153 episodes

A show about the brilliant, powerful women breaking ground in the food world. Host Dana Cowin, former long-time Editor-in-Chief of Food & Wine Magazine, holds intimate conversations with successful and boundary-pushing female chefs and innovators. These are moving, personal stories of struggles and triumphs, personal and professional, that can provide lessons and inspiration for anyone looking to succeed in any industry.

Speaking Broadly Heritage Radio Network

    • Arts
    • 4.8 • 58 Ratings

A show about the brilliant, powerful women breaking ground in the food world. Host Dana Cowin, former long-time Editor-in-Chief of Food & Wine Magazine, holds intimate conversations with successful and boundary-pushing female chefs and innovators. These are moving, personal stories of struggles and triumphs, personal and professional, that can provide lessons and inspiration for anyone looking to succeed in any industry.

    Third Wave and Beyond: Helen Russell

    Third Wave and Beyond: Helen Russell

    Inspired by the proliferation of great coffee, Speaking Broadly host Dana Cowin kicks off a short series on the Third Wave and beyond with Helen Russell, co-founder of Equator Coffees. Helen launched Equator in 1995 with Brooke McDonnell, her partner in life and business from their home in Marin County, CA. Passionate and entertaining, Helen talks us through the recent history of coffee in the U.S., discusses the role of sourcing and story and imagines the future of the bean.

    Want to stay up to date on the latest Speaking Broadly episodes? To hear more conversations with Dana Cowin and her fierce guests, subscribe to Speaking Broadly (it’s free!) on iTunes or Stitcher. If you like what you hear, please take a moment to rate + review us on Apple’s podcast store and follow Dana on Instagram @speakingbroadly and @fwscout. Thanks for tuning in!

    • 37 min
    High Production Values: Fabienne Toback & Karis Jagger

    High Production Values: Fabienne Toback & Karis Jagger

    High on the Hog is an extraordinary documentary that is destined to re-shape our understanding of the African American influence on food in this country. Based on Dr. Jessica B. Harris's book of the same name, the Netflix series is essential, honest, moving, painful and joyful. On this episode of Speaking Broadly, Karis Jagger and Fabienne Toback, the show's producers, give listeners behind the scenes insight into the production; from what it felt like to walk on the red clay road trod by the enslaved in Benin to pitching the idea for getting it made.

    Want to stay up to date on the latest Speaking Broadly episodes? To hear more conversations with Dana Cowin and her fierce guests, subscribe to Speaking Broadly (it’s free!) on iTunes or Stitcher. If you like what you hear, please take a moment to rate + review us on Apple’s podcast store and follow Dana on Instagram @speakingbroadly and @fwscout. Thanks for tuning in!

    • 28 min
    Food Without Borders: Yasmin Khan

    Food Without Borders: Yasmin Khan

    Yasmin Khan, a long-time human rights activist, is the author of Ripe Figs, a book focusing on the Eastern Mediterranean — part travelogue, part cookbook, part meditation on the notion of borders in the 21st century. On the pod, we discuss the refugee crisis, what we can do as individuals and as a society to address the issues, and reasons for hope. "I've really grown to understand that there isn't some kind of (new) refugee crisis anywhere. People throughout all of history have migrated as a species when it's been necessary for our survival. It's just an intrinsic pattern of how we exist," Yasmin says. She also describes the spectacular recipes of the region and how they bring a sense of comfort, safety and a shared humanity. Tune in for a comprehensive take on how food crosses borders and bridges, rather than segregates, experiences.

    • 35 min
    Family Business First: Bricia Lopez

    Family Business First: Bricia Lopez

    "Anyone who grew up in a family business understands that it's family business first, and then family second. It's about surviving and making it work," says Bricia Lopez, co-owner, with her siblings of Guelageutza, the Oaxacan restaurant in Los Angeles. The story of Bricia, her family and the restaurant are inextricably entwined, each strengthening the other even during the most challenging of times. During the 2008 recession, when their parents were ready to give it all up, Bricia and her siblings took over the place even though they were broke. They persisted and were able to build on the legacy that was recognized by the late critic Jonathan Gold as one of the "best Oaxacan restaurants in the country." As new mothers, Bricia and her sister Paulina launched an incredible podcast Super Mamas to talk about all things maternal. And when the pandemic hit, the family once again banded together, "When 2020 happened, did it shock me? One hundred percent. But was I worried? Probably not. Because I already lost everything once. I know what that feels like. My siblings and I were prepared." The legacy continues with Bricia sharing her lessons about work ethic with her own kids. Listen in to her a story of generational love, struggle, triumph, and joy.

    • 46 min
    Journey of Chinese Food in America: NYHS Panel

    Journey of Chinese Food in America: NYHS Panel

    In this special episode of Speaking Broadly, I'm sharing a powerful discussion I had the opportunity to moderate, hosted by the New York Historical Society, titled The Journey of Chinese Food in America. My guests were two powerhouses: Jing Gao, founder of Fly By Jing, and Heather Lee, Assistant Professor of History at NYU Shanghai. Food is the entry point to both of their work. 

    Heather puts today's anti-Asian hate crimes in a historical context: "Chinese lives were so cheap 150 years ago, to the point where their lives were expendable. And despite the sort of physical violence they experienced every day they made an effort to find a space of negotiation. And one of the most viable ones, in which Americans, white Americans in particular, started changing their attitudes towards Asians and Chinese people was through food. And this was done through what I call gastro diplomacy. They said, 'You see me as competition; You see me as disease; You see me as racial pollution. But I'm not those things. I'm respectable, I can have a family. I'm not here to take anything from you. I'm really here to give what I can. And one of the things I can teach you about is food.'

    Jing is also teaching us all about food—about high-quality, cult-y Chinese condiments like Sichuan chili crisp. Jing was "fascinated by this 5000 year food history that nobody seemed to know about outside of China. I just started by learning and then wanting to share it with others like me. And it was also a way for me to connect with my extended family in China. I'm an only child. I had gotten so distant from my grandparents and my cousins and food was a common language we could speak. It also started as a very personal quest to reconnect with myself" after living all over the world.

    Listen in to hear their conversation about quality, authenticity, government intervention, and more.

    Want to stay up to date on the latest Speaking Broadly episodes? To hear more conversations with Dana Cowin and her fierce guests, subscribe to Speaking Broadly (it’s free!) on iTunes or Stitcher. If you like what you hear, please take a moment to rate + review us on Apple’s podcast store and follow Dana on Instagram @speakingbroadly and @fwscout. Thanks for tuning in!

    • 46 min
    How an Academic Adapted to Entrepreneurship: Kiki Aranita

    How an Academic Adapted to Entrepreneurship: Kiki Aranita

    Kiki Aranita, founder of Poi Dog in Philadelphia is a scholar and an entrepreneur. After closing her beloved brick and mortar restaurant because of the pandemic, she has just launched a new line of Hawaiian style sauces, including Maui Lavender Ponzu and Chile Peppah Water. On Speaking Broadly, she describes the connection between academia and starting a new business:

    "The Latin Greek Institute greatly informed who I am as a person, how I approach academia and how I pretty much approach anything. In the first four to five weeks, I learned the entire grammatical system of an ancient language, and then spent the following five weeks translating texts. Every single one of those days, I cried. It is the most soul destroying way of learning a language, but it is effective. So now, in order to start something new, I need to get all of the information and digest all of the materials, learn the language of whatever I'm getting into whether that's restaurants or making sauces. I need to become very fluent before I proceed."

    Listen in for more on Kiki's life as a Hong Kong Handover Kid, Dad sourcing, Hawaiian families and more.

    Want to stay up to date on the latest Speaking Broadly episodes? To hear more conversations with Dana Cowin and her fierce guests, subscribe to Speaking Broadly (it’s free!) on iTunes or Stitcher. If you like what you hear, please take a moment to rate + review us on Apple’s podcast store and follow Dana on Instagram @speakingbroadly and @fwscout. Thanks for tuning in!

    • 44 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
58 Ratings

58 Ratings

Victoria Spruiell ,

Great Podcast I Just Discovered!

I just discovered this podcast and love it so much! I really enjoyed your conversation with Karis Jagger and Fabienne Toback and learning about the High on the Hog documentary, which I’m interested in watching! Looking forward to new episodes!

ChimeraCom ,

My old boss is rockin’ the podcast world!

Dana was my boss when I was a wee-intern at Vogue. She was one of the approachable ones...although only a couple of years my senior, she was a memorable mentor to me. Years and an amazing career later for Dana, she now brings that approachable style to her interviews and lets her guests be exactly who they are. Continued congrats Dana! And it was great to hear a Brit say that they normally drank “bloody f’in awful tea!”
Like Folgers in your cup to a coffee drinker! Haha. Signed Nancy B.

rkgar ,

The smartest and most engaging

Dana Cowin is one of the best interviewers I've ever heard--smart, subtle, challenging while inviting. She sees food from the widest cultural angle--and the format of a conversation between women feels natural yet so elevated here.

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