57 episodes

Join Kino MacGregor, one of the world’s master yoga teachers, as she shares her yoga life hacks to translate the wisdom of yoga into a happier, more peaceful, more loving life. Listen to authentic, raw conversations and talks from Kino on her own and with real students about what yoga is really all about. Ignite or rekindle your inner spark to get on your mat and keep practicing.

Yoga Inspiratio‪n‬ Kino MacGregor

    • Fitness
    • 5.0 • 101 Ratings

Join Kino MacGregor, one of the world’s master yoga teachers, as she shares her yoga life hacks to translate the wisdom of yoga into a happier, more peaceful, more loving life. Listen to authentic, raw conversations and talks from Kino on her own and with real students about what yoga is really all about. Ignite or rekindle your inner spark to get on your mat and keep practicing.

    #57: The Intersection of Yoga and Music

    #57: The Intersection of Yoga and Music

    When I think about my first ever yoga class, I remember that feeling of finally being back in my body again. More than that, I finally felt comfortable in the body I was in. For Jonathan Ferrucci, his first class inspired him to wonder where his body ends and the rest of the universe begins. 
    Jonathan is a professional pianist sharing his experience at the intersection between yoga and music. For him, these are both languages he used to find his authenticity as not only a musician but as a human being. 
    His introduction to yoga came from his mother, but it wasn’t until he discovered the Ashtanga practice in his twenties that he started to really understand the spiritual journey of yoga.
    The ambitious, performance-oriented side of his mind is balanced by the patience of the practice, and Jonathan shares how his yoga routine transformed into a spiritual practice through Ashtanga. 
    Many of us can relate to Jonathan’s experience of being “outside of the body,” where our minds are constantly wandering in circles of anxiety and stress. Performing on stage can bring this anxiety to a new level, and Jonathan saw yoga as a tool that would help him return to his body. 
    Our yoga journeys are more than a sequence of poses or routines. Yoga is a practice; it is a daily effort in being present in the moment, which forces many of us to dig deep and recognize some parts of ourselves we may have forgotten or misplaced. 
    You cannot predict how the practice will affect you, and Jonathan shares how he was struck most by the silence and how it turned into the biggest lesson he’s learned on the yoga mat.  
    If any of us have ever lost ourselves and are looking for a way back onto the mat, Jonathan’s story will inspire you to come back to the practice with a new perspective. You may be humbled by this new perspective, or maybe you will learn something new. 
    Meet Jonathan at this intersection between self, yoga, and music with a special concert performance on Omstars. All charitable donations will bring music to children in disadvantaged situations. 
    If you have an inspiring story to share, please get in touch. Send an email at info@kinoyoga.com and tell me - what does yoga mean to you? You could be invited to guest spot on The Yoga Inspiration Podcast.
    Stay connected: @kinoyoga and @omstarsofficial
    View my teaching schedule, blogs, etc on Kinoyoga.com
    Get your free 30 day membership on Omstars.com& use code: PODCAST

    • 47 min
    #56: How to Fit Niyama into Your Yoga Practice

    #56: How to Fit Niyama into Your Yoga Practice

    What does yoga represent to you? Why did you take that first step onto the yoga mat? 
    I’ve been practicing yoga because I was looking for a more peaceful life. Now, more than twenty years later, I can confidently say that when I walk off my mat after practice I’m a little bit more peaceful, a little bit kinder. 
    Yoga practice has the power to bring a little bit more love and peace into your life by changing the way you treat others and the way you treat yourself. One can even argue that this quest for peace is why the practice of yoga has survived for so many years. 
    The spirituality of our yoga journey reminds us that this practice is more than just the pose. Even now, when we keep seeing perfectly photographed poses on Instagram, we have to remind ourselves that we are more than just our asana obsessions.
    We all have our favorite poses. I’m the first to admit that I really wanted to do a headstand when I started my Ashtanga practice. But the true journey of yoga is not limited to the physical poses. The path of yoga is more spiritual and metaphysical.
    At the core of the metaphysical practice of yoga are the five niyamas:
    Saucha: cleanliness and purity Santosa: contentment, acceptance, and optimism Tapas: discipline and persistence Svadhyaya: self-study and study of the sacred texts Isvarapranidhana: devotion to the higher power These moral and ethical self-disciplines help yogis relate with society. Since very few of us will become monks, the niyamas can help us householder yogis balance our yoga practice with the society in which we live. 
    As I discuss the five niyamas, you may recognize some of these from other episodes. I’ve discussed tapas many times before on this podcast, but not in the way it influences the effort the yogi dedicates to their practice. 
    In yoga, your effort is directly related to how much yoga is asking you to change your life. These changes can manifest in many ways, from dietary changes to complete mental makeovers in your subconscious. Tapas will help you balance your discipline so you can dedicate the right kind of effort to your practice. 
    Remember - we should have that feeling of effort or else we miss the very thing that yoga is trying to teach us.
    The five niyamas are the substance of the lifelong journey into the spiritual practice of yoga. You will think of them every time you get on your mat, and your perspective of the niyamas will change as you evolve on this journey. 
    Tune in now to learn how to fit the niyama into your yoga practice.
    I want to keep inspiring you to continue your practice. Send an email at info@kinoyoga.com and tell me - what does yoga mean to you? You could be invited to guest spot on The Yoga Inspiration Podcast.
    Stay connected: @kinoyoga and @omstarsofficial
    View my teaching schedule, blogs, etc on Kinoyoga.com
    Get your free 30 day membership on Omstars.com& use code: PODCAST

    • 1 hr 17 min
    #55: Letting Go (Part 2)

    #55: Letting Go (Part 2)

    The important thing to understand on this spiritual journey we’re on is knowing the difference between what is real and what is imaginary.
    If we only live in the imaginary, then we risk the spiritual practice becoming a way for us to ignore reality. On the other hand, some of us can get attached to difficult realities, which can lock us into those negative cycles of thinking. 
    Luckily, yoga practice and meditation teach us that we are not helpless victims of the life experience.
    We have the power to break our subconscious thinking patterns if we learn to accept our failures in the practice. It’s no secret that this spiritual journey is made up of struggles - that’s why we call it a practice, but through this practice we have the opportunity to learn.
    One of my biggest lessons on the yoga mat was (and sometimes still is) the acceptance of failure. More than that, it’s being able to sit with this failure with a relaxed and non-judgmental attitude. 
    For me personally, the more I expect something to work out in a particular way, the more tightly I’m wound to it, which breeds negative thoughts and judgmental behavior. Does this happen to you? 
    If the answer is yes, realize that the brain doesn’t subconsciously know the difference between imagination and reality. The way you react to real-world stimulation is the same way you react to a visualization, and your subconscious mind will interpret it as such. 
    It is this reaction that is the root of suffering, and I’m discussing the ways we can recognize these moments during our meditative and yoga practices so we can train our brain to understand the difference between what is imagined and what is reality.
    Recognizing this opens up the possibility to remain neutral in the face of failure, which makes it much easier to break the unconscious patterning of the mind. I want to empower you to sit with your failure without judging yourself, and learning to recognize the difference between your reality and your imagination is a great place to start.
    What failures have you learned to face on the yoga mat? Send an email at info@kinoyoga.com. You could be invited to guest spot on The Yoga Inspiration Podcast.
    Stay connected: @kinoyoga and @omstarsofficial
    View my teaching schedule, blogs, etc on Kinoyoga.com
    Get your free 30 day membership on Omstars.com& use code: PODCAST

    • 40 min
    #54: Letting Go (Part 1)

    #54: Letting Go (Part 1)

    For this meditation I want you to choose something you want to manifest. I always recommend having this idea in mind before you sit down for practice so you don’t interrupt the spiritual journey, but don’t hold it so tightly that you can’t relax your mind.
    Remember - your mind needs an anchor. Just as your body needs a seat in order to settle into this moment, so does your mind. And just as in previous practices, this anchor will be your inflowing and outgoing breath. 
    As you focus on your breathing, pay attention to the way it feels on your upper lip, the way it flows in and out of your nostrils. If you find your mind wandering, bring it back to your breath. 
    It’s important to use this anchor of your breath. Keep your attention focused there in order to practice the state of equanimity we’ve discussed before, but it’s interesting to note where your mind wanders during meditation.
    Is there a pattern to your thoughts? Do you find yourself focusing on the same emotional and physical reactions?
    All of these distractions - even something as simple as your feet falling asleep - are worth noting, especially if there is a pattern of reactivity. Acknowledge and note this discomfort, note how you want to react, and then bring your attention back to your breath.
    This is the work we put in during meditation. We are training our minds to be neutral, to detach our ego from all that we’ve experienced, and break the chain of attachment and aversion that traps us in negative thinking patterns. 
    This humble work of practicing holding a single point of concentration in your mind is the key to this meditative practice, and the key to unlocking the subconscious patterns we all fall victim to in our daily lives. Please find a comfortable space to sit and relax as you join me in this meditation.
    I want to keep inspiring you to continue your practice. Send an email at info@kinoyoga.com and tell me - what does yoga mean to you? You could be invited to guest spot on The Yoga Inspiration Podcast.
    Stay connected: @kinoyoga and @omstarsofficial
    View my teaching schedule, blogs, etc on Kinoyoga.com
    Get your free 30 day membership on Omstars.com& use code: PODCAST

    • 44 min
    #53 The Riddle of Mindfulness

    #53 The Riddle of Mindfulness

    Practicing meditation is a practice in doing nothing. That may sound like a riddle, but it’s the truth! And it’s why meditation is so difficult for some of us.
    My yoga teacher always used to say that meditation was very difficult. Asana yoga is almost easier because as we practice the poses, we are giving our minds a distraction from the sheer weight of nothingness.
    I’m here to tell you that the key to meditation lies in embracing this nothingness, this intangibility of the practice. Meditation is designed to move us away from the material world and into the quality of the exact moment we are in without a hectic need to define it or run away from it. 
    Unfortunately, our minds don’t always work that way. Don’t you ever experience doubts on the yoga mat?
    We are always looking for something to fill up the moment that, in the instant we’re left alone with the stillness, we start to doubt ourselves. 
    Who are you without your thoughts?
    What are we without our busy schedules?
    Sometimes there can be unprocessed thoughts and emotions laying heavy on our hearts that we don’t want to face. The silence forces us to face them, which breeds fear and doubt. 
    This is because if your mind is not trained it will ruminate back and forth between worrying about the past and projecting into the future. Meditation trains our mind to recognize the frequency of our thoughts so we can break that cycle of worry and doubt.
    I have a few helpful tips for my fellow yogis who have a hard time accepting the stillness of meditation, and I’m discussing many ways you can break the cycle, including: 
    First, be nice to yourself. Everyone is allowed to have their mind run wild once in a while. Just bring yourself back to your breath and refocus your mind. Count your breaths backward from ten to refocus your mind. Accept that meditation is supposed to be boring. If you’re bored, then you’re doing it right. Tune in now for more helpful ways to anchor your mind and more tips on how to get into that state of mind even if you don’t have a silent space to practice at home. Quarantine has made many of us modify our yoga practice to fit into our new lifestyles, and it’s important to share these moments together. 
    Practicing meditation together, as I have done in previous episodes of this podcast, creates a collective energy that inspires us and makes meditation a little less intimidating. When practice is more attainable like this, you’re more likely to stick with it.
    I want to keep inspiring you to continue your practice. Send an email at info@kinoyoga.com and tell me - what does yoga mean to you? You could be invited to guest spot on The Yoga Inspiration Podcast.
    Stay connected: @kinoyoga and @omstarsofficial
    View my teaching schedule, blogs, etc on Kinoyoga.com
    Get your free 30 day membership on Omstars.com& use code: PODCAST

    • 37 min
    #52: Meditating with an Attitude of Equanimity

    #52: Meditating with an Attitude of Equanimity

    Please prepare for a long sit if you’re joining me for this meditation. These guided meditations are important to the spiritual practice, but the longer we practice you may find that certain positions aren’t as comfortable as they used to be. So get comfortable and settle into this moment.
    Feel free to use a chair. Feel free to lay down. As long as we settle into this moment and are aware of our bodies and our breath releasing and relaxing, the meditation can begin.
    When we meditate, we are doing the subtle, inner work that is so important to our yoga practice. We are creating a path for the mind to be inwardly focused. Think of this as your chance to be the silent traveler in your mind - the silent observer of your thoughts. 
    As your thoughts arise, observe them without judgment or emotion. This takes practice, so be nice to yourself as your thoughts start to wander. If this happens, remind yourself that you are not your thoughts and return to your breath.
    Sometimes, when we’re in the stillness of meditation, it can be hard to turn off the waking mind. Your breath gives the mind a focal point so that you can begin to enter that stillness of mind. This takes great discipline, so I am inviting you to join me in this episode for a special meditative practice. 
    In this meditation, we practice recognizing Anapanasati, or the awareness of the inflowing and outflowing breath. This awareness puts us in a state of equanimity, where breath is simply breath and thoughts are simply thoughts, and we can truly reach that space of stillness.
    Because it is only in this stillness of the mind where you are open to receiving the energy of happiness and peace, and we can begin to practice metta. Join me now to practice finding that balance with all things, including our own minds.
    Share with me your tips for finding peace and stillness on the yoga mat. Send an email at info@kinoyoga.com and tell me - what does yoga mean to you? You could be invited to guest spot on The Yoga Inspiration Podcast.
    Stay connected: @kinoyoga and @omstarsofficial
    View my teaching schedule, blogs, etc on Kinoyoga.com
    Get your free 30 day membership on Omstars.com& use code: PODCAST

    • 38 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
101 Ratings

101 Ratings

TropcialismSF ,

Knowledge and wisdom

Kino is an incredible guide who brings her whole self to her teachings. She shares so much of the yoga lineage as well as her her bits of wisdom that she has accumulated over the decades. I especially loved hearing about her journey as a biracial Japanese American grappling with the legacy of white supremacy in America and also as a yogi. To be sure, this isn’t a focus of her podcast but I really do appreciate hearing from voices of color who are leaders in the Western yoga world because the wellness community also has a role to play in bringing healing to our fellow Americans who are in pain. Kino’s podcast is perfectly titled because she herself is a yoga inspiration.

Pacific Navigator ,

Freedom to practice yoga in today’s political environment

Today was the first time Of listening to Kinos podcast about voting and the importance of voting. The first time listening to Kinos podcast. I listened to it at the yoga studio where we can still practice yoga without condemnation with freedom to practice what we want. She brings out why we need to vote. Now I want to listen to all of her other podcast and I’m so excited I can’t wait like a kid in a candy store. Smart intelligent and a yogi. Yay

svethenna ,

Love this podcast!

Thank you Kino! I really enjoy listening your podcast, it’s very inspiring, I love it!

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