet more people, others just to relax in a different location each month. Having that discussion early prevents a lot of misunderstandings and disagreements.



    Ashley developed an online course called the 90 Day Family Road trip that explores a plethora of questions for families to explore in ways that take children and teens into account as well. If children aren’t happy with the RV lifestyle, then it probably won’t be the best choice for a family.



    The course’s goal is to create a life of freedom, peace and success on the road. It requires shared goals and compromise to give everyone something to look forward to on the trip.



    Ashley also noted how important it is to factor each family member’s unique personality style, likes and dislikes into the equation.



    Working as a family, the Logsdons actually created a vision for what their life would be like on the road and it centered around six words, “explore, respect, listen,

    • 44 min
    Jared Creach explains how he supports his family by fixing RVs on Episode 150

    Jared Creach explains how he supports his family by fixing RVs on Episode 150

    Today I am speaking with a mobile RV service technician who supports his young family on the road by fixing RVs wherever they travel.



    Jared Creach and his family have been RVing since 2014. He and his wife have a 9-year-old boy and a 6-year-old girl who travels with them as well as a 20-year-old son who is on his own. Prior to 2014, they were weekend RVers while Jared worked a corporate job at a General Motors assembly plant in Kansas.



    The family was attracted to the RV lifestyle as a way to have more control of their lives as well as to spend more time together as a family while the children were young.



    They settled on a Nitro toy hauler so the kids could bunk in the back and they have room for a golf cart to drive around the campgrounds they visit.



    Today, Jared supports his family by serving as a mobile RV technician. He had always tinkered with his own RV to keep it in working order. But, once they started full-time travel, Jared realized the need for mobile service technicians just to help people like him who lived in their RVs and could not afford to leave their units for several days or weeks at a time to get something repaired.



    There is often plenty of work to keep him busy by just fixing RVs at the campgrounds they visit. In fact, he has received calls for service within 20 minutes of his arrival. The key is to contact the campground in advance to find out if there is already a mobile service technician on-site and, if not, to let managers know when his family will arrive and be able to provide service.



    Once he arrives at a campground, Jared drops off a stack of business cards with the office staff and places a few in the mail area as well. Generally, just word-of-mouth that a mobile service technician will be staying at the campground for a while is enough for other guests to anticipate Jared’s arrival.



    The family is often at the same campground for two weeks to a month before moving on. His wife also owns her own business providing health supplements to clients wherever they may be. A former nurse, she has been offering Plexus products to customers for more than 10 years, which means she has built up a regular client base to support her business.



    Jared typically works a few hours every day and schedules his repair jobs around the family’s roadschooling adventures and other things they want to do together, like visiting museums and national parks.



    Jared completed RV technician training in Indiana. It took about six weeks to learn how to do pre-delivery inspections on new and used RVs, then learn to diagnose and repair problems with the rigs. His training covered RV appliances, plumbing issues and the like, but he also took separate courses from RV suppliers to learn to fix refrigerators, sliderooms and levelers.



    His biggest challenge on the road is to maintain a supply of parts for items that are frequently repaired, like motherboards for RV furnaces, and to get parts for various equipment found in recreation vehicles. However, he has been able to find parts he needs and have them shipped directly from suppliers or from Amazon. He has to make sure he purchases certified parts rather than cheaper knockoffs.



    Another challenge is to find places to stay. Jared doesn’t want to interfere with other mobile service technicians who are already staying at an RV park, and he is finding there are more RVs on the road today than there are places to park them, especially in some areas of the country.



    To ensure they have somewhere to go, the family plans their route months in advance. For example, they set up their winter travel schedule in August. Right now, their time is booked through March. Then, they hope to head west where Jared really wants to spend time visiting national parks in Utah before heading over to California to admire giant sequoia tre...

    • 31 min

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